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Sometimes, I come across the following interview question: How to implement 3 stacks with one array ? Of course, any static allocation is not a solution.

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You mean dynamic memory allocation is not a solution? –  sth Jan 22 '11 at 21:37
1  
@sth I guess it means than restricting each stack to n/3 space is not a valid solution. –  belisarius Jan 23 '11 at 3:45
    
@belisarius. You are right. I do not allocate some parts of the array for the stacks in advance. –  Michael Jan 23 '11 at 7:24
3  
I suspect it's a question where no perfect solution exists, designed to show how you approach problems. The best strategy is to bluff your way through it - tell them you'd use the Futzerberger algorithm and then scream at them for not having heard about it. –  Rafał Dowgird Jan 23 '11 at 7:35
4  
@Rafal Futzerberger is tuned for five stacks, not three :) –  belisarius Jan 23 '11 at 8:13

10 Answers 10

up vote 42 down vote accepted

Space (not time) efficient. You could:

1) Define two stacks beginning at the array endpoints and growing in opposite directions.

2) Define the third stack as starting in the middle and growing in any direction you want.

3) Redefine the Push op, so that when the operation is going to overwrite other stack, you shift the whole middle stack in the opposite direction before Pushing.

You need to store the stack top for the first two stacks, and the beginning and end of the third stack in some structure.

Edit

alt text

Above you may see an example. The shifting is done with an equal space partitioning policy, although other strategies could be chosen depending upon your problem heuristics.

Edit

Following @ruslik's suggestion, the middle stack could be implemented using an alternating sequence for subsequent pushes. The resulting stack structure will be something like:

| Elem 6 | Elem 4 | Elem 2 | Elem 0 | Elem 1 | Elem 3 | Elem 5 |

In this case, you'll need to store the number n of elements on the middle stack and use the function:

f[n_] := 1/4 ( (-1)^n (-1 + 2 n) + 1) + BS3  

to know the next array element to use for this stack.

Although probably this will lead to less shifting, the implementation is not homogeneous for the three stacks, and inhomogeneity (you know) leads to special cases, more bugs and difficulties to maintain code.

share|improve this answer
    
It's the best solution, but I'd redefine the push op so that the middle stack won't need to be moved completely. It's more difficult, but it's possible. –  ruslik Jan 23 '11 at 0:32
2  
@ruslik Of course it's possible. Just use the array as a linked list. But you have a lot of space wasted, and it somehow goes against the "use an array" concept. –  belisarius Jan 23 '11 at 3:55
1  
A minor point, but it may be better to start the middle stack at 1/3 of the way through the array, rather than at the midpoint. Assuming the stacks are filling at around the same rate on average, this will mean you can wait longer to make your first large move. –  MahlerFive Jan 23 '11 at 6:18
    
@MahlerFive The stacks occupancy distribution is a big IF. The same happens with the shift "distance". I guess you are right if nothing is known about the intended usage. –  belisarius Jan 23 '11 at 6:25
    
+1. Great answer, plus that's a nice illustration you've got there. –  stakx Jan 23 '11 at 9:33

As long as you try to arrange all items from one stack together at one "end" of the array, you're lacking space for the third stack.

However, you could "intersperse" the stack elements. Elements of the first stack are at indices i * 3, elements of the second stack are at indices i * 3 + 1, elements of the third stack are at indices i * 3 + 2 (where i is an integer).

+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+..
| A1 : B1 : C1 | A2 : B2 : C2 |    : B3 | C3 |    : B4 :    |    :  
+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+..
                  ^                        ^         ^
                  A´s top                  C´s top   B´s top

Of course, this scheme is going to waste space, especially when the stacks have unequal sizes. You could create arbitrarily complex schemes similar to the one described above, but without knowing any more constraints for the posed question, I'll stop here.

Update:

Due to the comments below, which do have a very good point, it should be added that interspersing is not necessary, and may even degrade performance when compared to a much simpler memory layout such as the following:

+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+..
| A1 : A2 :    :    :    | B1 : B2 : B3 : B4 :    | C1 : C2 : C3 :  
+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+..
       ^                                  ^                    ^
       A´s top                            B´s top              C´s top

i.e. giving each stack it's own contiguous block of memory. If the real question is indeed to how to make the best possible use of a fixed amount of memory, in order to not limit each stack more than necessary, then my answer isn't going to be very helpful.

In that case, I'd go with @belisarius' answer: One stack goes to the "bottom" end of the memory area, growing "upwards"; another stack goes to the "top" end of the memory area, growing "downwards", and one stack is in the middle that grows in any direction but is able to move when it gets too close to one of the other stacks.

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4  
How is this any different from arbitrarily dividing the array into three statically allocated sections of equal size? –  Ferruccio Jan 22 '11 at 22:29
    
@Ferruccio, it isn't. At least not in any fundamental way. Memory is consumed in a more "uniform" way. And because the values stay "closer together", CPU caches might be able to deal better with interspersed stacks. –  stakx Jan 22 '11 at 22:38
3  
it's actually worse. Most probably they won't be used with the same speed, and each stack will use different cache line, thus using 3 times more memory bandwidth. 3 explicitely different stacks will have better locality. Also, the main point of the question is to limit total size to the available space, and not each one to one third of it. –  ruslik Jan 23 '11 at 0:28

Maintain a single arena for all three stacks. Each element pushed onto the stack has a backwards pointer to its previous element. The bottom of each stack has a pointer to NULL/None.

The arena maintains a pointer to the next item in the free space. A push adds this element to the respective stack and marks it as no longer in the free space. A pop removes the element from the respective stack and adds it to the free list.

From this sketch, elements in stacks need a reverse pointer and space for the data. Elements in the free space need two pointers, so the free space is implemented as a doubly linked list.

The object containing the three stacks needs a pointer to the top of each stack plus a pointer to the head of the free list.

This data structure uses all the space and pushes and pops in constant time. There is overhead of a single pointer for all data elements in a stack and the free list elements use the maximum of (two pointers, one pointer + one element).


Later: python code goes something like this. Note use of integer indexes as pointers.

class StackContainer(object):
    def __init__(self, stack_count=3, size=256):
        self.stack_count = stack_count
        self.stack_top = [None] * stack_count
        self.size = size
        # Create arena of doubly linked list
        self.arena = [{'prev': x-1, 'next': x+1} for x in range(self.size)]
        self.arena[0]['prev'] = None
        self.arena[self.size-1]['next'] = None
        self.arena_head = 0

    def _allocate(self):
        new_pos = self.arena_head
        free = self.arena[new_pos]
        next = free['next']
        if next:
            self.arena[next]['prev'] = None
            self.arena_head = next
        else:
            self.arena_head = None
        return new_pos

    def _dump(self, stack_num):
        assert 0 <= stack_num < self.stack_count
        curr = self.stack_top[stack_num]
        while curr is not None:
            d = self.arena[curr]
            print '\t', curr, d
            curr = d['prev']

    def _dump_all(self):
        print '-' * 30
        for i in range(self.stack_count):
            print "Stack %d" % i
            self._dump(i)

    def _dump_arena(self):
        print "Dump arena"
        curr = self.arena_head
        while curr is not None:
            d = self.arena[curr]
            print '\t', d
            curr = d['next']

    def push(self, stack_num, value):
        assert 0 <= stack_num < self.stack_count
        # Find space in arena for new value, update pointers
        new_pos = self._allocate()
        # Put value-to-push into a stack element
        d = {'value': value, 'prev': self.stack_top[stack_num], 'pos': new_pos}
        self.arena[new_pos] = d
        self.stack_top[stack_num] = new_pos

    def pop(self, stack_num):
        assert 0 <= stack_num < self.stack_count
        top = self.stack_top[stack_num]
        d = self.arena[top]
        assert d['pos'] == top
        self.stack_top[stack_num] = d['prev']
        arena_elem = {'prev': None, 'next': self.arena_head}
        # Link the current head to the new head
        head = self.arena[self.arena_head]
        head['prev'] = top
        # Set the curr_pos to be the new head
        self.arena[top] = arena_elem
        self.arena_head = top
        return d['value']

if __name__ == '__main__':
    sc = StackContainer(3, 10)
    sc._dump_arena()
    sc.push(0, 'First')
    sc._dump_all()
    sc.push(0, 'Second')
    sc.push(0, 'Third')
    sc._dump_all()
    sc.push(1, 'Fourth')
    sc._dump_all()
    print sc.pop(0)
    sc._dump_all()
    print sc.pop(1)
    sc._dump_all()
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For simplicity if not very efficient memory usage, you could[*] divide the array up into list nodes, add them all to a list of free nodes, and then implement your stacks as linked lists, taking nodes from the free list as required. There's nothing special about the number 3 in this approach, though.

[*] in a low-level language where memory can be used to store pointers, or if the stack elements are of a type such as int that can represent an index into the array.

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A variant on an earlier answer: stack #1 grows from the left, and stack #2 grows from the right.

Stack #3 is in the center, but the elements grow in alternate order to the left and right. If N is the center index, the stack grows as: N, N-1, N+1, N-2, N+2, etc. A simple function converts the stack index to an array index.

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You could run out of space for any stack before all your array is full. –  belisarius Jan 23 '11 at 6:13

I have a solution for this question. The following program makes the best use of the array (in my case, an array of StackNode Objects). Let me know if you guys have any questions about this. [It's pretty late out here, so i didn't bother to document the code - I know, I should :) ]

public class StackNode {
    int value;
    int prev;

    StackNode(int value, int prev) {
        this.value = value;
        this.prev = prev;
    }
}


public class StackMFromArray {
    private StackNode[] stackNodes = null;
    private static int CAPACITY = 10;
    private int freeListTop = 0;
    private int size = 0;
    private int[] stackPointers = { -1, -1, -1 };

    StackMFromArray() {
        stackNodes = new StackNode[CAPACITY];
        initFreeList();
    }

    private void initFreeList() {
        for (int i = 0; i < CAPACITY; i++) {
            stackNodes[i] = new StackNode(0, i + 1);
        }
    }

    public void push(int stackNum, int value) throws Exception {
        int freeIndex;
        int currentStackTop = stackPointers[stackNum - 1];
        freeIndex = getFreeNodeIndex();
        StackNode n = stackNodes[freeIndex];
        n.prev = currentStackTop;
        n.value = value;
        stackPointers[stackNum - 1] = freeIndex;
    }

    public StackNode pop(int stackNum) throws Exception {
        int currentStackTop = stackPointers[stackNum - 1];
        if (currentStackTop == -1) {
            throw new Exception("UNDERFLOW");
        }

        StackNode temp = stackNodes[currentStackTop];
        stackPointers[stackNum - 1] = temp.prev;
        freeStackNode(currentStackTop);
        return temp;
    }

    private int getFreeNodeIndex() throws Exception {
        int temp = freeListTop;

        if (size >= CAPACITY)
            throw new Exception("OVERFLOW");

        freeListTop = stackNodes[temp].prev;
        size++;
        return temp;
    }

    private void freeStackNode(int index) {
        stackNodes[index].prev = freeListTop;
        freeListTop = index;
        size--;
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
                    // Test Driver
        StackMFromArray mulStack = new StackMFromArray();
        try {
            mulStack.push(1, 11);
            mulStack.push(1, 12);
            mulStack.push(2, 21);
            mulStack.push(3, 31);
            mulStack.push(3, 32);
            mulStack.push(2, 22);
            mulStack.push(1, 13);
            StackNode node = mulStack.pop(1);
            node = mulStack.pop(1);
            System.out.println(node.value);
            mulStack.push(1, 13);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}
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no documentation.. but i found the code neat & self-explanatory.. –  superuser Apr 6 at 14:23

This problem can be solved by partitioning array for any given stack size 'N'.

  1. For given stack count determine start/top count for every stack.
  2. Determine maximum value every stack can reach.
  3. While pushing element on a particular stack use it'sown top and max value to determine the push location as well as check is stack is full.
  4. While poping out element from particular stck use max/top values for that stack and update the same as well as check if stack is empty.

The java code answer for this problem can be fond here, http://programmingpassionforjava.blogspot.com/2012/10/efficiently-implement-3-stacks-in.html

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Whilst this does theoretically answer the question, it would be preferable to include the essential parts of the answer here, and provide the link for reference. –  Chris Oct 14 '12 at 19:30

I think you should divide array in 3 pieces, making head of first stack at 0, head of second stack at n/3, head of 3rd stack at n-1.

so implement push operation on :

  1. first & second stack make i++ and for 3rd stack make i--;
  2. If you encounter that first stack have no space to push, shift 2nd stack k/3 positions forward. Where k is the number of positions left to be filled in array.
  3. If you encounter that second stack have no space to push, shift 2nd stack 2*k/3 positions backward. Where k is the number of positions left to be filled in array.
  4. If you encounter that third stack have no space to push, shift 2nd stack 2*k/3 positions backward. Where k is the number of positions left to be filled in array.

We are shifting k/3 and 2*k/3 when no space is left so that after shifting of middle stack, each stack have equal space available for use.

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package job.interview; import java.util.Arrays;

public class NStack1ArrayGen<T> {

    T storage[];
    int numOfStacks;
    Integer top[];
    public NStack1ArrayGen(int numOfStks, T myStorage[]){
        storage = myStorage;
        numOfStacks = numOfStks;
        top = new Integer[numOfStks];
        for(int i=0;i<numOfStks;i++){top[i]=-1;}
    }
    public void push(int stk_indx, T value){
        int r_indx = stk_indx -1;
        if(top[r_indx]+numOfStacks < storage.length){
            top[r_indx] = top[r_indx] < 0 ? stk_indx-1 : top[r_indx]+numOfStacks;
            storage[top[r_indx]] = value;
        }
    }
    public T pop(int stk_indx){
        T ret = top[stk_indx-1]<0 ? null : storage[top[stk_indx-1]];
        top[stk_indx-1] -= numOfStacks;
        return ret;
    }
    public void printInfo(){
        print("The array", Arrays.toString(storage));
        print("The top indices", Arrays.toString(top));
        for(int j=1;j<=numOfStacks;j++){
            printStack(j);
        }
    }
    public void print(String name, String value){
        System.out.println(name + " ==> " + value);
    }
    public void printStack(int indx){
        String str = "";
        while(top[indx-1]>=0){
            str+=(str.length()>0 ? "," : "") + pop(indx);
        }
        print("Stack#"+indx,str);
    }
    public static void main (String args[])throws Exception{
        int count=4, tsize=40;
        int size[]={105,108,310,105};
        NStack1ArrayGen<String> mystack = new NStack1ArrayGen<String>(count,new String[tsize]); 
        for(int i=1;i<=count;i++){
            for(int j=1;j<=size[i-1];j++){
                mystack.push(i, "stk"+i+"_value"+j);
            }
        }
    }
}

This prints:

The array ==> [stk1_value1, stk2_value1, stk3_value1, stk4_value1, stk1_value2, stk2_value2, stk3_value2, stk4_value2, stk1_value3, stk2_value3, stk3_value3, stk4_value3, stk1_value4, stk2_value4, stk3_value4, stk4_value4, stk1_value5, stk2_value5, stk3_value5, stk4_value5, stk1_value6, stk2_value6, stk3_value6, stk4_value6, stk1_value7, stk2_value7, stk3_value7, stk4_value7, stk1_value8, stk2_value8, stk3_value8, stk4_value8, stk1_value9, stk2_value9, stk3_value9, stk4_value9, stk1_value10, stk2_value10, stk3_value10, stk4_value10] The top indices ==> [36, 37, 38, 39] Stack#1 ==> stk1_value10,stk1_value9,stk1_value8,stk1_value7,stk1_value6,stk1_value5,stk1_value4,stk1_value3,stk1_value2,stk1_value1 Stack#2 ==> stk2_value10,stk2_value9,stk2_value8,stk2_value7,stk2_value6,stk2_value5,stk2_value4,stk2_value3,stk2_value2,stk2_value1 Stack#3 ==> stk3_value10,stk3_value9,stk3_value8,stk3_value7,stk3_value6,stk3_value5,stk3_value4,stk3_value3,stk3_value2,stk3_value1 Stack#4 ==> stk4_value10,stk4_value9,stk4_value8,stk4_value7,stk4_value6,stk4_value5,stk4_value4,stk4_value3,stk4_value2,stk4_value1

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enum stackId{LEFT, MID, RIGHT };

class threeStacks {

int* arr;

int leftSize;
int rightSize;
int midSize;
int mid;
int maxSize;
public:
    threeStacks(int n):leftSize(0), rightSize(0), midSize(0), mid(n/2), maxSize(n)
    {
        arr = new int[n];
    }

    void push(stackId sid, int val){
        switch(sid){
            case LEFT:
                pushLeft(val);
            break;

            case MID:
                pushMid(val);
            break;

            case RIGHT:
                pushRight(val);
        }
    }

    int pop(stackId sid){
        switch(sid){
            case LEFT:
                return popLeft();
            case MID:
                return popMid();
            case RIGHT:
                return popRight();
        }
    }


    int top(stackId sid){
        switch(sid){
            case LEFT:
                return topLeft();
            case MID:
                return topMid();
            case RIGHT:
                return topRight();
        }
    }

    void pushMid(int val){
        if(midSize+leftSize+rightSize+1 > maxSize){
            cout << "Overflow!!"<<endl;
            return;
        }
        if(midSize % 2 == 0){
            if(mid - ((midSize+1)/2) == leftSize-1){
                //left side OverFlow
                if(!shiftMid(RIGHT)){
                    cout << "Overflow!!"<<endl;
                    return; 
                }
            }
            midSize++;
            arr[mid - (midSize/2)] = val;
        }
        else{
            if(mid + ((midSize+1)/2) == (maxSize - rightSize)){
                //right side OverFlow
                if(!shiftMid(LEFT)){
                    cout << "Overflow!!"<<endl;
                    return; 
                }
            }
            midSize++;
            arr[mid + (midSize/2)] = val;                           
        }
    }

    int popMid(){
        if(midSize == 0){
            cout << "Mid Stack Underflow!!"<<endl;
            return -1;
        }
        int val;
        if(midSize % 2 == 0)
            val = arr[mid - (midSize/2)];
        else
            val = arr[mid + (midSize/2)];
        midSize--;
        return val;
    }

    int topMid(){
        if(midSize == 0){
            cout << "Mid Stack Underflow!!"<<endl;
            return -1;
        }
        int val;
        if(midSize % 2 == 0)
            val = arr[mid - (midSize/2)];
        else
            val = arr[mid + (midSize/2)];
        return val;
    }

    bool shiftMid(stackId dir){
        int freeSpace;
        switch (dir){
            case LEFT:
                freeSpace = (mid - midSize/2) - leftSize;
                if(freeSpace < 1)
                    return false;               
                if(freeSpace > 1)
                    freeSpace /= 2;
                for(int i=0; i< midSize; i++){
                    arr[(mid - midSize/2) - freeSpace + i] = arr[(mid - midSize/2) + i];
                }
                mid = mid-freeSpace;
            break;
            case RIGHT:
                freeSpace = maxSize - rightSize - (mid + midSize/2) - 1;
                if(freeSpace < 1)
                    return false;               
                if(freeSpace > 1)
                    freeSpace /= 2;
                for(int i=0; i< midSize; i++){
                    arr[(mid + midSize/2) + freeSpace - i] = arr[(mid + midSize/2) - i];
                }
                mid = mid+freeSpace;
            break;              
            default:
                return false;
        }
    }

    void pushLeft(int val){
        if(midSize+leftSize+rightSize+1 > maxSize){
            cout << "Overflow!!"<<endl;
            return;
        }
        if(leftSize == (mid - midSize/2)){
            //left side OverFlow
            if(!shiftMid(RIGHT)){
                cout << "Overflow!!"<<endl;
                return; 
            }
        }
        arr[leftSize] = val;
        leftSize++;
    }

    int popLeft(){
        if(leftSize == 0){
            cout << "Left Stack Underflow!!"<<endl;
            return -1;
        }
        leftSize--;
        return arr[leftSize];
    }

    int topLeft(){
        if(leftSize == 0){
            cout << "Left Stack Underflow!!"<<endl;
            return -1;
        }
        return arr[leftSize - 1];
    }

    void pushRight(int val){
        if(midSize+leftSize+rightSize+1 > maxSize){
            cout << "Overflow!!"<<endl;
            return;
        }
        if(maxSize - rightSize - 1 == (mid + midSize/2)){
            //right side OverFlow
            if(!shiftMid(LEFT)){
                cout << "Overflow!!"<<endl;
                return; 
            }
        }
        rightSize++;
        arr[maxSize - rightSize] = val;
    }

    int popRight(){
        if(rightSize == 0){
            cout << "Right Stack Underflow!!"<<endl;
            return -1;
        }
        int val = arr[maxSize - rightSize];
        rightSize--;
        return val;
    }

    int topRight(){
        if(rightSize == 0){
            cout << "Right Stack Underflow!!"<<endl;
            return -1;
        }
        return arr[maxSize - rightSize];
    }

};

share|improve this answer
2  
When you only submit source code, you should consider adding comments so people can follow your train of thought through your code. –  Aiias Apr 8 '13 at 3:12
    
Downvoted for no explanation!! Though we can trace your code ... it would be easier for us to understand what your logic is.. –  Fox Sep 21 '13 at 5:18

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