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How can access the property of an object inside generic method?
I can't use where T: A because this method will receive different objects, but all objects have a common property to work on.
(I also can't make for them a common interface)

public class A
{
    public int Number {get;set;}
}


List<A> listA = new List<A>{
                new A {Number =4},
                new A {Number =1},
                new A {Number =5}
};

Work<A>(listA);

public static void Work<T>(List<T> list1)
{
    foreach(T item in list1)
    {
        do something with item.Number;
    }
}

An update: I need also to set the property

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by nawfal, PaRiMaL RaJ, IronMan84, Dan Esparza, afuzzyllama Apr 18 '13 at 13:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
why can't you create an interface? Sounds like a design problem. –  Philipp Jan 23 '11 at 8:01
    
try looking here stackoverflow.com/questions/4292740/… –  Shekhar_Pro Jan 23 '11 at 8:02
    
An interface should be the answer otherwise you should test the class in your foreach. –  Kees C. Bakker Jan 23 '11 at 8:07

2 Answers 2

You have a few choices:

  • Make a common interface.
  • Use reflection.
  • Use the dynamic type in .NET 4.

I know you said you can't do the first, but it's the best option for performance and maintainability so please reconsider if its possible before choosing one of the other methods. Remember that even if you can't modify the original code you might still be able to choose the first option. For example if your classes are partial classes you can implement the interface in another file:

File 1:

// Automatically generated code that you can't change.
partial class A
{
    public int Number { get; set; }
}

File 2:

interface IHasNumber
{
    int Number { get; set; }
}

partial class A : IHasNumber
{
}

If the original class isn't defined as partial you could write wrapper classes around them that implement the interface.

Once you have the common interface you can change your generic constraint to require this interface:

where T : IHasNumber
share|improve this answer
    
third option - i use net 3.5. , p.s. the objects I pass are entityobjects if it helps. –  asker Jan 23 '11 at 8:02
    
?? How would using .net 3.5 change anything? –  Pierreten Jan 23 '11 at 8:08
    
Pierreten, if you look on his answer you'll see "Use the dynamic type in .NET 4." –  asker Jan 23 '11 at 8:15
    
@asker: It was only that one line that is specific to .NET 4. The rest of the answer all applies to .NET 3.5. –  Mark Byers Jan 23 '11 at 8:25
    
@ Mark Byers, sure thing I notted "third option - i use net 3.5" –  asker Jan 23 '11 at 8:39

If you don't need the list - just the items, I would use a projection outside the method:

static void Main()
{
    List<A> listA = new List<A>{
            new A {Number =4},
            new A {Number =1},
            new A {Number =5}
    };

    Work(listA.Select(a => a.Number));

}
public static void Work(IEnumerable<int> items)
{
    foreach (number item in items)
    {
        // do something with number;
    }
}

If you need the list - a projection inside the method via a selector:

static void Main()
{
    List<A> listA = new List<A>{
            new A {Number =4},
            new A {Number =1},
            new A {Number =5}
    };

    Work(listA, a => a.Number);

}
public static void Work<T>(IList<T> list, Func<T, int> selector)
{
    foreach (T obj in list)
    {
        int number = selector(obj);
        // do something with number;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
with projection I can only get and not to set the property? –  asker Jan 23 '11 at 10:21
    
@asker - yes, but if you wanted to set them you should perhaps have said that in the question? "do something with item.Number;" is a bit vague... –  Marc Gravell Jan 23 '11 at 10:36
    
sorry, I need also setting –  asker Jan 23 '11 at 11:35

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