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I'm still pretty new to objective-c.

As far as I can understand, any object I do not get from alloc, new, copy, or mutableCopy should be assumed to be in the autorelease pool.

I assume that also means that if I create a function that creates and returns a new instance of an object, I should place that in the autorelease pool before returning.

For example, I have a function that parses xml, and returns an object representing the data in the xml, that object should be in the autorelease pool before returning.

My primary concern is iPhone development, but a general answer would be appreciated.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do it both ways: either return an object that is owned by the caller, or return an object that is not owned by the caller (e.g., an autoreleased object). Regardless of which strategy you choose, follow the naming conventions. For instance,

- (NSString *)fullNameCopy {
    return [[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:@"%@ %@", self.firstName, self.LastName];
}

returns an NSString object that is owned by the caller. The method name is fullNameCopy, which follows the naming rules: a method that contains ‘copy’ in its name returns an object that’s owned by the caller. The return value is not placed in the autorelease pool.

Alternatively,

- (NSString *)fullName {
    return [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@ %@", self.firstName, self.LastName];
}

or

- (NSString *)fullName {
    NSString *s = [[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:@"%@ %@", self.firstName, self.LastName];
    return [s autorelease];
}

return a string that is not owned by the caller, and the method name doesn’t contain alloc, new, or copy. The return value is autoreleased, hence it will be deallocated when the corresponding autorelease pool is drained unless the caller explicitly chooses to retain it.

That said, in your particular scenario, the second strategy — returning an object that is not owned by the caller — looks like a better solution. The caller will most likely either process the object immediately (so he won’t be interested in owning the object) or keep it in a property (which will most likely be either a copy or a retain property).

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Yep, your right. If you allocated memory in your function you are also responsible for releasing it. Because you are returning the allocated object, the only way for you to release it, in this situation, is by placing it in the autorelease pool, e.g.

return [newObject autorelease];

(edit)

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The first part of @Pete's question is exactly wrong. –  kubi Jan 22 '11 at 20:49
    
Could you explain what problems you would into if placed in the autorelease? I really don't see the problem? –  boyfarrell Jan 22 '11 at 20:54
    
Actually I think, Pete just got it right. The convention is, any method that does not start with new, alloc or copy should return an autoreleased object. The caller of this method is then responsible for retaining it, if he wants to hold on to it. –  Marco Peluso Jan 22 '11 at 20:56
    
@kubi I think you read the question wrong. He understands how to write new, alloc or copy methods. @Pete is asking about other methods that his class implements, my answer stands I do believe. –  boyfarrell Jan 22 '11 at 21:13
1  
@boyfarrell, you're right, I did miss the not. If you make an edit to your answer I can remove my downvote. –  kubi Jan 23 '11 at 0:17
  1. You should read the Objective-C memory management guide.
  2. Any object returned from a new, alloc or copy method is yours. You own it and you must release it.
  3. Any object returned from any other method is in the autorelease pool. If you want to keep the object beyond your current scope, you must retain it.

The XML example is probably correct: If you're returning an object from a method and the name of that method does not contain new or copy in the name you should, by convention, return an autoreleased object.

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Actually I think, Pete just got it right. The convention is, any method that does not start with new, alloc or copy should return an autoreleased object. The caller of this method is then responsible for retaining it, if he wants to hold on to it. –  Marco Peluso Jan 22 '11 at 20:57
    
I think you have misread my post. I think you missed the "not" in "any object I do not get from alloc ...". But as I understand what you write, if I name my method "parse", then I should call autorelease before returning. if I name if "newUserFromXml", then I should not? –  Pete Jan 22 '11 at 20:59
    
And nice with the link, I have not read it yet, but will soon. –  Pete Jan 22 '11 at 21:00
    
Ah, you're right. I did miss the not. –  kubi Jan 23 '11 at 0:15
    
It is not always the case that an object returned by a method whose name doesn’t contain new, alloc, or copy is an autoreleased object. Apple’s documentation warns against thinking of them as autoreleased objects because that’s an implementation detail that is sometimes correct, sometimes not. Instead, it’s better to think of them as objects that are owned/not owned. –  Bavarious Jan 23 '11 at 0:38

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