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In my .module file, I have an basic implementation of hook_cron:

function foobar_cron()
{
    $file = fopen('my_file', 'a');
    // stuff
    fclose($file);
}

The problem is that this method is called by (http://www.example.com/)cron.php, so the path my_file is incorrect. How do I specify the correct path for my_file which is located in the foobar module directory?

share|improve this question
<?php
   // something like the following. Might need to tweak the pathing.
   $path = drupal_get_path('module', $module_name) . '/my_file'; // $module_name = foobar in your case 
?>
share|improve this answer
    
It only gives a path relative to the htdocs directory, no? – caxpeyr Jan 22 '11 at 18:48
    
umm, depending on how your server is configured that should return a string path like /sites/all/modules/foobar/myfile so yes, relative to htdocs. So you can modify it and manually do something like: _$path = '/var/wwww/htdocs' . drupal_get_path('module', 'foobar'). '/my_file'; $file = fopen($path, 'a'); That should work? – skålfyfan Jan 22 '11 at 19:09
    
It does, but that is exactly what you want because the current directory for Drupal is always the top level directory, as all requests go through index.php, cron.php or update.php. So it is safet to directly use $path. Drupal itself is doing the same thing. – Berdir Jan 23 '11 at 14:07

I found out that you can use following code to access files in your module's directory when implementing hook_cron():

function foobar_cron()
{
        $file = fopen(realpath(".") . PATH_SEPARATOR . drupal_get_path('module', 'foobar') . PATH_SEPARATOR . 'myfile.txt', 'a');
}

PATH_SEPARATOR makes sure the path also works on Windows.

share|improve this answer
    
PATH_SEPARATOR is either ":" or ";", not /. What you meant is DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR. Also, it is quite safe to simply use / because that works always, including Windows. – Berdir Jan 23 '11 at 14:05

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