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When doing this:

def user_log
    if logged_in? == false
        form_tag session_path, :id => "mform" do
            content_tag(:span, content_tag(text_field_tag :email, "email@domain.com"), :class => "memail")+
            content_tag(:span, content_tag(password_field_tag :password, "12345678912"), :class => "mpass")+
            content_tag(:span, content_tag(submit_tag 'Login'), :class => "mbutton")
        end
    else
        ...     
        end
    end
end

I get this:

stack overflow doesn't let me post pictures

Since I don't want the extra "<" and ">", what am I doing wrong?

EDIT: As extra information, on my view I am just doing:

<%= user_log %>
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Also, why do you need a span class around your input tags? Why not just put the class definition on the input tag itself? –  vrish88 Jan 23 '11 at 23:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The fundamental problem is that you are using content_tag twice when you don't need to. content_tag essentially calls content_tag_string. Here's content_tag_string's source:

def content_tag_string(name, content, options, escape = true)
  tag_options = tag_options(options, escape) if options
  "<#{name}#{tag_options}>#{content}</#{name}>".html_safe
end

Calling content_tag(text_field_tag :email, "email@domain.com") looks like:

"<#{text_field_tag :email, "email@domain.com"}>"

and text_field_tag already produces a full HTML tag (it includes the "<" and ">").

All you need to do to get rid of the extra angled brackets is to leave out the second content_tag:

content_tag(:span, text_field_tag(:email, "email@domain.com"), :class => "memail")+
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Awesome, thank you very much, solved it AND I understood what was happening –  VascoP Jan 23 '11 at 23:55

As a first guess, I might try something like:

if logged_in? == false
  ...
else
  ...
end.html_safe

Update: Ok, back to the drawing board.

As a second guess, try this. (And note the extra parameter to content_tag, which required putting the hash in explicit { }...)

def user_log
    if logged_in? == false
        form_tag session_path, :id => "mform" do
          (
            content_tag(:span, content_tag(text_field_tag :email, "email@domain.com"),   {:class => "memail"},   false)+
            content_tag(:span, content_tag(password_field_tag :password, "12345678912"), {:class => "mpass"},    false)+
            content_tag(:span, content_tag(submit_tag 'Login'),                          {:class => "mbutton"},  false)
          ).html_safe
        end
    else
        ...     
        end
    end
end
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Gah tried the updated version, and to no avail. Keep getting the same result. Instead of making this approach work, is there anything else I could try? –  VascoP Jan 23 '11 at 23:30
    
Well, be sure you tried the latest version. It says I edited it x minutes ago, but it's actually less because it doesn't count closely following edits. Anyway, I've had similar problems with content_tag, you might just try generating the <span> blocks by hand. –  DigitalRoss Jan 23 '11 at 23:46

Though I haven't tried it locally, the problem is likely that Rails is html escaping your handy helper method. To see if I'm right, try throwing this in your view:

<%= raw(user_log) %>

If that works, you can throw raw in your helper method instead:

def user_log
    if logged_in? == false
        raw(form_tag session_path, :id => "mform" do
            content_tag(:span, content_tag(text_field_tag :email, "email@domain.com"), :class => "memail")+
            content_tag(:span, content_tag(password_field_tag :password, "12345678912"), :class => "mpass")+
            content_tag(:span, content_tag(submit_tag 'Login'), :class => "mbutton")
        end)
    else
        ...     
    end
end

raw tells Rails that this code is safe and doesn't need to be html escaped.

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The first raw(use_log) option, does nothing different from what I have now. The second throws a bunch of exceptions... –  VascoP Jan 23 '11 at 22:02

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