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Anyone have a quick method for de-duplicating a generic List in C#?

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18 Answers 18

up vote 124 down vote accepted

Perhaps you should consider using a HashSet?

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4  
its unbelievable fast... 100.000 strings with List takes 400s and 8MB ram, my own solution takes 2.5s and 28MB, hashset takes 0.1s!!! and 11MB ram –  sasjaq Mar 25 '13 at 22:28
    
HashSet doesn't have an index , therefore it's not always possible to use it. I have to create once a huge list without duplicates and then use it for ListView in the virtual mode. It was super-fast to make a HashSet<> first and then convert it into a List<> (so ListView can access items by index). List<>.Contains() is too slow. –  Sinatr Jul 31 '13 at 8:50

If you're using .Net 3+, you can use Linq.

List<T> withDupes = LoadSomeData();
List<T> noDupes = withDupes.Distinct().ToList();
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6  
That code will fail as .Distinct() returns an IEnumerable<T>. You have to add .ToList() to it. –  ljs Sep 6 '08 at 20:21
9  
Why do you init withDupes only to overwrite the empty List a line later? –  Motti Sep 7 '08 at 20:21
139  
because I'm dumb :) –  Factor Mystic Sep 11 '08 at 19:47
7  
No, it works with lists containing objects of any type. But you will have to override the default comparer for your type. Like so: public override bool Equals(object obj){...} –  BaBu Dec 9 '10 at 14:27
1  
It's always a good idea to override ToString() and GetHashCode() with your classes so that this kind of thing will work. –  B Seven Apr 8 '11 at 16:58

How about:-

var noDupes = list.Distinct().ToList();

In .net 3.5?

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Sort it, then check two and two next to each others, as the duplicates will clump together.

Something like this:

list.Sort();
Int32 index = 0;
while (index < list.Count - 1)
{
    if (list[index] == list[index + 1])
        list.RemoveAt(index);
    else
        index++;
}
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1  
If I am not mistaken, most of the approaches mentioned above are just abstractions of this very routines, right? I would have taken your approach here, Lasse, because its how I mentally picture moving through data. But, now I am interested in performance differences between some of the suggestions. –  Ian Patrick Hughes Aug 11 '09 at 20:52
7  
Implement them and time them, only way to be sure. Even Big-O notation won't help you with actual performance metrics, only a growth effect relationship. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Aug 12 '09 at 7:03
1  
I like this approach, it is more portable to other languages. –  Jerry Liang May 14 '12 at 0:26
6  
Don't do that. It's super slow. RemoveAt is a very costly operation on a List –  Clément Feb 9 '13 at 21:53
1  
Clément is right. A way to salvage this would be to wrap this in a method that yields with an enumerator and only return distinct values. Alternatively you could copy values to a new array or list. –  JHubbard80 Oct 25 '13 at 17:08

Simply initialize a HashSet with a List of the same type:

var noDupes = new HashSet<T>(withDupes);
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It worked for me. simply use

List<Type> liIDs = liIDs.Distinct().ToList<Type>();

Replace "Type" with your desired type e.g. int.

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1  
This is by far the most efficient (in programmer time) and clear, although [nitpicking alert] it is not necesary to specify the type when invoking ToList(). It will infere it. –  jesusiniesta Jan 20 at 17:23

As kronoz said in .Net 3.5 you can use Distinct().

In .Net 2 you could mimic it:

public IEnumerable<T> DedupCollection<T> ( IEnumerable<T> input ) {
    HashSet<T> passedValues = new HashSet<T>();

    //relatively simple dupe check alg used as example
    foreach( T item in input)
        if( passedValues.Contains(item) )
            continue;
        else {
            passedValues.Add(item)
            yield return item;
        }
}

This could be used to dedupe any collection and will return the values in the original order.

It's normally much quicker to filter a collection (as both Distinct() and this sample does) than it would be to remove items from it.

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The problem with this approach though is that it's O(N^2)-ish, as opposed to a hashset. But at least it's evident what it is doing. –  Tamas Czinege Jan 29 '09 at 18:25
1  
@DrJokepu - actually I didn't realise that the HashSet constructor deduped, which makes it better for most circumstances. However, this would preserve the sort order, which a HashSet doesn't. –  Keith Aug 24 '10 at 14:59
1  
HashSet<T> was introduced in 3.5 –  thorn Nov 5 '11 at 19:00
1  
@thorn really? So hard to keep track. In that case you could just use a Dictionary<T, object> instead, replace .Contains with .ContainsKey and .Add(item) with .Add(item, null) –  Keith Nov 6 '11 at 22:32

An extension method might be a decent way to go... something like this:

public static List<T> Deduplicate<T>(this List<T> listToDeduplicate)
{
    return listToDeduplicate.Distinct().ToList();
}

And then call like this, for example:

List<int> myFilteredList = unfilteredList.Deduplicate();
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In Java (I assume C# is more or less identical):

list = new ArrayList<T>(new HashSet<T>(list))

If you really wanted to mutate the original list:

List<T> noDupes = new ArrayList<T>(new HashSet<T>(list));
list.clear();
list.addAll(noDupes);

To preserve order, simply replace HashSet with LinkedHashSet.

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4  
in C# it would be: List<T> noDupes = new List<T>(new HashSet<T>(list)); list.Clear(); list.AddRange(noDupes); –  Sherif Maher Eaid Apr 16 '12 at 14:45
    
In C#, its easier this way: var noDupes = new HashSet<T>(list); list.Clear(); list.AddRange(noDupes); :) –  nawfal May 26 at 11:20
    
+1 for the only solution here that removes "in-place". If reallocation is not a problem, then list = list.Distinct().ToList(); will do :) –  nawfal May 26 at 11:23

I like to use this command:

List<Store> myStoreList = Service.GetStoreListbyProvince(provinceId)
                                                 .GroupBy(s => s.City)
                                                 .Select(grp => grp.FirstOrDefault())
                                                 .OrderBy(s => s.City)
                                                 .ToList();

I have these fields in my list: Id, StoreName, City, PostalCode I wanted to show list of cities in a dropdown which has duplicate values. solution: Group by city then pick the first one for the list.

I hope it helps :)

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Here's an extension method for removing adjacent duplicates in-situ. Call Sort() first and pass in the same IComparer. This should be more efficient than Lasse V. Karlsen's version which calls RemoveAt repeatedly (resulting in multiple block memory moves).

public static void RemoveAdjacentDuplicates<T>(this List<T> List, IComparer<T> Comparer)
{
    int NumUnique = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < List.Count; i++)
        if ((i == 0) || (Comparer.Compare(List[NumUnique - 1], List[i]) != 0))
            List[NumUnique++] = List[i];
    List.RemoveRange(NumUnique, List.Count - NumUnique);
}
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+1 for efficiency, but that capitalized I is definitely an eye sore –  reggaeguitar Mar 4 at 22:31
    
Fixed. The capital I was a hold-over from the style I had to use at a previous job. –  gary Mar 5 at 16:35

If you don't care about the order you can just shove the items into a HashSet, if you do want to maintain the order you can do something like this:

var unique = new List<T>();
var hs = new HashSet<T>();
foreach (T t in list)
    if (hs.Add(t))
        unique.Add(t);

Or the Linq way:

var hs = new HashSet<T>();
list.All( x =>  hs.Add(x) );

Edit: The HashSet method is O(N) time and O(N) space while sorting and then making unique (as suggested by @lassevk and others) is O(N*lgN) time and O(1) space so it's not so clear to me (as it was at first glance) that the sorting way is inferior (my apologies for the temporary down vote...)

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Another way in .Net 2.0

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<string> alpha = new List<string>();

        for(char a = 'a'; a <= 'd'; a++)
        {
            alpha.Add(a.ToString());
            alpha.Add(a.ToString());
        }

        Console.WriteLine("Data :");
        alpha.ForEach(delegate(string t) { Console.WriteLine(t); });

        alpha.ForEach(delegate (string v)
                          {
                              if (alpha.FindAll(delegate(string t) { return t == v; }).Count > 1)
                                  alpha.Remove(v);
                          });

        Console.WriteLine("Unique Result :");
        alpha.ForEach(delegate(string t) { Console.WriteLine(t);});
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
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There are many ways to solve - the duplicates issue in the List, below is one of them:

List<Container> containerList = LoadContainer();//Assume it has duplicates
List<Container> filteredList = new  List<Container>();
foreach (var container in containerList)
{ 
  Container duplicateContainer = containerList.Find(delegate(Container checkContainer)
  { return (checkContainer.UniqueId == container.UniqueId); });
   //Assume 'UniqueId' is the property of the Container class on which u r making a search

    if(!containerList.Contains(duplicateContainer) //Add object when not found in the new class object
      {
        filteredList.Add(container);
       }
  }

Cheers Ravi Ganesan

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Might be easier to simply make sure that duplicates are not added to the list.

if(items.IndexOf(new_item) < 0) 
    items.add(new_item)
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1  
I'm currently doing it like this but the more entries you have the longer the check for duplicates takes. –  Robert Jun 24 '13 at 14:59
    
I have the same problem here. I'm using the List<T>.Contains method each time but with more than 1,000,000 entries. This process slows down my application. I'm using a List<T>.Distinct().ToList<T>() first instead. –  Tareck117 Jan 3 at 19:05

Here's a simple solution that doesn't require any hard-to-read LINQ or any prior sorting of the list.

   private static void CheckForDuplicateItems(List<string> items)
    {
        if (items == null ||
            items.Count == 0)
            return;

        for (int outerIndex = 0; outerIndex < items.Count; outerIndex++)
        {
            for (int innerIndex = 0; innerIndex < items.Count; innerIndex++)
            {
                if (innerIndex == outerIndex) continue;
                if (items[outerIndex].Equals(items[innerIndex]))
                {
                    // Duplicate Found
                }
            }
        }
    }
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11  
that is easier to read than Linq? –  Cor_Blimey Oct 17 '12 at 20:41

David J.'s answer is a good method, no need for extra objects, sorting, etc. It can be improved on however:

for (int innerIndex = items.Count - 1; innerIndex > outerIndex ; innerIndex--)

So the outer loop goes top bottom for the entire list, but the inner loop goes bottom "until the outer loop position is reached".

The outer loop makes sure the entire list is processed, the inner loop finds the actual duplicates, those can only happen in the part that the outer loop hasn't processed yet.

Or if you don't want to do bottom up for the inner loop you could have the inner loop start at outerIndex + 1.

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  public static void RemoveDuplicates<T>(IList<T> list )
  {
     if (list == null)
     {
        return;
     }
     int i = 1;
     while(i<list.Count)
     {
        int j = 0;
        bool remove = false;
        while (j < i && !remove)
        {
           if (list[i].Equals(list[j]))
           {
              remove = true;
           }
           j++;
        }
        if (remove)
        {
           list.RemoveAt(i);
        }
        else
        {
           i++;
        }
     }  
  }
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