Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have these files in a folder:

chap11-solutions.pdf
chap12-solutions.pdf
chap13-solutions.pdf
chap14-solutions.pdf
chap15-solutions.pdf
chap16-solutions.pdf
chap17-solutions.pdf
chap21-solutions.pdf
chap22-solutions.pdf
chap23-solutions.pdf
chap24-solutions.pdf
chap25-solutions.pdf
chap26-solutions.pdf
chap2-solutions.pdf
chap3-solutions.pdf
chap4-solutions.pdf
chap5-solutions.pdf
chap6-solutions.pdf
chap7-solutions.pdf
chap8-solutions.pdf
chap9-solutions.pdf

how do I sort them in this way: chap1..., chap...2, ...., chap11..., chap12,... using Ubuntu bash shell? Thanks.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted
ls|sort -V

The -V parameter ensures that chap10 is considered upper that chap9.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That works like a charm. –  wakandan Jan 23 '11 at 13:21
2  
Just be aware that the -V option works only for relatively new GNU coreutils - it doesn't work for 5.93 (the one that's shipped by default with Mac OS 10.6). –  Tomasz Elendt Jan 23 '11 at 13:33
    
OP uses Ubuntu, so he likely have a recent GNU coreutils :) –  arnaud576875 Jan 23 '11 at 13:38

GNU ls has a version sort built-in:

ls -lv
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for this new very useful info, I never know this old tool got that handful switch. :D –  wakandan Jan 24 '11 at 7:09

If you have ruby(1.9.1+)

ruby -e 'puts Dir["chap*pdf"].sort_by{|x|x[/\d+/].to_i}'
share|improve this answer
    
One more nice thing about Ruby. Thanks for the info. Good luck in so.com. :D –  wakandan Jan 24 '11 at 7:13

Assuming that you want to rename the files so you don't have to keep sorting them later:

for f in chap*-solutions.pdf; do num=`echo $f | grep -o "[0123456789]\+"`; two_num=`printf "%02d" $num`; mv $f chap$two_num-solutions.pdf; done
  • grep -o "[0123456789]+" outputs the chapter number (one or two digits)
  • printf returns a string that contains the zero-padded number
share|improve this answer
1  
And this is what they call "thoughtful". It touched my intention of renaming some files. Thanks a lot :D –  wakandan Jan 24 '11 at 7:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.