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I would like to use sqlite (using Java JDBC, not sure if that matters) to add or replace a new row to a database, and return the autogenerated ID of the row, and I'm not sure how to do this efficiently/cleanly.

table definition has >= 3 columns:

  • autogenerated integer ID
  • unique key string (let's call it key)
  • other metadata

I can think of two general approaches:

  1. SELECT ID FROM myTable WHERE key = ?
  2. If there's no match, INSERT a new row, and repeat step #1 to get the autogenerated ID

or

  1. INSERT OR REPLACE INTO myTable (key, metadata) VALUES (?, ?)
  2. SELECT ID FROM myTable WHERE key = ?

What should I do? Not sure if either approach is an atomic transaction. (well, the first isn't, not sure about the 2nd)


edit: I just tried the INSERT OR REPLACE approach, and it "works", except that it also replaces the ID with a new one, which is not what I want to have happen. I want to keep the existing ID.

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OMG - Java is a perfectly valid tag. There may be Java framework specific solutions (e.g. hibernate). –  RichardTheKiwi Jan 23 '11 at 21:15
    
@cyberkiwi: The question doesn't remotely relate to java -- entirely SQL. Doesn't change the fact you rollback my edits to make the question more readable. You have the power to edit questions -- start using it responsibly and grow up. –  OMG Ponies Jan 23 '11 at 21:20
    
@OMG - the question states, I quote using Java JDBC..replace a new row to a database, and return the autogenerated ID of the row. There are Java framework solutions for this. Where do you get the "not related to Java" bit from. It was readable as-is unless you cannot discern the gaps and the "or" in between –  RichardTheKiwi Jan 23 '11 at 21:24
    
look, I appreciate the help @OMG Ponies, but I agree w/ @cyberkiwi and you don't have to add extra formatting. It's fairly clear as it is, IMHO –  Jason S Jan 23 '11 at 21:26
    
@cyber: That's why you need to erase all my edits? You're only here because I was. –  OMG Ponies Jan 23 '11 at 21:26
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using a PreparedStatement you can return the generated key for an insert so there is no need to run a select statement after a insert just to get the key.

To do this:

  • When you prepare the statement, use the method that allows you specify it to return the generated keys.
  • After you run the update call "getGeneratedKeys()" on the statement object.
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could you give an example? I looked at PreparedStatement and it says executeUpdate() returns an int which is the row count, not a generated key. Also I'm not sure what to do if it's an update and not an insert (I have to handle both cases). –  Jason S Jan 23 '11 at 21:19
    
When you prepare the statement, use the method that allows you specify it to return the generated keys. After you run the update call "getGeneratedKeys()" on the statement object. –  jzd Jan 23 '11 at 21:28
    
ah! I didn't see that method. Thanks, I'll try it. –  Jason S Jan 23 '11 at 21:32
    
hey, that works great (suggest you put getGeneratedKeys() into your answer) -- except an INSERT OR REPLACE replaces the old autogenerated ID with a new one :-( –  Jason S Jan 23 '11 at 21:35
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There is a SQLITE function for getting the last inserted auto id

SELECT last_insert_rowid()

Not sure if it works for updates though

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