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  1. Session ID is stored on the client in a way that usually dissipates when the browser is closed (stored as a cookie?).
  2. Session ID and associated data is stored on the server (where?) for each client that starts one.

The main thing I wonder about is how the server knows when a session has ended, though. If the client no longer has the session ID stored (say, after closing their browser) and they try to ask the server for another session, it starts a new session. Does the server know to garbage collect the previous session data after some set amount of time? It seems to me like something that could be abused...

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Server don't know when a session has been ended. Server assumes it by time of user's inactivity, 24 min by default. –  Your Common Sense Jan 23 '11 at 12:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. Session ID is usually stored on client browser using a cookie (alternatively, in URL parameters, but this is not recommended, as explained in http://php.net/manual/en/session.security.php)
  2. Sessions are stored in the directory defined by session.save_path (e.g. /var/lib/php/sessions), or the system's temporary directory if this is not set (usually /tmp).

Sessions are garbage collected periodically, either by PHP itself during a request, or by a cron job (e.g. on Debian this is the default). See http://php.net/manual/en/session.configuration.php#ini.session.gc-probability

The main thing I wonder about is how the server knows when a session has ended

He doesn't know. However he knows when a session has not been used since a certain period of time, so it can delete unused sessions.

Does the server know to garbage collect the previous session data after some set amount of time?

Yes. This is defined by the session.gc_maxlifetime ini setting. Any session older than that will be deleted during a garbage collect. Garbage collect frequency can be tuned with the session.gc_probability and session.gc_divisor ini settings. (See doc.)

It seems to me like something that could be abused.

If you mean that someone may be able to create too many staled sessions on the server; yes this is probably true.

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what you describe is perfectly right. And yes, it can be abused easily. There's even a tool out that automatically hijacks sessions around you (search for firesheep). The sessions are usually stored as either SESSION cookies or are passed between sever and client each time.
Check the PHP for a very brief intro, and some google on session and security will get you further.

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This is true with any session mechanism, as long as you don't use HTTPS. –  arnaud576875 Jan 23 '11 at 12:45

Sessions expire automatically and are cleared up depending on the settings (after 20 days of no usage for example) and they are stored on linux, usually under /tmp/

Check php.ini for more information

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er... twenty days? –  Your Common Sense Jan 23 '11 at 12:40
    
it depends on the configuration of the server, it may be longer –  Joe Simpson Jan 23 '11 at 12:40
    
OMG, "it may be longer"! –  Your Common Sense Jan 23 '11 at 12:43
    
The default is around 24 minutes, not any number of days. 20 days of session files on one of my sites would exceed the number of files allowed in a directory and fill the partition! –  Dan Grossman Jan 23 '11 at 12:49

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