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Is there a way to step between 0 and 1 by 0.1?

I thought I could do it like the following, but it failed:

for i in range(0, 1, 0.1):
    print i

Instead, it says that the step argument cannot be zero, which it's not.

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9  
int(0.1) == 0, so the step actually is zero. It may be unexpected, but it is zero. You might want to restate your question to reflect that fact that it's you didn't expect this. Saying "it's not" is false and misleading. –  S.Lott Jan 25 '09 at 13:34
1  
BTW A short one-liner can be rolled up using itertools.takewhile and itertools.count. It isn't better than drange performance-wise, though. –  Kos Nov 29 '12 at 16:15

21 Answers 21

up vote 85 down vote accepted

Building on 'xrange([start], stop[, step])', you can define a generator that accepts and produces any type you choose (stick to types supporting + and <):

>>> def drange(start, stop, step):
...     r = start
...     while r < stop:
...     	yield r
...     	r += step
...     	
>>> i0=drange(0.0, 1.0, 0.1)
>>> ["%g" % x for x in i0]
['0', '0.1', '0.2', '0.3', '0.4', '0.5', '0.6', '0.7', '0.8', '0.9', '1']
>>>
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18  
This has roundoff problems. Please look here: code.activestate.com/recipes/66472 –  Christian Oudard Oct 12 '09 at 20:50
    
I would extend it a bit for the other direction with a (while r > stop) and a corresponding r -= step for giving the opposite direction. –  user318904 Nov 8 '10 at 3:59
4  
drange? Such subtle irony :) –  zourtney Aug 7 '13 at 1:58
    
yours for: l=frange(0,1,0.1) print l returns: [0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.30000000000000004, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6000000000000001, 0.7000000000000001, 0.8, 0.9] while numpy: [ 0. 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9] –  andi Sep 5 '13 at 14:20
1  
I did a xfrange function without the float precision problems referred above. Check it out ;) stackoverflow.com/questions/477486/… –  carlosvega Dec 12 '13 at 17:05

You can also use the NumPy library (which isn't part of standard library but is relatively easy to obtain) which has the arange function:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> np.arange(0,1,0.1)
array([ 0. ,  0.1,  0.2,  0.3,  0.4,  0.5,  0.6,  0.7,  0.8,  0.9])

as well as the linspace function which lets you have control over what happens at the endpoint (non-trivial for floating point numbers when things won't always divide into the correct number of "slices"):

>>> np.linspace(0,1,11)
array([ 0. ,  0.1,  0.2,  0.3,  0.4,  0.5,  0.6,  0.7,  0.8,  0.9,  1. ])
>>> np.linspace(0,1,10,endpoint=False)
array([ 0. ,  0.1,  0.2,  0.3,  0.4,  0.5,  0.6,  0.7,  0.8,  0.9])
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6  
numpy is such an ubiquitous component of python that I consider this answer to be the most 'pythonic' of all. –  André Terra Sep 11 '13 at 19:20

Python's range() can only do integers, not floating point. In your specific case, you can use a list comprehension instead:

[x * 0.1 for x in range(0, 10)]

(Replace the call to range with that expression.)

For the more general case, you may want to write a custom function or generator.

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12  
Even better, you could just use a generator comprehension if you're working with Python 2.4+. (x * 0.1 for x in range(0, 10)). –  JAB Jun 25 '10 at 18:02
3  
Even better, put x/10 instead of x * 0.1 :D Nothing special actually, but some numbers in there will be more precise, e.g. for 3*0.1 you get 0.30000000000000004, while for 3/10 you get 0.3 :) –  Bloke May 26 '12 at 18:22
1  
3/10 gives me 0, not 0.3. 3/10.0 gives 0.29999999999999999. Python 2.6. –  Lars Wirzenius May 27 '12 at 8:19
6  
@LarsWirzenius: in Python 2.2+, from __future__ import division; 3/10 returns 0.3. This behaviour is the default in Python 3.x. –  Benjamin Hodgson Sep 14 '12 at 11:15
1  
round function can also be used lst = [round(x* 0.10,2) for x in range(0,10)] –  Raza Jan 30 at 8:34

Increase the magnitude of i for the loop and then reduce it when you need it.

for i * 100 in range(0, 100, 10):
    print i / 100.0
share|improve this answer
    
I think you'll find that range() works off integers, in which case this would be the only solution, using the same function atleast. –  Matthew Scharley Jan 25 '09 at 10:33
1  
@cmsjr creative :D Just one little thing: divide by 100.0 to keep Python from truncating the result if you're using Python 2.x. I think in 3.0, it'll work as you've coded it. –  Dana Jan 25 '09 at 10:35
    
Nice, thanks alot, I'll make the edit. –  cmsjr Jan 25 '09 at 10:36

Similar to R's seq function, this one returns a sequence in any order given the correct step value. The last value is equal to the stop value.

def seq(start, stop, step=1):
    n = int(round((stop - start)/float(step)))
    if n > 1:
        return([start + step*i for i in range(n+1)])
    else:
        return([])

Results

seq(1, 5, 0.5)

[1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, 5.0]

seq(10, 0, -1)

[10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0]

seq(10, 0, -2)

[10, 8, 6, 4, 2, 0]

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This is a great answer for someone who wants to get it one without getting too much into python. –  Wildling Aug 3 at 11:40

The range() built-in function returns a sequence of integer values, I'm afraid, so you can't use it to do a decimal step.

I'd say just use a while loop:

i = 0.0
while i <= 1.0:
    print i
    i += 0.1

If you're curious, Python is converting your 0.1 to 0, which is why it's telling you the argument can't be zero.

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scipy has a built in function arange which generalizes Python's range() constructor to satisfy your requirement of float handling.

from scipy import arange

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oh that's good! love arange –  Plug4 Jul 3 at 9:17
import numpy as np
for i in np.arange(0, 1, 0.1): 
    print i 
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And if you do this often, you might want to save the generated list r

r=map(lambda x: x/10.0,range(0,10))
for i in r:
    print i
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[x * 0.1 for x in range(0, 10)] 

in Python 2.7x gives you the result of:

[0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.30000000000000004, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6000000000000001, 0.7000000000000001, 0.8, 0.9]

but if you use:

[ round(x * 0.1, 1) for x in range(0, 10)]

gives you the desired:

[0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9]

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My versions use the original range function to create multiplicative indices for the shift. This allows same syntax to the original range function. I have made two versions, one using float, and one using Decimal, because I found that in some cases I wanted to avoid the roundoff drift introduced by the floating point arithmetic.

It is consistent with empty set results as in range/xrange.

Passing only a single numeric value to either function will return the standard range output to the integer ceiling value of the input parameter (so if you gave it 5.5, it would return range(6).)

Edit: the code below is now available as package on pypi: Franges

## frange.py
from math import ceil
# find best range function available to version (2.7.x / 3.x.x)
try:
    _xrange = xrange
except NameError:
    _xrange = range

def frange(start, stop = None, step = 1):
    """frange generates a set of floating point values over the 
    range [start, stop) with step size step

    frange([start,] stop [, step ])"""

    if stop is None:
        for x in _xrange(int(ceil(start))):
            yield x
    else:
        # create a generator expression for the index values
        indices = (i for i in _xrange(0, int((stop-start)/step)))  
        # yield results
        for i in indices:
            yield start + step*i

## drange.py
import decimal
from math import ceil
# find best range function available to version (2.7.x / 3.x.x)
try:
    _xrange = xrange
except NameError:
    _xrange = range

def drange(start, stop = None, step = 1, precision = None):
    """drange generates a set of Decimal values over the
    range [start, stop) with step size step

    drange([start,] stop, [step [,precision]])"""

    if stop is None:
        for x in _xrange(int(ceil(start))):
            yield x
    else:
        # find precision
        if precision is not None:
            decimal.getcontext().prec = precision
        # convert values to decimals
        start = decimal.Decimal(start)
        stop = decimal.Decimal(stop)
        step = decimal.Decimal(step)
        # create a generator expression for the index values
        indices = (
            i for i in _xrange(
                0, 
                ((stop-start)/step).to_integral_value()
            )
        )  
        # yield results
        for i in indices:
            yield float(start + step*i)

## testranges.py
import frange
import drange
list(frange.frange(0, 2, 0.5)) # [0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5]
list(drange.drange(0, 2, 0.5, precision = 6)) # [0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5]
list(frange.frange(3)) # [0, 1, 2]
list(frange.frange(3.5)) # [0, 1, 2, 3]
list(frange.frange(0,10, -1)) # []
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This is my solution to get ranges with float steps.
Using this function it's not necessary to import numpy, nor install it.
I'm pretty sure that it could be improved and optimized. Feel free to do it and post it here.

from __future__ import division
from math import log

def xfrange(start, stop, step):

    old_start = start #backup this value

    digits = int(round(log(10000, 10)))+1 #get number of digits
    magnitude = 10**digits
    stop = int(magnitude * stop) #convert from 
    step = int(magnitude * step) #0.1 to 10 (e.g.)

    if start == 0:
        start = 10**(digits-1)
    else:
        start = 10**(digits)*start

    data = []   #create array

    #calc number of iterations
    end_loop = int((stop-start)//step)
    if old_start == 0:
        end_loop += 1

    acc = start

    for i in xrange(0, end_loop):
        data.append(acc/magnitude)
        acc += step

    return data

print xfrange(1, 2.1, 0.1)
print xfrange(0, 1.1, 0.1)
print xfrange(-1, 0.1, 0.1)

The output is:

[1.0, 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8, 1.9, 2.0]
[0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9, 1.0, 1.1]
[-1.0, -0.9, -0.8, -0.7, -0.6, -0.5, -0.4, -0.3, -0.2, -0.1, 0.0]
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There is an error with missing the last value if it is within 1 step of the stop value. i.e. xfrange(1,10,2) only does 1,3,5,7, missing 9 –  Lobe May 25 at 1:39

The Python Cookbook has a recipe for this: http://code.activestate.com/recipes/66472/

Be sure to check the comments; they include improved versions and discussion of errors (for example, gimel's solution may accumulate errors due to repeated addition of floating point numbers).

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You can use this function:

def frange(start,end,step):
    return map(lambda x: x*step, range(int(start*1./step),int(end*1./step)))
share|improve this answer

Here's a solution using itertools:

import itertools

def seq(start, end, step):
    assert(step != 0)
    sample_count = (end - start) / step
    return itertools.islice(itertools.count(start, step), sample_count)

Usage Example:

for i in seq(0, 1, 0.1):
    print i

Output:

0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
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Add auto-correction for the possibility of an incorrect sign on step:

def frange(start,step,stop):
    step *= 2*((stop>start)^(step<0))-1
    return [start+i*step for i in range(int((stop-start)/step))]
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My solution:

def seq(start, stop, step=1, digit=0):
    x = float(start)
    v = []
    while x <= stop:
        v.append(round(x,digit))
        x += step
    return v
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Here is my solution which works fine with float_range(-1, 0, 0.01) and works without floating point representation errors. It is not very fast, but works fine:

from decimal import Decimal

def get_multiplier(_from, _to, step):
    digits = []
    for number in [_from, _to, step]:
        pre = Decimal(str(number)) % 1
        digit = len(str(pre)) - 2
        digits.append(digit)
    max_digits = max(digits)
    return float(10 ** (max_digits))


def float_range(_from, _to, step, include=False):
    """Generates a range list of floating point values over the Range [start, stop]
       with step size step
       include=True - allows to include right value to if possible
       !! Works fine with floating point representation !!
    """
    mult = get_multiplier(_from, _to, step)
    # print mult
    int_from = int(round(_from * mult))
    int_to = int(round(_to * mult))
    int_step = int(round(step * mult))
    # print int_from,int_to,int_step
    if include:
        result = range(int_from, int_to + int_step, int_step)
        result = [r for r in result if r <= int_to]
    else:
        result = range(int_from, int_to, int_step)
    # print result
    float_result = [r / mult for r in result]
    return float_result


print float_range(-1, 0, 0.01,include=False)

assert float_range(1.01, 2.06, 5.05 % 1, True) ==\
[1.01, 1.06, 1.11, 1.16, 1.21, 1.26, 1.31, 1.36, 1.41, 1.46, 1.51, 1.56, 1.61, 1.66, 1.71, 1.76, 1.81, 1.86, 1.91, 1.96, 2.01, 2.06]

assert float_range(1.01, 2.06, 5.05 % 1, False)==\
[1.01, 1.06, 1.11, 1.16, 1.21, 1.26, 1.31, 1.36, 1.41, 1.46, 1.51, 1.56, 1.61, 1.66, 1.71, 1.76, 1.81, 1.86, 1.91, 1.96, 2.01]
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I am only a beginner, but I had the same problem, when simulating some calculations. Here is how I attempted to work this out, which seems to be working with decimal steps.

I am also quite lazy and so I found it hard to write my own range function.

Basically what I did is changed my xrange(0.0, 1.0, 0.01) to xrange(0, 100, 1) and used the division by 100.0 inside the loop. I was also concerned, if there will be rounding mistakes. So I decided to test, whether there are any. Now I heard, that if for example 0.01 from a calculation isn't exactly the float 0.01 comparing them should return False (if I am wrong, please let me know).

So I decided to test if my solution will work for my range by running a short test:

for d100 in xrange(0, 100, 1):
    d = d100 / 100.0
    fl = float("0.00"[:4 - len(str(d100))] + str(d100))
    print d, "=", fl , d == fl

And it printed True for each.

Now, if I'm getting it totally wrong, please let me know.

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This one liner will not clutter your code. The sign of the step parameter is important.

def frange(start, stop, step):
    return [x*step+start for x in range(0,round(abs((stop-start)/step)+0.5001),
        int((stop-start)/step<0)*-2+1)]
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frange(start, stop, precision)

def frange(a,b,i):
    p = 10**i
    sr = a*p
    er = (b*p) + 1
    p = float(p)
    return map(lambda x: x/p, xrange(sr,er))

In >frange(-1,1,1)

Out>[-1.0, -0.9, -0.8, -0.7, -0.6, -0.5, -0.4, -0.3, -0.2, -0.1, 0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9, 1.0]
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