Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

On the CakePHP website it shows that you would create a users table and a groups table for users and user groups using ACL: http://book.cakephp.org/view/1544/Preparing-our-Application

However most other tutorials e.g. NetTuts shows creating three tables (in addition to the users table) to use ACL: http://net.tutsplus.com/tutorials/php/how-to-use-cakephps-access-control-lists/

What is the difference between the two? Thanls

share|improve this question

if you are asking about the extra tables named Acos,Aros and aros_acos

In both tutorial we need to use these tables.In the cakephp.org. there is a section called Initialize the Db Acl tables where they running a command to create those tables. where as in nettuts they showing us creating it manually.

Any way cakePHP need 5 tables to run the ACL perfectly.In that Acos,Aros and aros_acos are cakePHP defined tables and Users and Groups are user defined tables.

CakePHP is storing the User permissions as a Tree with Aros(Access Request Objects means users) hasAndBeongsToMany relation with Acos (Access Control Objects means actions)

share|improve this answer
    
How come in the Cake tutorial it never mentions the three tables and in the NetTuts tutorial it never mentions that the groups table? – Cameron Jan 23 '11 at 18:47
    
cakebook uses command line to bake it. so wheh the command cake schema create DbAcl it creates the needed tables. please go though the link which i provided. Nettuts didn't mentioned the Groups because in their sample app They are setting user wise permission only not the group wise.I think i didn't told Group is a must.I mentioned 5 tables for perfect ACL functionality – RSK Jan 24 '11 at 7:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.