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This works:

List(3, 1, 2).sorted apply 1
res1: Int = 2

And this works:

var x = List(3, 1, 2).sorted
x: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3)
x(1)
res2: Int = 2

but this doesn't:

List(3, 1, 2).sorted (1)

error: type mismatch;
 found   : Int(1)
 required: Ordering[?]
       List(3, 1, 2).sorted (1)
                             ^

And even parentheses don't clue the parser in to what I want:

(List(3, 1, 2).sorted)(1)

error: type mismatch;
 found   : Int(1)
 required: Ordering[?]
       (List(3, 1, 2).sorted)(1)

It seems like a natural expression. What am I doing wrong?

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1  
sorted is not parameterless: it takes an implicit parameter, which you can leave out. That's the problem - your (1) is interpreted as an explicit parameter to sorted and not a parameter to the apply method of its return value, as in List(1, 2, 3).tail(0), which works fine. Unfortunately I don't know if there's any solution. –  Knut Arne Vedaa Jan 22 '11 at 17:30
    
Have you tried List(3, 1, 2).sorted()(1)? –  Madoc Jan 22 '11 at 18:30
    
@Madoc: that doesn't work, you can't leave out the implicit by providing an empty parameter list, the the compiler complains about unspecified parameter. –  Knut Arne Vedaa Jan 22 '11 at 19:00
1  
List(3, 1, 2).sorted(implicitly[Ordering[Int]])(1) –  extempore Jan 23 '11 at 5:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This works:

(Listed(3, 1, 2).sorted _)(1),

but I'm not sure whether it is much more convenient to use than:

Listed(3, 1, 2).sorted apply 1.

I'd go for the latter anyways.

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Actually, my plan is to assign it to a variable -- it's readable, where apply is just peculiar. –  Malvolio Jan 22 '11 at 19:05

The shortest you could make it--not without a small performance penalty, however--is

class Allow_\[A](a: A) { def \ = a }
implicit def allowEveryone[A](a: A) = new Allow_\[A](a)

scala> List(1,3,2).sorted\(1)
res0: Int = 2

If you can accept another character, this might be nicer: <> looks like parens anyway, and can be read as "please fill in the implicit parameters like usual":

class Allow_<>[A](a: A) { def <> = a }
implicit def allowEveryone[A](a: A) = new Allow_<>[A](a)

scala> List(1,3,2).sorted<>(1)
res0: Int = 2
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The required parameter can be provided this way:

List(3, 1, 2).sorted(implicitly[Ordering[Int]])(1)

Though using apply() looks shorter and less scary.

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I think you have to keep the apply. The reason is that sorted isn't "parameterless", it's defined as

def sorted [B >: A] (implicit ord: Ordering[B]) : List[A]

As this is an implicit parameter, the Ordering[Int] is normally provided automatically, but if you use parens, the compiler thinks you want to specify another Ordering[Int] (let's say backwards).

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1  
So you're saying I'm screwed? Why didn't wrapping it in parens help? –  Malvolio Jan 22 '11 at 17:43
    
Because parens don't change anything here. Consider (math.abs)(-1): The first parens don't prevent abs from receiving its argument. The same is true for sorted, so it just expects an arg for its argument list with the implicit. Nice workaround from Saew, BTW. –  Landei Jan 22 '11 at 20:36

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