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I have:

public static class DataManager
{
    private static Dictionary<string, DataTable> dataTables;

    //    extension method
    public static DataTable GetTable ( this string TableName )
    {
        return dataTables[ TableName ];
    }

}

I didn't want to expose the Dictionary collection, and this is the way I thought to accomplish this task. In my calling method:

DataTable GetTable (string TableName)
{
    return TableName.GetTable();
}

Is there another way I should, or could do this? Or is this acceptable?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I don't think that this is a good idea because, your method does not operate on a string (what the extension method would state), it operates on DataManager. So just use a static method in this case.

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I think the word work should be in italics, not not :) Perhaps operate would be a better choice here. –  leppie Jan 22 '11 at 20:49
1  
Well, strictly speaking, as it's written it would work on a string ("foo".GetTable()), but that seems like a rather unintuitive (and annoying) calling convention. –  Adam Robinson Jan 22 '11 at 20:52
1  
@leppie, Adam: thanks, edited –  ulrichb Jan 22 '11 at 20:53
1  
@IAbstract: yes as mentioned by Adam, this works, but it is unintuitive. –  ulrichb Jan 22 '11 at 20:59
1  
@IAbstract: No, it would be unintuitive because noone would expect to find your method available on a string object, not even with IntelliSense. Your method needs a string argument but doesn't "focus" on it. Would the following make sense? string connString = "..."; IDbConnection conn = connString.CreateConnection(); -- Another problem you'd be facing: What if your method has >1 parameter? Which one will be the type on which you're basing the extension method? It'll quickly get arbitrary; because there's no good reason why you should use an extension method in this way in the first place! –  stakx Jan 22 '11 at 21:17

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