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Please consider the following text :

That is, it matches at any position that has a non-word character to the left of it, and a word character to the right of it.

How can I get the following result :

That is, it matches at any position that has a non-word character to the 

That is everything until left

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How do these weak questions go unfilterred? The least that should be done is a specific real example, at least someone who doesen't know what a 'word' is will not get confused. – sln Jan 23 '11 at 22:06
1  
@sin How do these weak comments go unfiltered? The least that should be done is explain the confusion. – marcog Jan 23 '11 at 22:37
1  
The problem with this question is using an example text which could itself be a part of the question text. As if there were no other sentences in the world. – maaartinus Jan 23 '11 at 23:51
    
I think it was supposed to be a lead in to what a word boundry is. – sln Jan 24 '11 at 0:34
up vote 10 down vote accepted
input.replace("^(.*?)\\bleft.*$", "$1");
  • ^ anchors to the beginning of the string
  • .*? matches as little as possible of any character
  • \b matches a word boundary
  • left matches the string literal "left"
  • .* matches the remainder of the string
  • $ anchors to the end of the string
  • $1 replaces the matched string with group 1 in ()

If you want to use any word (not just "left"), be careful to escape it. You can use Pattern.quote(word) to escape the string.

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excellent it worked – London Jan 23 '11 at 19:38
    
@London, it shouldn't have worked. Replace left with '-left' in the string and regex. Or is 'left' not variable text? So what worked about it? – sln Jan 23 '11 at 22:03
    
@sin Please read the full answer before criticising it. I explain how to use a variable word at the end. – marcog Jan 23 '11 at 22:36
    
@sin If that is the case then you have to use a different boundary-matching (e.g. ?<=\s) or forego it entirely. I put more weight on not matching fooleft than a non-word such as -left. – marcog Jan 24 '11 at 0:40
    
Yea, english is a funny thing, some would say a word is a character class, others would say its not -left as opposed to _left. Me, I don't put any weight on \b at all, never did. – sln Jan 24 '11 at 0:56

The answer is actually /(.*)\Wleft\w/ but it won't match anything in

That is, it matches at any position that has a non-word character to the left of it, and a word character to the right of it.
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String result = inputString.replace("(.*?)left.*", "$1");
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sorry not working – London Jan 23 '11 at 19:30
    
I'm sorry, the only flaw that might happen in this is if there are newlines that you didn't mention – kelloti Jan 23 '11 at 19:35

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