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I am using stored procedures in sql server. I have several stored procedures calls written in c#. I want to wrap them inside transaction:

//Begin Transaction here
sp1Call();
sp2Call();
sp3Call();
//Commit here
//Rollback if failed

is there any way to do it?

Update: I am using the enterprise library. example to sp1Call():

public static void sp1Call(string itemName)
    {
        DbCommand command = db.GetStoredProcCommand("dbo.sp1_insertItem");
        db.AddInParameter(command, "@item_name", DbType.String, itemName);
        db.ExecuteNonQuery(command);
    }
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1  
How do you call your procedures? What client api do you use? –  alexn Jan 22 '11 at 17:14
    
I am using Enterprise Library. Please see Updates. –  Naor Jan 22 '11 at 17:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You'll want to check out SqlTransaction.

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Please see updates. Can you give an example? –  Naor Jan 22 '11 at 17:27
    
I'm not familiar with the Microsoft.Practices libraries, but quickly browsing the documentation, it looks like you'll need TransactionScope (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/h5w5se33) instead. –  P Daddy Jan 22 '11 at 17:41
    
I can't find a way to do this with the Enterprise Library framework. –  Naor Jan 22 '11 at 18:25
    
If I'm not mistaken, you just need to wrap your calls to sp1Call(), sp2Call(), etc. in a using(var tran = new TransactionScope()) block. –  P Daddy Jan 22 '11 at 18:27
    
Oh, and call tran.Complete() at the end of the block. –  P Daddy Jan 22 '11 at 18:28

Just a quick search comes up with DBTransaction:

   using (DbConnection connection = db.CreateConnection())
   {
     connection.Open();
     DbTransaction transaction = connection.BeginTransaction();
     try
     {
        DbCommand command = db.GetStoredProcCommand("dbo.sp1_insertItem");
        db.AddInParameter(command, "@item_name", DbType.String, itemName);
        db.ExecuteNonQuery(command, transaction);
        transaction.Commit();                   
     }
     catch
     {
       //Roll back the transaction.
       transaction.Rollback();
     }  
   }
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I am using the enterprise library. I have more then 100 stored procedures. I can't change each of them to your format. –  Naor Jan 22 '11 at 17:33
    
why would you have to change the stored proc themselves for this? –  BrokenGlass Jan 22 '11 at 17:48
    
I would have to change the calls to the stored procedures. –  Naor Jan 22 '11 at 18:00
    
@Naor: yes that is true –  BrokenGlass Jan 22 '11 at 18:04
    
So I am telling you I can't afford that. –  Naor Jan 22 '11 at 18:24

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