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I already read about realpath(), but is there a function that I can pass a base directory and a filename that would give me the following result without resolving symlinks or checking whether files actually exist? Or do I have to use a modified realpath()?

"/var/", "../etc///././/passwd" => "/etc/passwd"
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2  
what should be the result of "/dir/a_random_synlink/../hello" ? remember that it may not be the same thing as "/dir/hello" if a_random_synlink doesn't point to a directory in the same directory –  BatchyX Jan 23 '11 at 15:46
    
@BatchyX: Seems to be standard behaviour: readlink -v -m '/home/user/linktoslashtmp/../' returns /home/user –  thejh Jan 23 '11 at 16:09
1  
maybe readlink does this, but the underlying OS does not. ls /home/user/linktoslashtmp/../ lists the content of / –  BatchyX Jan 23 '11 at 16:20
    
@BatchyX is correct, performing this "normalisation" will mean that the before and after paths do not necessarily open the same file anymore. –  caf Jan 23 '11 at 23:59
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here is a normalize_path() function:

If the given path is relative, the function starts by prepending the current working directory to it.

Then the special path components like .., . or empty components are treated, and the result is returned.

For .., the last component is removed if there is one (/.. will just return /).
For . or empty components (double /), this is just skipped.

The function ensures to not return empty an path (/ is returned instead).

#define _GNU_SOURCE /* memrchr() */

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <limits.h>

char * normalize_path(const char * src, size_t src_len) {

        char * res;
        size_t res_len;

        const char * ptr = src;
        const char * end = &src[src_len];
        const char * next;

        if (src_len == 0 || src[0] != '/') {

                // relative path

                char pwd[PATH_MAX];
                size_t pwd_len;

                if (getcwd(pwd, sizeof(pwd)) == NULL) {
                        return NULL;
                }

                pwd_len = strlen(pwd);
                res = malloc(pwd_len + 1 + src_len + 1);
                memcpy(res, pwd, pwd_len);
                res_len = pwd_len;
        } else {
                res = malloc((src_len > 0 ? src_len : 1) + 1);
                res_len = 0;
        }

        for (ptr = src; ptr < end; ptr=next+1) {
                size_t len;
                next = memchr(ptr, '/', end-ptr);
                if (next == NULL) {
                        next = end;
                }
                len = next-ptr;
                switch(len) {
                case 2:
                        if (ptr[0] == '.' && ptr[1] == '.') {
                                const char * slash = memrchr(res, '/', res_len);
                                if (slash != NULL) {
                                        res_len = slash - res;
                                }
                                continue;
                        }
                        break;
                case 1:
                        if (ptr[0] == '.') {
                                continue;

                        }
                        break;
                case 0:
                        continue;
                }
                res[res_len++] = '/';
                memcpy(&res[res_len], ptr, len);
                res_len += len;
        }

        if (res_len == 0) {
                res[res_len++] = '/';
        }
        res[res_len] = '\0';
        return res;
}
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+1: That seems to work well for the case where the path is evaluated relative to the current directory. Strictly, I think the interpretation of the question is "evaluate the path ../etc///././passwd relative to /var/", which is a simple variation on your theme (you don't need to establish the current directory with getcwd(); you use the value passed by the user). –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 23 '11 at 16:02
    
Thanks, looks good - I modified the function a little bit to accept a pwd parameter. –  thejh Jan 23 '11 at 17:44
    
Sure, I give you the permission –  arnaud576875 Jan 23 '11 at 18:00
    
@user576875 Can you give me the permission to use it in a GPL-licensed project if I write that the function was written by you? –  thejh Jan 23 '11 at 18:00
    
@user576875 Thank you! –  thejh Jan 23 '11 at 18:01
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function normalize_path($path, $pwd = '/') {
        if (!isset($path[0]) || $path[0] !== '/') {
                $result = explode('/', getcwd());
        } else {
                $result = array('');
        }
        $parts = explode('/', $path);
        foreach($parts as $part) {
            if ($part === '' || $part == '.') {
                    continue;
            } if ($part == '..') {
                    array_pop($result);
            } else {
                    $result[] = $part;
            }
        }
        return implode('/', $result);
}

(The question was tagged PHP at the time I wrote this.)

Anyway, here is a regex version:

function normalize_path($path, $pwd = '/') {
        if (!isset($path[0]) || $path[0] !== '/') {
                $path = "$pwd/$path";
        }
        return preg_replace('~
                ^(?P>sdotdot)?(?:(?P>sdot)*/\.\.)*
                |(?<sdotdot>(?:(?P>sdot)*/(?!\.\.)(?:[^/]+)(?P>sdotdot)?(?P>sdot)*/\.\.)+)
                |(?<sdot>/\.?(?=/|$))+
        ~sx', '', $path);
}
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Yes, it was tagged with no language, somebody put "php" on it and I changed it to "c" - sorry for forgetting that tag. –  thejh Jan 23 '11 at 13:52
    
@user576875 @thejh My bad (I tagged it as PHP). Should have checked your recent questions first. Apologies to all. –  middaparka Jan 23 '11 at 13:55
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