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Well I am trying to submit a form by pressing enter but not displaying a submit button. I don't want to get into JavaScript if possible since I want everything to work on all browsers (the only JS way I know is with events).

Right now the form looks like this:

<form name="loginBox" target="#here" method="post">
    <input name="username" type="text" /><br />
    <input name="password" type="password" />
    <input type="submit" style="height: 0px; width: 0px; border: none; padding: 0px;" hidefocus="true" />
</form>

Which works pretty well. The submit button works when the user presses enter, and the button doesn't show in Firefox, IE, Safari, Opera and Chrome. However, I still don't like the solution since it is hard to know whether it will work on all platforms with all browsers.

Can anyone suggest a better method? Or is this about as good as it gets?

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3  
Small point that might shave a few characters off your CSS and will typically be done automatically be minifiers- you do not need units for zero length measurements. 0px = 0pt = 0em = 0em etc. –  pwdst May 12 '13 at 16:30

15 Answers 15

up vote 125 down vote accepted

Try:

<input type="submit" style="position: absolute; left: -9999px"/>

That will push the button waaay to the left, out of the screen. The nice thing with this is, you'd get graceful degradation when CSS is disabled.

Update - Workaround for IE7

As suggested by Bryan Downing:

<input type="submit" style="position: absolute; left: -9999px; width: 1px; height: 1px;"/>
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5  
Just tried this solution in IE7 with the same result as Erebus. The following code fixes it: position: absolute; width: 1px; height: 1px; left: -9999px; –  Bryan Downing Nov 3 '10 at 1:01
15  
What a horrible hack :( why is HTML like this in the first place? Is there a good reason for enter not to work in this case? –  nornagon Apr 10 '11 at 7:40
9  
@nornagon: If you feel that this hack is horrible, feel free to suggest a less horrible one. HTML is what it is... –  Ates Goral Apr 10 '11 at 21:07
8  
@MooseFactory tabindex="-1" –  Ates Goral Jul 13 '12 at 16:04
6  
"the nice thing is ... graceful degradation when CSS is disabled"?! I mean sure, this works great, but the "graceful degradation" part is just marketing tactics. I hadn't even heard of it until I found this page from the year 2002. That's right, the only Google result on the first page for "css is disabled in the browser" is from 10 years ago (or 7 considering this answer was put up in 2009). –  Vicky Chijwani Jan 20 '13 at 18:31

You could try also this

<INPUT TYPE="image" SRC="0piximage.gif" HEIGHT="0" WIDTH="0" BORDER="0">

You could include an image with width/height = 0 px

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1  
IMPORTANT: you MUST use a valid image URL or Firefox will show a "Submit Query" text on your page –  PH. Dec 12 '12 at 16:45
1  
If you add an image that exists and set height and width to zero, or add a non-existent image then the browser will have to make a wasted GET request for the resource. –  pwdst May 12 '13 at 16:35

IE doesn't allow pressing the ENTER key for form submission if the submit button is not visible, and the form has more than one field. Give it what it wants by providing a 1x1 pixel transparent image as a submit button. Of course it will take up a pixel of the layout, but look what you have to do to hide it.

<input type="image" src="img/1x1trans.gif"/>
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Following the solution of @strager but a little bit simplier, without the submit button:

HTML

<form action="path_to_the_action">
  <input class="submit_on_enter" type="text" name="q" placeholder="Search...">
</form>

jQuery

<script type="text/javascript">
  $(document).ready(function() {
    $('.submit_on_enter').keydown(function(event) {
        if (event.keyCode == 13) {
            this.form.submit();
            return false;
         }
    });
  });
</script>
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the simplest way

<input type="submit" style="width:0px; height:0px; opacity:0;"/>
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I think you should go the Javascript route, or at least I would:

<script type="text/javascript">
// Using jQuery.

$(function() {
    $('form').each(function() {
        $(this).find('input').keypress(function(e) {
            // Enter pressed?
            if(e.which == 10 || e.which == 13) {
                this.form.submit();
            }
        });

        $(this).find('input[type=submit]').hide();
    });
});
</script>


<form name="loginBox" target="#here" method="post">
    <input name="username" type="text" /><br />
    <input name="password" type="password" />
    <input type="submit" />
</form>
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4  
nice one, tested and working fine. But before trying something like this, remember that submitting form via Javascript won't cause some browsers to offer the password saving stuff. –  andyk Jan 26 '09 at 11:35
1  
This will cause the submit button to appear for a moment (until the page loads and the JS runs). –  nornagon Apr 10 '11 at 7:34
9  
A keypress is also triggered for a selection from autocomplete, i.e. if the user is inputting an email address and he/she selects a previously given one from the browser's autocomplete by hitting enter, then your form will submit. Not what your users will expect. –  cburgmer Mar 11 '12 at 10:08
    
This is not JavaScript. This is jQuery lib on JS. Why mislead? –  Viz Dec 8 at 8:22

Just set the hidden attribute to true:

<form name="loginBox" target="#here" method="post">
    <input name="username" type="text" /><br />
    <input name="password" type="password" />
    <input type="submit" hidden="true" />
</form>
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1  
Attribute hidden will disable submit by pressing enter. –  66Ton99 Sep 23 '13 at 8:11

I added it to a function on document ready. If there is no submit button on the form (all of my Jquery Dialog Forms don't have submit buttons), append it.

$(document).ready(function (){
    addHiddenSubmitButtonsSoICanHitEnter();
});
function addHiddenSubmitButtonsSoICanHitEnter(){
    var hiddenSubmit = "<input type='submit' style='position: absolute; left: -9999px; width: 1px; height: 1px;' tabindex='-1'/>";
    $("form").each(function(i,el){
        if($(this).find(":submit").length==0)
            $(this).append(hiddenSubmit);
    });
}
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try this js function: fast submitter:

all You have to do is only add enterable_form class to the <form> tag and You're set ;)

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Use following code, this fixed my problem in all 3 browsers (FF, IE and Chrome):

<input  type="submit" name="update" value=" Apply " 
    style="position: absolute; height: 0px; width: 0px; border: none; padding: 0px;"
    hidefocus="true" tabindex="-1"/>

Add above line as a first line in your code with appropriate value of name and value.

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@MPi it was just not formatted as code. –  stema Nov 14 '11 at 10:21
    
This is brilliant. it works perfectly. –  Erik Funkenbusch Jan 30 '12 at 23:20

This is my solution, tested in Chrome, Firefox 6 and IE7+:

.hidden{
    height: 1px;
    width: 1px;
    position: absolute;
    z-index: -100;
}
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Seems like IE8 doesn't like position:absolute, it doesn't submit. –  maxxyme Jul 9 at 17:18

For those who have problems with IE and for others too.

{
    float: left;
    width: 1px;
    height: 1px;
    background-color: transparent;
    border: none;
}
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I'd still use position:absolute, float affects the layout. –  SuperDuck Apr 30 at 6:50
    
Seems like IE8 doesn't like position:absolute, it doesn't submit. I use: –  maxxyme Jul 9 at 17:15
    
Same for float: left;, when removed, it submits. –  maxxyme Jul 9 at 17:38

I can't think of any reason to hide the submit button. It doesn't look like a good idea from a usability point of view.

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1  
It is a quick login box and having the button clutters that. –  PythonPower Jan 25 '09 at 21:05
1  
@PythonPower, It's still good to have a button regardless. You can style it to make it compact, or even use an image. "Go" is often used/acceptable if the login box is already labeled. –  strager Jan 25 '09 at 22:16
    
agree with strager. There's still a handful of people that must reach for their mouse after entering anything into a web form. But it's always good to know ways of doing something. –  andyk Jan 26 '09 at 11:21
2  
since I am web savvy i try to avoid pressing enter in forms (subconsciously mostly) becasue i know of the surrounding issues and dont always expect it to work reliably. just a little arrow pointing to the right in a circle is what i'd do –  Simon_Weaver Nov 7 '09 at 5:38

Have you tried this ?

<input type="submit" style="visibility: hidden;" />

Since most browsers understand visibility:hidden and it doesn't really work like display:none, I'm guessing that it should be fine, though. Haven't really tested it myself, so CMIIW.

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thanks strager for the edit. –  andyk Jan 26 '09 at 11:13
1  
Yes - this works on chrome, unlike using display:none;. –  Gary van der Merwe Mar 25 '11 at 9:30
2  
there's just one thing about visibility: hidden: as you can read in w3schools, visibity:none still affects the layout. If you want to avoid this whitespace, the solution with absolute positioning seems to be better for me. –  loybert Sep 28 '12 at 15:32
1  
You can combine both solutions: <input type="submit" style="visibility: hidden; position: absolute;" /> –  VaclavSir Dec 11 '13 at 14:27
2  
Damn it, this doesn't work in IE8 (it doesn't submit the form), so the solution from above wins: position: absolute; left: -100px; width: 1px; height: 1px; –  VaclavSir Dec 11 '13 at 15:27

Instead of the hack you currently use to hide the button, it would be much simpler to set visibility: collapse; in the style attribute. However, I would still recommend using a bit of simple Javascript to submit the form. As far as I understand, support for such things is ubiquitous nowadays.

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1  
Doesn't hide it on IE6. –  Ates Goral Jan 25 '09 at 13:47
    
Ah yes, it's always IE6 forcing us to do nasty hacks... –  Noldorin Jan 26 '09 at 11:43

protected by Jorgesys Jan 3 at 22:51

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