Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a MYSQL database that contains data on my companies customers as they use our services each day.

each table in the database represents one 24 hour period and all customer transactions that took place in that period.

I would like to count the total transactions over a number of days

so far I have a select statement that does the following

select 
  (
    select count(customer) from 2010Dec28 
    where customer='<customer name>'
  ) as t1,
  (
    select count(customer) from 2010Dec29 
    where customer='<customer name>'
  )as t2;`

but this returns the result as two separate counts

| t1   | t2    |
| 1438 | 16282 |
1 row n set (0.00 sec)`

My question is how can I generate the sum of these two results without having to do so in my application code.

share|improve this question
4  
I think "each table in the database represents one 24 hour period" is the point where you should stop and reconsider your design. – Oliver Charlesworth Jan 23 '11 at 22:46
1  
Follow the advice people are giving you and fix your design. You should not have a separate table for each date. At most you might have one table for live data and one table for archived data. The date is a column in various rows in a table, not the name of a table. Then querying for counts by date is straightforward as can be. If you need an interim solution until you can fix your design, use a UNION ALL query to combine multiple queries into one, then wrap the whole union into another SELECT to SUM all the counts. – Dan Grossman Jan 23 '11 at 22:49
    
each table for each day is a worst idea ever i seen, inefficient, unmaintainable – Svisstack Jan 23 '11 at 22:50
1  
wow ok definitely going to be redesigning the way I do this, In my defence I'm a network engineer by trade and have been knocking this together in my spare time to get some stats from various log files – user428300 Jan 23 '11 at 22:59
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Tyler is probably right, design is surely wrong!

But it is possible..

select 
    sum(a.count)
from
    (select count(*) as count from table1
     union all
     select count(*) as count from table2) a
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion but this gives me an error like ERROR 1248 (42000): Every derived table must have its own alias – user428300 Jan 23 '11 at 23:04
    
ok, that varies by rdbms and im not that familar with mysql, i've edited to add an alias. – Paul Creasey Jan 23 '11 at 23:13
    
Ok this works for mysql, thanks for the help, this will be used in the short term whilst I design the db again. – user428300 Jan 23 '11 at 23:18

Fix your database design. Unless you're doing some sort of mass data warehousing on billions of rows, a seperate table per day is very improper.

share|improve this answer

Just swap the cross join for a direct sub + sub, per below. Much easier than making any unions or joins

select 
  (
    select count(customer) from 2010Dec28 
    where customer='<customer name>'
  ) + (
    select count(customer) from 2010Dec29 
    where customer='<customer name>'
  )
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.