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I Have a MySQL query that is being generated by a PHP script, the query will look something like this:

SELECT * FROM Recipe_Data WHERE 404_Without_200 = 0 AND Failures_Without_Success = 0 AND RHD_No IN (10, 24, 34, 41, 43, 51, 57, 59, 61, 67, 84, 90, 272, 324, 402, 405, 414, 498, 500, 501, 510, 559, 562, 595, 632, 634, 640, 643, 647, 651, 703, 714, 719, 762, 765, 776, 796, 812, 814, 815, 822, 848, 853, 855, 858, 866, 891, 920, 947, 956, 962, 968, 1049, 1054, 1064, 1065, 1070, 1100, 1113, 1119, 1130, 1262, 1287, 1292, 1313, 1320, 1327, 1332, 1333, 1335, 1340, 1343, 1344, 1346, 1349, 1352, 1358, 1362, 1365, 1482, 1495, 1532, 1533, 1537, 1549, 1550, 1569, 1571, 1573, 1574, 1596, 1628, 1691, 1714, 1720, 1735, 1755, 1759, 1829, 1837, 1844, 1881, 1919, 2005, 2022, 2034, 2035, 2039, 2054, 2076, 2079, 2087, 2088, 2089, 2090, 2091, 2092, 2154, 2155, 2156, 2157, 2160, 2162, 2164, 2166, 2169, 2171, 2174, 2176, 2178, 2179, 2183, 2185, 2186, 2187, 2201, 2234, 2236, 2244, 2245, 2250, 2255, 2260, 2272, 2280, 2281, 2282, 2291, 2329, 2357, 2375, 2444, 2451, 2452, 2453, 2454, 2456, 2457, 2460, 2462, 2464, 2465, 2467, 2468, 2469, 2470, 2473, 2474, 2481, 2485, 2487, 2510, 2516, 2519, 2525, 2540, 2545, 2547, 2553, 2571, 2579, 2580, 2587, 2589, 2597, 2602, 2611, 2629, 2660, 2662, 2700, 2756, 2825, 2833, 2835, 2858, 2958, 2963, 2964, 3009, 3090, 3117, 3118, 3120, 3121, 3122, 3123, 3126, 3127, 3129, 3130, 3133, 3135, 3137, 3138, 3139, 3141, 3142, 3145, 3146, 3147, 3151, 3152, 3155, 3193, 3201, 3204, 3219, 3221, 3222, 3223, 3224, 3225, 3226, 3227, 3228, 3229, 3231, 3232, 3233, 3234, 3235, 3237, 3239, 3246, 3250, 3253, 3259, 3261, 3291, 3315, 3328, 3377, 3381, 3383, 3384, 3385, 3387, 3388, 3389, 3390, 3396, 3436, 3463, 3465, 3467, 3470, 3471, 3484, 3507, 3515, 3554, 3572, 3641, 3672, 3683, 3689, 3690, 3692, 3693, 3694, 3697, 3698, 3705, 3711, 3713, 3715, 3716, 3717, 3719, 3720, 3722, 3726, 3727, 3732, 3737, 3763, 3767, 3770, 3771, 3772, 3773, 3803, 3810, 3812, 3816, 3846, 3847, 3848, 3851, 3874, 3882, 3902, 3903, 3906, 3908, 3916, 3924, 3967, 3987, 4006, 4030, 4043, 4045, 4047, 4058, 4067, 4107, 4108, 4114, 4115, 4131, 4132, 4133, 4137, 4138, 4139, 4140, 4141, 4142, 4146, 4150, 4151, 4152, 4153, 4157, 4158, 4160, 4163, 4166, 4167, 4171, 4179, 4183, 4221, 4225, 4242, 4257, 4435, 4437, 4438, 4443, 4446, 4449, 4450, 4451, 4452, 4454, 4460, 4550, 4557, 4618, 4731, 4775, 4804, 4972, 5025, 5026, 5039, 5042, 5294, 5578, 5580, 5599, 5602, 5649, 5726, 5779, 5783, 5931, 5934, 5936, 5939, 5940, 5941, 5978, 6044, 6056, 6113, 6116, 6118, 6122, 6123, 6125, 6127, 6128, 6129, 6130, 6131, 6135, 6141, 6145, 6147, 6150, 6152, 6153, 6154, 6160, 6166, 6169);

The column RHD_No is the primary key for this database, and there are about 400,000 rows total. The problem is, the query is extremely slow, it's often around 2 seconds, but I've seen it get as long as 10.

When I try to explain the query, everything seems like it should be fine:

+----+-------------+-------------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table       | type  | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref  | rows | Extra       |
+----+-------------+-------------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | Recipe_Data | range | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 4       | NULL |  420 | Using where |
+----+-------------+-------------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+------+-------------+

When I profile the query I get:

mysql> show profile;
+--------------------------------+----------+
| Status                         | Duration |
+--------------------------------+----------+
| starting                       | 0.000015 |
| checking query cache for query | 0.000266 |
| Opening tables                 | 0.000009 |
| System lock                    | 0.000004 |
| Table lock                     | 0.000006 |
| init                           | 0.000115 |
| optimizing                     | 0.000038 |
| statistics                     | 0.000797 |
| preparing                      | 0.000047 |
| executing                      | 0.000002 |
| Sending data                   | 2.675270 |
| end                            | 0.000007 |
| query end                      | 0.000003 |
| freeing items                  | 0.000071 |
| logging slow query             | 0.000002 |
| logging slow query             | 0.000058 |
| cleaning up                    | 0.000005 |
+--------------------------------+----------+

I've been working on this problem for a long time and I haven't been able to find a solution. Is there anything overtly wrong with this query? I don't see how looking at 420 rows should take 2+ seconds.

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Just a hunch, but what do all your indexes look like on Recipe_Data? –  bob-the-destroyer Jan 22 '11 at 23:11
    
I have a primary key an RHD_No, and a UNIQUE key on another column. –  zmbush Jan 22 '11 at 23:14
    
Not keys (per se), but indexes. I'm not a mysql expert, so this isn't an answer, but have you tried adding an index on 404_Without_200, Failures_Without_Success? See: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/mysql-indexes.html for usage in queries, and dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/create-index.html for creating indexes. –  bob-the-destroyer Jan 22 '11 at 23:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You are accessing 420 rows by primary key which will probably lead to an index access path. This could access 2 index pages and one data page per key. If these are in cache, the query should run fast. If not, every page access that goes to disk will incur the usual disk latency. If we assume 5ms disk latency and 80% cache hits, we arrive at 420*3*0.2*5ms=1.2 seconds which is on the order of what you're seeing.

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10  
An explanation for database performance based on metrics and concrete numbers rather than generalizations? Be still my beating heart. –  Conspicuous Compiler Jan 22 '11 at 22:46
1  
So how would I go about improving my query? –  zmbush Jan 22 '11 at 23:10
    
@Conspicuous Compiler - LOL. +1 –  DVK Jan 23 '11 at 1:24

You should transform the IN clauses to INNER JOIN clauses.

You can transform a query like this one:

SELECT  foo   
FROM    bar   
WHERE bar.stuff IN  
       (SELECT  stuff FROM asdf)

Into a query like this other one:

SELECT  b.foo 
FROM    ( 
        SELECT  DISTINCT stuff 
        FROM    asdf ) a 
JOIN    bar b 
ON      b.stuff = a.stuff

You will gain a lot of performance.

As the php generate the query, try some kind of trick like a temporary table for the items inside the IN clause. Always try to avoid the IN clauses if you can, because they are very time consuming.

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2  
Could you perhaps provide a link that explains why and/or measures how much in clauses are slower than joins? –  Peter G. Jan 22 '11 at 22:43
1  
Of course: explainextended.com/2009/08/18/… –  Jonathan Jan 22 '11 at 22:52

The problem is that IN is basically treated as a bunch of ORs (e.g.

col IN (1,2,3)

is

col = 1 OR col = 2 OR col = 3

This is a LOT slower than a join.

What you should do is to generate the SQL code which creates the temporary table, populates it with the values in the "IN" clause, and then join with that temp table

CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE numbers (n INT)

Then in a loop, add

INSERT numbers  VALUES ($next_number)

Then at the end

SELECT * FROM numbers, Recipe_Data 
WHERE numbers.n = RHD_No
share|improve this answer
    
Don't forget to drop the temp table at the end, obviously :) –  DVK Jan 22 '11 at 22:46
    
I think that the performance of IN clauses like that must vary a lot from server to server. This question is tagged "mysql" so maybe that's what you're referring to. In my experience with SQL Server 2000/2005, large IN clauses for primary key lookups were extremely fast (the database and queries in the application I'm thinking of were all pretty highly optimized; it was all code in a high-traffic, large-volume web app). –  Pointy Jan 22 '11 at 23:05
    
@Pointy - It may be server specific, I know that Sybase had that performance behavior with IN, at least on older versions (pre 12). –  DVK Jan 22 '11 at 23:27
    
I've also seen performance issues with large IN clauses. MySQL doesn't seem to using the indexes as well it could be with these clauses. –  Chris Henry Jan 23 '11 at 1:19

I'm going to gamble here and suggest that executing the following query just once to create an index suitable for your query should reduce the query time by at least a second...

CREATE INDEX returnstatus ON Recipe_Data(404_Without_200,Failures_Without_Success)

See: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/create-index.html for creating indexes, and http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/mysql-indexes.html for how indexes are used in queries.

Failing that, view all running processes on mysql to see if a currently running query from any source just refuses to die while consuming all the server's time and kill it. See: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/kill.html

Failing that, determine what else each record may have in common to avoid having to reference each one individually by ID number in your IN statement. If necessary, add another table column to track that commonality. Then, add column(s) having that commonality to the above index and filter by that in your WHERE clause instead of using the IN statement. For example, if you want only those ID numbers to print out on page, have a visible column as type: tinyint with value 0 to exclude, and value 1 to include in your search results, then add visible column to your indexs and WHERE clause to speed up the query. You wouldn't need that IN statement at all.

Perhaps your in statement is dynamically built using a previous query. If that's the case, try pulling all rows with Recipe_Data WHERE 404_Without_200 = 0 AND Failures_Without_Success = 0. Then in your PHP script, simply discard a record in your fetch loop if the RHD_No doesn't match an expected value.

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