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Is there a way in Java's for-each loop

for(String s : stringArray) {
  doSomethingWith(s);
}

to find out how often the loop has already been processed?

Aside from using using the old and well-known for(int i=0;i<boundary;i++)-loop, is the construct

int i = 0;
for(String s : stringArray) {
  doSomethingWith(s);
  i++;
}

the only way to have such a counter available in a for-each loop?

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1  
the question not clear. can write more description. –  ecleel Jan 25 '09 at 11:20
1  
possible duplicate of How do you get the index of the current iteration of a foreach loop? –  Junuxx Oct 22 '12 at 11:04
1  
@Junuxx no, this is Java, not C# –  eagleoneraptor Apr 9 '13 at 16:05
1  
Another pity is that you cannot use the loop variable outside the loop, Type var = null; for (var : set) dosomething; if (var != null) then ... –  Val Sep 5 '13 at 12:45

9 Answers 9

up vote 89 down vote accepted

Yes, you'll have to provide your own counter.

The reason for this is that the for-each loop internally does not have a counter; it is based on the Iterable interface, i.e. it uses an Iterator to loop through the "collection" - which may not be a collection at all, and may in fact be something not at all based on indexes (such as a linked list).

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1  
Ruby has a construct for this and Java should get it too... for(int idx=0, String s; s : stringArray; ++idx) doSomethingWith(s, idx); –  Nicholas DiPiazza Mar 6 at 22:37
    
also python: for idx, s in enumerate(collection): .... –  monojohnny Aug 27 at 20:38

There is another way.

Given that you write your own Index class and a static method that returns an Iterable over instances of this class you can

for (Index<String> each: With.index(stringArray)) {
    each.value;
    each.index;
    ...
}

Where the implementation of With.index is something like

class With {
    public static <T> Iterable<Index<T>> index(final T[] array) {
        return new Iterable<Index<T>>() {
            public Iterator<Index<T>> iterator() {
                return new Iterator<Index<T>>() {
                    index = 0;
                    public boolean hasNext() { return index < array.size }
                    public Index<T> next() { return new Index(array[index], index++); }
                    ...
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
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3  
Neat idea. I would have upvoted had it not been for short lived object creation of the Index class. –  mR_fr0g Jun 11 '13 at 14:44
    
@mR_fr0g don't worry, I benchmarked this and creating all these objects is not any slower than reusing the same object for each iteration. The reason is that all these objects are allocated in eden space only and never life long enough to reach the heap. So allocating them is as fast as e.g. allocating local variables. –  akuhn Jun 12 '13 at 21:55
    
@akuhn Wait. Eden space does not mean that no GC is reaquired. Quite the opposite, you need to invoke constructor, scan sooner with GC and finalize. This not only loads CPU but also invalidates the cache all the time. Nothing like this is necessary for local variables. Why do you say that this is "the same"? –  Val Sep 1 '13 at 14:03
    
@Val objects without constructor are allocated by incrementing a pointer. That's all. One instruction. And since none of these objects escapes eden, GC just resets that pointer. At least it used to do that 4 years ago. If you are curious, you can look at the assembly code using the PrintOptoAssembly option. –  akuhn Sep 2 '13 at 10:37
2  
I was going to say I don't really understand the need to debate when the Index instance can be created once and reused/updated, just to moot the argument and make everyone happy. However, in my measurements, the version that creates a new Index() each time performed more than twice as fast on my machine, about equal to a native iterator running the same iterations. –  Eric Woodruff Dec 21 '13 at 21:03

You need to run your own counter thus:

int i = 0;
for(String s : stringArray) {
    doSomethingWith(s,i);
    i++;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This still seems to be the clearest solution, even with List and Iterable interfaces. –  Josh Pinter Dec 17 '13 at 17:14

I'm afraid this isn't possible with foreach. But I can suggest you a simple old-styled for-loops:

	List<String> l = new ArrayList<String>();

	l.add("a");
	l.add("b");
	l.add("c");
	l.add("d");

	// the array
	String[] array = new String[l.size()];

	for(ListIterator<String> it =l.listIterator(); it.hasNext() ;)
	{
		array[it.nextIndex()] = it.next();
	}

Notice that, the List interface gives you access to it.nextIndex().

(edit)

To your changed example:

	for(ListIterator<String> it =l.listIterator(); it.hasNext() ;)
	{
		int i = it.nextIndex();
		doSomethingWith(it.next(), i);
	}
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One of the changes Sun is considering for Java7 is to provide access to the inner Iterator in foreach loops. the syntax will be something like this (if this is accepted):

for (String str : list : it) {
  if (str.length() > 100) {
    it.remove();
  }
}

This is syntactic sugar, but apparently a lot of requests were made for this feature. But until it is approved, you'll have to count the iterations yourself, or use a regular for loop with an Iterator.

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Using lambdas and functional interfaces in Java 8 makes creating new loop abstractions possible. I can loop over a collection with the index and the collection size:

List<String> strings = Arrays.asList("one", "two","three","four");
forEach(strings, (x, i, n) -> System.out.println("" + (i+1) + "/"+n+": " + x));

Which outputs:

1/4: one
2/4: two
3/4: three
4/4: four

Which I implemented as:

   @FunctionalInterface
   public interface LoopWithIndexAndSizeConsumer<T> {
       void accept(T t, int i, int n);
   }
   public static <T> void forEach(Collection<T> collection,
                                  LoopWithIndexAndSizeConsumer<T> consumer) {
      int index = 0;
      for (T object : collection){
         consumer.accept(object, index++, collection.size());
      }
   }

The possibilities are endless. For example, I create an abstraction that uses a special function just for the first element:

forEachHeadTail(strings, 
                (head) -> System.out.print(head), 
                (tail) -> System.out.print(","+tail));

Which prints a comma separated list correctly:

one,two,three,four

Which I implemented as:

public static <T> void forEachHeadTail(Collection<T> collection, 
                                       Consumer<T> headFunc, 
                                       Consumer<T> tailFunc) {
   int index = 0;
   for (T object : collection){
      if (index++ == 0){
         headFunc.accept(object);
      }
      else{
         tailFunc.accept(object);
      }
   }
}

Libraries will begin to pop up to do these sorts of things, or you can roll your own.

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If you need a counter in an for-each loop you have to count yourself. There is no built in counter as far as I know.

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(I've fixed that bug in the question.) –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jan 25 '09 at 11:39
    
Check again. There is the same bug in the second code snippet... –  EricSchaefer Jan 25 '09 at 11:47

There is a "variant" to pax' answer... ;-)

int i = -1;
for(String s : stringArray) {
    doSomethingWith(s, ++i);
}
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1  
Curious, is there any benefit of using this over the, seemingly, clearer i=0; i++; approach? –  Josh Pinter Dec 17 '13 at 17:17
    
I guess if you need to use again the i index after doSomething in the for scope. –  Edo Jul 4 at 13:52

I'm a little surprised no-one suggested the following (I admit it's a lazy approach...); If stringArray is a List of some sort, you could use something like stringArray.indexOf(S) to return a value for the current count.

Note: this assumes that the elements of the List are unique, or that it doesn't matter if they are non-unique (because in that case it will return the index of the first copy found).

There are situations in which that would be sufficient...

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2  
With a performance approaching O(n²) for the whole loop it's very hard to imagine even a few situations where this would be superior to anything else. Sorry. –  Kosi2801 Mar 5 '11 at 21:57

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