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I have a javascript function which checks to see if an artist exists in an XML file:

function artistExists(artist) {
// get data from artists.xml 
$('.loading').show();
$.get(artists_xml, function(xml){  
    $('.loading').hide();
    $(xml).find('artist').each(function(){
        if ($(this).find("ar_artist").text() == artist.val()) {
            alert ('artist exists');
            return true;
        } //end if
    });  // end each
    alert ('artist does not exist');
    return false;
}); // end .get function
} // end of artistExists function

Am I right in thinking that the 'return true' line should quit execution of the function? I thought it would, but after finding a record and running the first alert execution continues to the failure alert at the bottom.

What am I doing wrong please? Thank you.

share|improve this question

Return false, rather than true, to terminate the each loop; from the docs:

We can stop the loop from within the callback function by returning false.

That will just terminate your each loop, though, not the overall function. You'll need to set a flag so you know whether you found something, e.g. something like this:

function artistExists(artist) {
// get data from artists.xml 
$('.loading').show();
$.get(artists_xml, function(xml){  
    var found = false;    // <== Added
    $('.loading').hide();
    $(xml).find('artist').each(function(){
        if ($(this).find("ar_artist").text() == artist.val()) {
            alert ('artist exists');
            found = true; // <== Added
            return false; // <== Modified
        } //end if
    });  // end each
    if (!found) {         // <== Added
        alert ('artist does not exist');
    }                     // <== Added
    return found;         // <== Modified
}); // end .get function
} // end of artistExists function
share|improve this answer
    
It's been a long long time, but I have a question about it: I tried to use return only and it stopped the .each, so is return false not a must-do or is there something I should know? – Cagatay Ulubay May 13 '15 at 10:04
1  
@CagatayUlubay: Just return won't stop the each loop, it just jumps out of the callback for that one iteration; the loop will continue with the next iteration. return false will jump out of the callback for that iteration and stop looping. – T.J. Crowder May 13 '15 at 10:14

Yes, it does "quit" execution of the function. The question is, "which function?" In this case the answer should be pretty clear: it's the function passed to .each().

You can terminate the looping behavior of .each() by returning false instead of true, but that still won't get you out of the outer function. What you should probably consider is to set up a local variable in the outer function, and have the inner function set that when it finds something (and then break the .each() loop). Then the main function can check the local variable to see if it was set.

This is a case where I'd really like to use a .reduce() or .inject() API, but jQuery doesn't have one and they're really opposed to it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Pointy, it works, though it does seem a bit clunky doesn't it. It'd be great if could put numbers after a break statement. – RichJohnstone Jan 23 '11 at 15:04
    
Well the problem is that when your functions are first-class values like in JavaScript, the "static" arrangement of the code really doesn't tell you much about how/when/where a function will actually be called. – Pointy Jan 23 '11 at 15:28

$.get is an asynchronous function, that means, the main function, artistExists will return immediately, and a GET request will be initiated. To be able to get the result you will need a callback.

function artistExists(artist, cb) {
    $('.loading').show();
    $.get(artists_xml, function(xml) {

        var found = false;

        $('.loading').hide();

        $(xml).find('artist').each(function(){
            if ($(this).find("ar_artist").text() == artist.val()) {
                found = true;
                return false; // use return false to stop .each()
            }
        });

        // the built in action.
        if (found) {
            alert ('artist exists');
        } else {
            alert ('artist does not exist');
        }

        // call the callback function
        cb (found);

    });
}

Then to use, you need to use a callback function. From

var isExists = artistExists('lol');
// do stuff

You need to change it to:

artistExists('lol', function(isExists) {
    // do stuff
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this Thai - on refection this is obviously the way to go. I just don't quite understand how to use it in my code, I'm new and I've never used a callback before. I wanted to be able to have a line of code like "if (artistExists($('#artistfield'))) { // do stuff }". How would I go about this with the callback business please? Thanks very much. – RichJohnstone Jan 23 '11 at 17:07
    
An asynchronous function means a function that you can't get the result instantly when you call. A callback function is important so that you can be notified when the result is available. If you take a look, the artistExists function accepts another argument cb, and cb is called after we have the result on cb(found). – Thai Jan 24 '11 at 0:48
    
thanks again Thai. I understand that the asynchronous nature of the request means I have to wait for the result. What I'm not clear about is how i use my cb/callback function to pass true/false back to my original calling line of code. If you could help me with a bit of code here I'd be really grateful. thanks again. – RichJohnstone Jan 24 '11 at 8:49
    
It is higher order programming, where you pass pass a piece of code as values (in JavaScript, it is a function). Then a code can call it like any other functions, so you can call it like the way you do in $.get('url', function(response){ ... }) or $(document).ready(function(){ ... }). I recommend that you read a bit about functional programming: Functional Programming -- Eloquent JavaScript – Thai Jan 24 '11 at 11:15
    
Thanks Thai, that'll make for some interesting and well needed reading. – RichJohnstone Jan 24 '11 at 17:19

Thanks for all the advice. In the end I decided I needed a synchronous call, so I made the following new version of the .get function, called .sget:

    jQuery.extend({
sget: function( url, callback, type ) {
        return jQuery.ajax({
            type:       "GET",
            url:        url,
            success:    callback,
            async:      false,
            dataType:   type
        });
    }
});

The 'async: false' pair in the 'ajax' options makes the call synchronous. Then the following edit of my original failing function:

function artistExists(artistname) {
var found = false;
console.log("From Input:Artist= " + artistname.val());
// get data from artists.xml
$('.loading').show();
$.sget(artists_xml, function(xml){  // new synchronous get
    $('.loading').hide();
    $(xml).find('artist').each(function(){
        if ($(this).find("ar_artist").text() == artistname.val()) {
            console.log('From File:Artist= ' + $(this).find("ar_artist").text());
            found = true;
            console.log("In each loop:Flag= " + found);
            return;
        } //end if
    });  // end each
}); // end .get function
console.log("At end:Flag= " + found);
return found;

}

The console.log lines will be removed. They show though, that things are now happening in the order I want. SO the new synchronous .sget function and the use of a 'found' flag, as advised above, have done the trick for me. Don't know why I couldn't think of doing this yesterday.

Thanks everyone.

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