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Can anyone point me to a reference or a beginner's tutorial for file handling in C.

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4  
try typing " file handling in C" into a search engine –  Mitch Wheat Jan 23 '11 at 5:11
    
    
@mitch well i tried searching. since im a beginner, wouldn't know the right book for me. thats why i posted a question here :) –  jaykumarark Jan 23 '11 at 5:29
    
nothing wrong with being a beginner; we were all once. BUT being able to search is a pre-requisite –  Mitch Wheat Jan 23 '11 at 6:18
    
@mitch believe me i can search. :) But when i start searching. I keep hopping from one book to another finally i dont learn anything. When i hear it from an expert, its a different thing for me. I would concentrate more on that book and get the basics straight before I move to advanced stuff:) Its all about reading as many techniques as possible :) –  jaykumarark Jan 23 '11 at 6:44

3 Answers 3

$ man fopen
$ man fclose
$ man fread
$ man fwrite
$ man fprintf
$ man fscanf
$ man fflush

And probably all the "see also" parts.

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You open a file with fopen:

FILE *file=fopen("filename", "r"); // opens a file for reading
if(file) {
    // success
}else{
    // error
}

If you replace r with w, then it will be opened for writing. If you include b in the mode string, it will be opened as binary instead of text, which is the default. (in text mode it does some conversions such as line endings and such) If you use r+, it will open it for both reading and writing. If you use w+, it will truncate the file and open it for reading and writing. You can also use a to append to the file.

To read from a file, use fread or fgets:

char buffer[256];
if(fgets(buffer, sizeof(buffer), file)) { // reads a line from the file
    // success
}else{
    // error
}
if(fread(buffer, sizeof(buffer), 1, file)==1) { // reads 256 bytes from the file
    // success
}else{
    // error
}

To write to a file, use fwrite or fputs:

if(fputs("Hello, world!", file)==0) { // writes a line to the file
    // success
}else{
    // error
}
// ---OR---
const char *data="Hello, world!";
if(fwrite(data, sizeof(data), 1, file)==1) { // writes some data to the file
    // success
}else{
    // error
}

Once you're done with a file, you close it with fclose:

if(fclose(file)==0) {
    // success
}else{
    // error
}
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Not a good idea to ignore the return values of fread and fwrite, by the way. –  paxdiablo Jan 23 '11 at 5:25
    
@paxdiablo: That's true. –  icktoofay Jan 23 '11 at 5:27
    
That's better. +1 for keeping it self-contained (on SO) as well. –  paxdiablo Jan 23 '11 at 5:59
    
Hey thanks a lot for the code :) it looks elegant and simple :) –  jaykumarark Jan 23 '11 at 6:45
    
@Jay I'd also like to just point out that with the fread() call, you'll get an error in the code above if the file size isn't exactly divisible by 256 bytes since fread() returns the number of fully-read objects. So, if your file has 128 bytes in it, the example above will return 0 but there will be no error set and feof(file) will return non-zero. –  Jason Coco Jan 23 '11 at 7:01

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