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I'm doing a experiment, which, I think, is a guaranteed deadlock situation:

void *thread_1(void *vptr)
{
    pthread_mutex_lock(&a);
    sleep(1);
    pthread_mutex_lock(&b);
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&b);
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&a);
}

void *thread_2(void *vptr)
{
    pthread_mutex_lock(&b);
    sleep(1);
    pthread_mutex_lock(&a);
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&a);
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&b);
}

What happens if a thread cannot lock? Does it get into a queue, waiting for the mutex, or does it simply move on to the next instruction?

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3 Answers 3

It depends on the reason why it couldn't lock. E.g if the thread already holds the lock, an error might be returned. You should check the return value, anyhow, and check the manual page for the error codes that are return in errno. Mine (linux) states:

   The pthread_mutex_lock() function may fail if:

   EDEADLK
          The current thread already owns the mutex.
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In correct code not operating on a process-shared mutex, pthread_mutex_lock can never return an error. The only errors it's allowed to return indicate programming errors, not exceptional conditions at runtime. –  R.. Jan 24 '11 at 2:50
    
I should have said robust along with process-shared. Anyway the point of my comment was checking the return value of pthread_mutex_lock is not necessary (or useful) except when debugging or using process-shared robust mutexes (in which case you need to check for EOWNERDEAD). –  R.. Jan 24 '11 at 3:00
    
@R.: see my edit. –  Jens Gustedt Jan 24 '11 at 7:48
    
May, not shall. Unless you have created an error-checking or recurive mutex, the behavior on attempting to lock a mutex you already hold a lock on is undefined, and therefore it's a programming error to do so. –  R.. Jan 24 '11 at 16:11

If a thread tries to lock a mutex that is already locked by another thread, it will be suspended. In this case, its execution will not continue until it has acquired the lock. (There is no "queue" though - just an unordered set of waiting threads. Any waiting thread could be the next to acquire the mutex).

If a thread tries to lock a mutex that is already locked by itself or not initialised properly, then pthread_mutex_lock() may return a non-zero error code, and execution will continue without the mutex being acquired.

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Doing so is undefined behavior, so it could just as well result in system("rm -rf /"); –  R.. Jan 24 '11 at 2:56
    
@R.: It is my understanding that PTHREAD_MUTEX_ERRORCHECK and PTHREAD_MUTEX_RECURSIVE are both in POSIX? –  caf Jan 24 '11 at 3:45
    
Recursive mutexes cannot return failure except for programming errors ([near-]infinite recursion). Error checking mutexes are essentially just a debugging tool. I would not call code that uses error checking mutexes and looks for an error to see if it already holds the lock to be good code, but I suppose it's at least valid. –  R.. Jan 24 '11 at 4:06

In your case both threads will be suspended forever waiting for the mutexes. If you start both threads at once.

Why don't you just create the mutexes and the threads and then run your example?

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it's (just) an experiment. –  andandandand Jan 23 '11 at 23:19

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