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I am trying to use:

$('mydiv').delegate('hover', function() {  
    $('seconddiv').show();  
}, function() {  
    //For some reason jQuery won't run this line of code  
    $('seconddiv').hide();  
});
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If you provide an example of your HTML, I can give an answer more specific to your markup. –  user113716 Jan 23 '11 at 4:32
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5 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The accepted answer will no longer work in jQuery 1.9+, because the pseudo-event hover is no longer supported (upgrade guide).

Also since jQuery 1.7 it is recommended to use the new on()(docs) for all event binding purposes (anyway delegate() still does the job).

You can easily migrate user113716's solution by replacing hover with mouseenter mouseleave:

$('mydiv').delegate('seconddiv','mouseenter mouseleave', function(event) {
    $(this).toggle( event.type === 'mouseenter' );  
});

Using on():

$('mydiv').on('mouseenter mouseleave', 'seconddiv', function(event) {
    $(this).toggle( event.type === 'mouseenter' );  
});

If your problem is more complex than a simple toggle, I suggest binding two separate events:

$('mydiv').on('mouseenter', 'seconddiv', function( event ) {
    // do something
}).on('mouseleave', 'seconddiv', function( event ) {
    // do something different
});
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1  
I had no idea you could bind two events using on –  Chris Abrams Feb 18 '13 at 22:23
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With delegate()(docs) , you assign it to a container, and the first argument is the element that should trigger the event.

Also, .delegate() accepts only one function, so for the hover event you need to test the event.type to determine show()(docs) or hide()(docs) .

$('.someContainer').delegate('.someTarget','hover', function( event ) {
    if( event.type === 'mouseenter' )  
        $('seconddiv').show();  
    else
        $('seconddiv').hide();  
});

For show/hide, a shorter way to write this is to use toggle()(docs), which can accept a switch argument where true means show and false means hide:

$('.someContainer').delegate('.someTarget','hover', function( event ) {
    $('seconddiv').toggle( event.type === 'mouseenter' );  
});

Note that the mouseenter event is reported as of jQuery 1.4.3. If you're using 1.4.2, it will be reported as mouseover.


EDIT:

If I'm understanding your comments below, you'd have something like this (using the proper selectors of course).

$('mydiv').delegate('seconddiv','hover', function( event ) {
    $(this).toggle( event.type === 'mouseenter' );  
});
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The seconddiv is within the first. When I use mouseover, it disappears once the mouse goes over the seconddiv, which was only displayed once I hovered over mydiv. –  Chris Abrams Jan 23 '11 at 17:56
    
@Chris: Are you saying that when you hover over mydiv, you want its nested seconddiv to show, and then hide when you leave mydiv? Are the mydiv elements part of the page when it loads? Or are they added later? –  user113716 Jan 23 '11 at 18:09
    
seconddiv is nested in the first div. Sometimes mydiv is there on page load, and sometimes it is added after the DOM is loaded. –  Chris Abrams Jan 24 '11 at 0:27
    
@Chris: I think I understand. I'll update and you can let me know If it was what you meant. –  user113716 Jan 24 '11 at 1:08
    
I did not realize that mouseenter was a type to choose from. –  Chris Abrams Jan 27 '11 at 4:14
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.delegate() does not have a handle out. Also, you need the specify the element you are targeting with the first parameter.

You could try something like this, however:

$('table').delegate('tr', 'hover', function() {  
    $(this).toggle();
});
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Works perfect indeed, thanks! –  Peter Smeekens Sep 26 '11 at 13:15
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I know the OP wanted a delegate solution (so was I when I bumped into this question...)

But after further investigation I found out its possible to achieve the same without js/jquery code at all

All you need is a bit of CSS

.someContainer .seconddiv{
    display : none;
}

.someContainer:hover .seconddiv{
    display : block;
}

INMO it a much more efficient/ligthwheigth solution

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This is a nice way of doing it with CSS - when I was having this issue, I needed to fire another JS event once the mouse entered. –  Chris Abrams Feb 18 '13 at 22:22
    
Be careful if you need to interact with something in .seconddiv on a touchscreen device... The ordering of events will fire hover first and then a click into .seconddiv –  parker.sikand Mar 13 '13 at 15:49
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EDIT: misinformation removed.

If you want to use the hover() method without delegation, working code would look like this:

$('#mydiv').hover(function() {  
    $('#seconddiv').show();  
}, function() {  
    $('#seconddiv').hide();  
});

Second of all, delegate is to assign an event handler to a child, so you need to specify a selector first. If you need to make sure this event handler exists for dynamically added elements, I would prefer .live() in this case with mouseenter and mouseleave.

$('#mydiv').live('mouseenter', function() {  
    $('#seconddiv').show();  
}).live('mouseleave', function() {  
    $('#seconddiv').hide();  
});
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jQuery accepts hover as an event type for bind, live and delegate. It maps to mouseenter/mouseleave. –  user113716 Jan 23 '11 at 4:35
    
That's incorrect. hover IS an event type. It's even used as an example for delegate in the jQuery documentation. api.jquery.com/delegate –  Michael Irigoyen Jan 23 '11 at 4:35
    
Thank you. It doesn't show in the API docs for the .bind method, so I didn't realize. –  mVChr Jan 23 '11 at 4:40
    
I was wrong about bind. It is only for live and delegate. –  user113716 Jan 23 '11 at 4:43
    
The second div is nested within the first, and if you hover over the second div, it will disappear. –  Chris Abrams Jan 24 '11 at 0:29
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