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I tried things found here and elsewhere but seem to be stuck. Here's what I want to do: clicking on a link should

  1. toggle its parent elements class
  2. send an ajax request via GET with the link's id and title and change the title to the response

I figured out #1 and am able in #2 to send the ajax request (and perform whatever the called file should do and its response is also good) but I'm struggling to "attach" the response to the title.

Here is my HTML code

<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.4.3/jquery.min.js"></script>          
<script type="text/javascript">                                         
 $(document).ready(function() {
  $('li div.toggle a').click(function() {
   $.get(
    "test1.php",
    { id: $(this).attr('id'), title: $(this).attr('title') },
    function(data) {
     $.title = data;
    },
    "text");
   $(this).attr('title', $.title);
   $(this).closest('li').toggleClass('highlight');
  });
 });
</script>  
<style type="text/css" media="screen">
 .highlight {
 background: red;
}
</style>
</head>
<body>
<ul>
<li>
 <div>1</div>
 <div class="toggle"><a href="#" id="1" title="this is off">Toggle</a></div>
</li>
<li class="highlight">
 <div>2</div>
 <div class="toggle"><a href="#" id="2" title="this is on">Toggle</a></div>
</li>
</ul>
</body>
</html>

I tried instead of the $.title = data; to use $(this).attr('title', data); directly but that doesn't work - my guess is that $(this) at that stage in the script is not the <a> tag, but I don't know enough jQuery to understand how to "pick" the proper <a> tag differently. Anyway, the strange thing is that it works like this - but only every other time! So click changes the class but not the title, the next click changes the class again and now also the title...

I then tried it by calling the <a> element via its id and I hardcoded it - then it works every time: $('#1').attr('title', data); but of course I would need use the correct id depending on which link was clicked - but I don't know how to get it here.

Here is the test1.php code of the file that is called

<?php
if (substr($_GET['title'], -2)=="on") {
 $result = "off";
}
else {
 $result = "on";
}
print "this is ".$result;
?>

My guess is that I don't fully understand jQuery and that I'm just missing something very simple/basic here. Thanks in advance for looking.

j.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

the problem is that the $.get is asynchronous. so the $(this).attr('title', $.title); is executed right after the ajax request. but before the response.

try setting the title in the callback function:

   $.get(
    "test1.php",
    { id: $(this).attr('id'), title: $(this).attr('title') },
    function(data) {

        $(this).attr('title', data);
    },
    "text");
share|improve this answer

Thanks but that does not work. I had tried all this before. I tried to assign the value directly in the callback but it doesn't work. Putting the toggleClass leads to it not working either anymore. My guess is that it has to do with $(this) not being correct anymore in the callback. If I assigned it directly to the element via its id, it does work $('#1').attr('title', data); but obviously that doesn't work with having more than one link to click.

Let me try to explain. This does not work:

$.get(
    "test1.php",
    { id: $(this).attr('id'), title: $(this).attr('title') },
    function(data) {
     $(this).attr('title', data);
    },

This does work:

$.get(
    "test1.php",
    { id: $(this).attr('id'), title: $(this).attr('title') },
    function(data) {
     $('#1').attr('title', data);
    },

By the way: putting the $(this).closest('li').toggleClass('highlight'); inside the callback function produces a g.nodeName is undefined error in Firebug.

So maybe to approach it differently: what would the best way be to be able to have the element's id available? I'm guessing it's some basic jQuery way ... after fiddling around with it for a bit I came to this which works - YAY

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('li div.toggle a').click(function() {
        var elementId = '#'+$(this).attr('id');
        $.get(
            "test1.php",
            { id: $(this).attr('id'), title: $(this).attr('title') },
            function(data) {
                $(elementId).attr('title', data);
            },
            "text");
        $(this).closest('li').toggleClass('highlight');
        return false;
    });
 });

Nevertheless - thank you very much for your ideas. They led me into the right direction. And possibly there is a better or more elegant way of doing this. If so, I'd be very interested in it!

share|improve this answer
    
sorry for overlooking the $(this) issue. Check my revised answer above: you can store the value of $(this) in a variable (typically named $this), and then call it inside your callback function. Congrats on finding a workaround though, and good luck with your project. –  alegscogs Jan 23 '11 at 22:57

You have to put this:

$(this).attr('title', $.title);
$(this).closest('li').toggleClass('highlight');

inside the success callback, which in your case is

function(data) {
 $.title = data;
},

Also, you are assigning title to the global jQuery object, which seems like a bad idea. If you want to store it in a variable, use a local variable:

var title = data;

instead of:

$.title = data;

But in any case you should in this case be able to assign the value directly in the callback, as you tried before, unsuccessfully (because you were calling the data parameter outside of its scope).

You noted that this is no longer set to the jquery object when the callback is run. To fix this, set a variable explicitly outside of the callback, and then refer to it inside

So, putting the code in its correct scope, and assigning this to an explicit value, it should look something like this:

var $this = $(this);
$.get({
  ...
  function(data) {
    $this.attr('title', data);
    $this.closest('li').toggleClass('highlight');
  },
  ...
});

The problem you are having here is that the anonymous 'callback' function to which $.get() is passing the data parameter, does not get executed until after the ajax call is complete. So the little bit of code inside your function declaration

function(data) { ... }

doesn't get run in the order it is written. This is why the first 'A' in AJAX stands for 'Asynchronous'. The code after that function will get run at the same time as the other code, which is why your highlight is always working.

The reason the title attribute only changed every other time, is that your success callback is assigning the value of data to a globally accessible object, the $ object. That means you can access that value outside of the scope of the function where you assign it (in this case, the callback). However, you can only access it once it has been set! Since it isn't set until after the AJAX response comes back from the server, $.title will be 'undefined' until that action is complete. My guess is that the AJAX call completed in between your first and second clicks.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that Andy suggests essentially the same thing below, in fewer words. He moves the code that changes the title attribute into the callback function. Whether you want to leave the highlight business in the the synchronous code or move it into the success callback depends on when you want it to execute. –  alegscogs Jan 23 '11 at 15:30

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