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I've been very confused about this recently and can't find an answer anywhere.

When programming for android, I want to update a textview every 10 seconds, but how would I go about that? I've seen some samples use "Run()" and "Update()", but that doesn't seem to help when I try it, any ideas?

Right now I have:

public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState){ super.onCreate(savedInstanceState); setContentView(R.layout.slideshow); CONST_TIME = (int) System.currentTimeMillis(); Resources res = getResources(); myString = res.getStringArray(R.array.myArray); } public void checkTime(View V){ TextView text = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.fadequote); CUR_TIME = (int) System.currentTimeMillis(); text.setText(""+(int) (CUR_TIME-CONST_TIME));//Debugs how much time has gone by if(CUR_TIME-CONST_TIME>10000){ getNextQuote(null); //A function that gets a random quote CONST_TIME = CUR_TIME; } }

I guess what I'm REALLY asking is how do I make checkTime() repeat it-self endlessly until onPause() is called?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What about using a timer?

private Timer timer = new Timer();
private TimerTask timerTask;
timerTask = new TimerTask() {
 @Override
 public void run() {
    //refresh your textview
 }
};
timer.schedule(timerTask, 0, 10000);

Cancel it via timer.cancel(). In your run() method you could use runOnUiThread();

UPDATE:

I have a livescoring app, which uses this Timer to update it every 30 sec. It looks like this:

private Timer timer;
private TimerTask timerTask;

public void onPause(){
    super.onPause();
    timer.cancel();
}

public void onResume(){
    super.onResume();
    try {
       timer = new Timer();
       timerTask = new TimerTask() {
          @Override
          public void run() {
         //Download file here and refresh
          }
       };
    timer.schedule(timerTask, 30000, 30000);
    } catch (IllegalStateException e){
       android.util.Log.i("Damn", "resume error");
    }
}
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Where do I put "Timertask = new TimerTask(){...}; timer.schedule(tiemrTask,0,10000);" ? Just under my class or do I need to put it under onResume();? Because I get errors if I put it in my class. –  QQWW1 Jan 23 '11 at 22:23
    
I updated my post. What errors do you get? (LogCat output) –  Rainer Jan 23 '11 at 22:32
    
So, I did that exactly (except instead of "//Download file here and refresh" i did "getNextQuote(null)" which will randomly find a quote from an array and refresh the textview with the new quote, but it will only do that once, not continuously. I set Timertask to 10 if that makes any sort of diffrence. Also no errors in LogCat –  QQWW1 Jan 23 '11 at 23:04
    
Actually, I am mistaken, I put "android.util.Log.i("Success","getNextQuote returned");" after getNextQuote(null); and it comes up every 10 seconds!.. so mostly likely a mistake in the function itself.. thanks! –  QQWW1 Jan 23 '11 at 23:10
    
You're welcome. I'm glad I could help you. To update the TextView you might then use something like runOnUiThread if you're expecting an error like: "Only the original thread that created a view hierarchy can touch its views". Good luck! –  Rainer Jan 23 '11 at 23:17

Rather than fuss with a background thread and then runOnUiThread(), use postDelayed(), available on any View, to schedule a Runnable. That Runnable can update your TextView and then schedule itself for the next pass. Using a background thread for the purposes of watching time tick by is a waste.

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How do you use this mechanism when updating a listview item? given that a view might be reused, in which case the previously scheduled runnable needs to be removed. how do you remove a posted runnable? –  500865 Jun 18 '13 at 3:20
    
@500865: "how do you remove a posted runnable" -- call removeCallbacks(). –  CommonsWare Jun 18 '13 at 10:33
    
Thanks @CommonsWare. I never noticed that method in the View class. That should work. –  500865 Jun 18 '13 at 14:51

incase it helps someone here is an example code using postDelayed()

...

private Handler mHandler = new Handler();

...

// call updateTask after 10seconds
mHandler.postDelayed(updateTask, 10000);

...

private Runnable updateTask = new Runnable () {
    public void run() {
        Log.d(getString(R.string.app_name) + " ChatList.updateTask()",
                "updateTask run!");

                    // run any code here...         

                    // queue the task to run again in 15 seconds...
                    mHandler.postDelayed(updateTask, 15000);


    }
};
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Use a thread. See Painless Threading.

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Clicking the link results in a 404: Not found –  utrecht Oct 5 at 21:13

I agree with Wired00's answer but please follow this order:

//update current time view after every 1 seconds
        Handler handler=new Handler();

        final Runnable updateTask=new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                updateCurrentTime();
                handler.postDelayed(this,1000);
            }
        };

        handler.postDelayed(updateTask,1000);
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