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Today I was playing with PHP, and I discovered that the string values "true" and "false" are not correctly parsed to boolean in a condition, for example considering the following function:

function isBoolean($value) {
   if ($value) {
      return true;
   } else {
      return false;
   }
}

If I execute:

isBoolean("true") // Returns true
isBoolean("") // Returns false
isBoolean("false") // Returns true, instead of false
isBoolean("asd") // Returns true, instead of false

It only seems to work with "1" and "0" values:

isBoolean("1") // Returns true
isBoolean("0") // Returns false

Is there a native function in PHP to parse "true" and "false" strings into boolean?

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In your code, isBoolean("") should return false. –  BoltClock Jan 23 '11 at 17:47
    
@BoltClock updated, thx –  Mark Jan 23 '11 at 17:50
    
You should consider changing the accepted answer to Eric Caron's answer. It shows you a native function that does what you ask. –  Code Commander Jul 29 '13 at 18:50

8 Answers 8

up vote 122 down vote accepted

There is a native PHP method of doing this which uses PHP's filter_var method:

$bool = filter_var($value, FILTER_VALIDATE_BOOLEAN);

According to PHP's manual:

Returns TRUE for "1", "true", "on" and "yes". Returns FALSE otherwise.

If FILTER_NULL_ON_FAILURE is set, FALSE is returned only for "0", "false", "off", "no", and "", and NULL is returned for all non-boolean values.

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This should have been the accepted answer. Built in PHP functions are better than building your own. No need to reinvent the wheel! Too bad it was too late :P –  casraf Jun 10 '13 at 7:28
    
does it also lowercase the value for the comparison? –  Mobiletainment Nov 9 '13 at 19:23
1  
@Mobiletainment, yes - it handles any casing you can imagine for $value (false, FALSE, FalSe, etc.) –  Eric Caron Nov 12 '13 at 21:11

The reason is that all strings evaluate to true when converting them to boolean, except "0" and "" (empty string).

The following function will do exactly what you want: it behaves exactly like PHP, but will also evaluates the string "false" as false:

function isBoolean($value) {
   if ($value && strtolower($value) !== "false") {
      return true;
   } else {
      return false;
   }
}

The documentation explains that: http://php.net/manual/en/language.types.boolean.php :

When converting to boolean, the following values are considered FALSE:

  • the boolean FALSE itself
  • the integer 0 (zero)
  • the float 0.0 (zero)
  • the empty string, and the string "0"
  • an array with zero elements
  • the special type NULL (including unset variables)
  • SimpleXML objects created from empty tags

Every other value is considered TRUE (including any resource).

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1  
+1 Nice. (Could chuck a strtolower in there, but that's about it.) –  middaparka Jan 23 '11 at 17:41
    
I think middaparka meant comparing strtolower($value) with 'false'. Passing a literal 'false' into strtolower is a little....daft? :) –  Paul Dixon Jan 23 '11 at 17:50
    
@Paul Dixon Yup, that's what I was referring to. :-) –  middaparka Jan 23 '11 at 17:52
2  
@Marco - if ($value && strtolower($value) !== "faux") { if you're working in French; if ($value && strtolower($value) !== "falsch") { in german; if ($value && strtolower($value) !== "onwaar") { in dutch... you can understand why PHP doesn't have this built in as standard –  Mark Baker Jan 23 '11 at 17:58
1  
"all non-empty strings evaluate to true when converting them to boolean, except "0"." –  BoltClock Jan 23 '11 at 18:08

In PHP only "0" or the empty string coerce to false; every other non-empty string coerces to true. From the manual:

When converting to boolean, the following values are considered FALSE:

  • the empty string, and the string "0"

You need to write your own function to handle the strings "true" vs "false". Here, I assume everything else defaults to false:

function isBoolean($value) {
   if ($value === "true") {
      return true;
   } else {
      return false;
   }
}

On a side note that could easily be condensed to

function isBoolean($value) {
   return $value === "true";
}
share|improve this answer

Is there a function in PHP to parse "true" and "false" strings into boolean?

No - both are strings, and those both (as you say) evaluate to true. Only empty strings evaluate to false in PHP.

You would need to test for this manually. If at all possible, though, it would be better to work with "real" boolean values instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Not all strings evaluate to true in PHP. –  coreyward Jan 23 '11 at 17:43
1  
Wasn't correcting, just clarifying. Saying "both are strings [and evaluate to true]" might give a newbie the wrong impression, especially one from another language with stricter typing rules where a string is a string and the contents don't matter when it's being converted to a boolean (like Ruby). –  coreyward Jan 23 '11 at 17:47
1  
@corey fair enough, good point. I will clarify in the text –  Pekka 웃 Jan 23 '11 at 17:48
    
"Only empty strings evaluate to false in PHP." But what about the non-empty string "0"? Doesn't this also evaluate to false? –  Sepster 2 days ago

I'm using this construct to morph strings into booleans, since you want true for most other values:

$str = "true";
$bool = !in_array($str, array("false", "", "0", "no", "off"));
share|improve this answer

I recently needed a "loose" boolean conversion function to handle strings like the ones you're asking about (among other things). I found a few different approaches and came up with a big set of test data to run through them. Nothing quite fit my needs so I wrote my own:

function loosely_cast_to_boolean($value) {
    if(is_array($value) || $value instanceof Countable) {
        return (boolean) count($value);
    } else if(is_string($value) || is_object($value) && method_exists($value, '__toString')) {
        $value = (string) $value;
        // see http://www.php.net/manual/en/filter.filters.validate.php#108218
        // see https://bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=49510
        $filtered = filter_var($value, FILTER_VALIDATE_BOOLEAN, FILTER_NULL_ON_FAILURE);
        if(!is_null($filtered)) {
            return $filtered;
        } else {
            // "none" gets special treatment to be consistent with ini file behavior.
            // see documentation in php.ini for more information, in part it says: 
            // "An empty string can be denoted by simply not writing anything after 
            // the equal sign, or by using the None keyword".
            if(strtolower($value) === 'none') {
                $value = '';
            }
            return (boolean) $value;
        }
    } else {
        return (boolean) $value;
    }
}

Note that for objects which are both countable and string-castable, this will favor the count over the string value to determine truthiness. That is, if $object instanceof Countable this will return (boolean) count($object) regardless of the value of (string) $object.

You can see the behavior for the test data I used as well as the results for several other functions here. It's kind of hard to skim the results from that little iframe, so you can view the script output in a full page, instead (that URL is undocumented so this might not work forever). In case those links die some day, I put the code up on pastebin as well.

The line between what "ought to be true" and what oughtn't is pretty arbitrary; the data I used is categorized based on my needs and aesthetic preferences, yours may differ.

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Any non-zero number in PHP is true. Any non-empty string, except for "0", is true. Read the documentation on the Boolean type. You would just need to test for it like any other string condition (probably with a stripos($value, 'false') so that any casing is accepted).

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Easiest Way to safely convert to a boolean;

    $flag = 'true';

    if( filter_var( $flag,FILTER_VALIDATE_BOOLEAN, FILTER_NULL_ON_FAILURE ) !== null) {
      $flag = filter_var($flag,FILTER_VALIDATE_BOOLEAN);
    }

    gettype($flag); // Would Return 'Boolean'
    echo 'Val: '.$flag; // Would Output 'Val: 1'
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