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This is my first experiment with C++0x rvalue references and something strange seems to be going on.

In the code sample below the factory function MakeWindow returns a Window object by value. The caller uses it to initialize a Window object. If I understood correctly, this should invoke the move constructor. In order to detect this I throw an exception there. On top of that I disabled the copy constructor:

#include <iostream>


// Fake WinAPI
typedef void* HWND;
HWND CreateWindow() { return (void*)1; }
void DestroyWindow(HWND) { }
// End WinAPI


// C++ WinAPI Wrapper Library
class Window
{
public:
    Window(HWND inHandle) :
        mHandle(inHandle)
    {
        std::cout << "Window constructor. Handle: " << inHandle << std::endl;
    }

    Window(Window && rhs) :
        mHandle(rhs.mHandle)
    {
        std::cout << "Window move constructor. Handle: " << mHandle << std::endl;
        rhs.mHandle = 0;
        throw 1; // this is my "breakpoint"
    }

    ~Window()
    {
        std::cout << "Window destructor. Handle: " << mHandle << std::endl;
        if (mHandle)
        {
            DestroyWindow(mHandle);
        }
    }

private:
    Window(const Window&);
    Window& operator=(const Window&);

    HWND mHandle;
};


// Factory function
Window MakeWindow()
{
    return Window(CreateWindow());
}


int main()
{

    {
        Window window(MakeWindow());
    }
    std::cout << "Everything is OK." << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

However the code runs fine without this exception being thrown. This is the console output:

Window constructor. Handle: 0x1
Window destructor. Handle: 0x1
Everything is OK.

If I comment out the move constructor then compilation fails with the following errors:

MysteryMove.cpp: In function 'Window MakeWindow()':
MysteryMove.cpp:39:5: error: 'Window::Window(const Window&)' is private
MysteryMove.cpp:49:33: error: within this context
MysteryMove.cpp: In function 'int main()':
MysteryMove.cpp:39:5: error: 'Window::Window(const Window&)' is private
MysteryMove.cpp:57:35: error: within this context
make: *** [all] Error 1

It doesn't seem to make sense. Can anyone explain what is going on?

Update

Thanks to @Philipp I learned that move constructors can also be omitted. This is described in §12.8/34 and footnote 124 of the N3126 draft standard.

It is there also mentioned that RVO is only allowed for non-volatile objects. This means I can get around it writing the factory function like this:

// Factory function
Window MakeWindow()
{
    volatile Window window(CreateWindow());
    return const_cast<Window&&>(window);
}

And indeed it works:

Window constructor. Handle: 0x1
Window move constructor. Handle: 0x1
terminate called after throwing an instance of 'int'
Abort trap
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1  
Try g++ -fno-elide-constructors –  FredOverflow Oct 24 '11 at 9:35
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1 Answer

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Isn’t it obvious? Your code returns a copy of the local temporary Window:

Window MakeWindow()
{
    return Window(CreateWindow());
}

The compiler will in fact optimize this copy away (via return value optimization) – this is why your move constructor is never actually called – but for correctness a copy constructor must still be present.

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I suspected that. However, I'm not aware of the exact rules, but I would expect RVO to be disallowed in this situation because it drastically alters the program flow. –  StackedCrooked Jan 22 '11 at 11:57
3  
@Stacked: the standard explicitly allows the elision of copy (and, I suspect, move) constructor calls. This is not allowed for any other functions though. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 22 '11 at 11:59
    
But the move constructor is also responsible for invalidating the source object. Can this be automatically generated? Knowing which members need to be set to their null value would require some artificial intelligence and educated guesses... –  StackedCrooked Jan 22 '11 at 12:04
2  
@Stacked: if the move constructor is elided, the source and destination objects are identical, so no object has to be invalidated. See §12.8/34 and footnote 124 in N316. –  Philipp Jan 22 '11 at 12:13
1  
@Konrad: §12.8/10 says "If the class definition does not explicitly declare a move constructor, one will be implicitly declared as defaulted if and only if X does not have a user-declared copy constructor and the move constructor would not be implicitly defined as deleted." Similar for the copy constructor (§12.8/8): "If the class definition does not explicitly declare a copy constructor and there is no user-declared move constructor, a copy constructor is implicitly declared as defaulted". So I think in this case you wouldn't have to declare the copy constructor. –  Philipp Jan 22 '11 at 15:19
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