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Assume I have a class like this:

function Widget() {
    this.id = new Date().getTime();
    // other fields
}
Widget.prototype = {
    load: function(args) {
        // do something
    }
}

From this class I created some other classes which inherit the same prototype but have some added methods. What I want to do is being able to define a load() method in the sub-classes which first calls the parent method and then execute some code. Something like:

SpecialWidget.prototype = {
    load: function(args) {
        super.load(args);
        // specific code here
    }
}

I know there's no super keyword in Javascript but there must be a way to do this. Sorry for my poor English

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5 Answers 5

up vote 32 down vote accepted

You can simulate it like this:

SpecialWidget.prototype = {
    load: function(args) {
        Widget.prototype.load.call(this, args);
        // specific code here
    }
}

Or you can create your own super property like this:

SpecialWidget.prototype.parent = Widget.prototype;

SpecialWidget.prototype = {
    load: function(args) {
        this.parent.load.call(this,args);
        // specific code here
    }
}
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1  
I guess this is the simplest solution! Thank you –  The Coding Monk Jan 24 '11 at 0:57
    
+1 short and clean. –  Christoph Mar 19 '12 at 10:28

I don't know if this is the best solution, but you could do something like this:

function Widget() {
    this.id = new Date().getTime();
}
Widget.prototype.load = function(args) {
   alert( 'parent load' );
};

SpecialWidget = function(){};

   // Make the prototype of SpecialWidget an instance of Widget
var proto = SpecialWidget.prototype = new Widget;

   // Give the prototype a function that references the "load" from Widget
proto.parent_load = proto.load;

   // Give SpecialWidget its own "load" that first calls the parent_load
proto.load = function( args ) {
    this.parent_load( args );
    alert( 'special load' );
};

var inst = new SpecialWidget;

inst.load();

This makes the prototype of SpecialWidget an instance of Widget so that it inherits all that Widget has.

Then it makes a reference to the load() of Widget called parent_load(), and creates its own load() that calls the parent_load() when invoked.

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You can use Object.create(Thing.prototype) rather than new Thingif you don't cater for old clients. –  LeeGee Jul 3 at 16:00

so first, you set up your 'subclass' like so

function SubClass(name) {
    Super.call(this);

    // stuff here
}

SubClass.prototype = new SuperClass(null);
SubClass.prototype.constructor = SubClass;

and then you can do

SuperClass.prototype.theMethod.apply(this);

from within a subclass implementation to specifically invoke the super's implementation.

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It would be possible to store the old value of the load method in a closure, if you did your overriding like this:

function Widget() {
    this.id = new Date().getTime();
    // other fields
}

Widget.prototype = {
    load: function(args) {
        // do something
        alert("Widget Prototype Load");
    }
};

function SpecialWidget(){
};

SpecialWidget.prototype = new Widget();

(function(){
    var oldLoad = SpecialWidget.prototype.load;
    SpecialWidget.prototype.load = function(){
        oldLoad();
        alert("new Load");
    };
}());


var x = new SpecialWidget();
x.load();

It works, but I'm not sure if it's the best method.

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