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The POSIX system call putenv states that the allocated memory string cannot be freed by the caller after the call to putenv. Therefore, you cannot call putenv with an automatic variable.

Example:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <cstring>
#include <unistd.h>

int main()
{
    char envVar[] = "MYVAR=Value";
    // putenv(envVar); //ERROR!
    char *memory = static_cast<char*>(std::malloc(sizeof(envVar)));
    std::strcpy(memory, envVar);
    putenv(memory); //OK!
}

My question at this point is ... how is the environment variable memory free'd? Does one need to maintain their on separate storage and constantly remove things from the environment? I.e.

#include <cstdlib>
#include <cstring>
#include <string>
#include <map>

static std::map<std::string, char*> environmentBlock;

static struct EnvironmentBlockFreer
{
    ~EnvironmentBlockFreer()
    {
        for(std::map<std::string, char*>::iterator it = environmentBlock.begin()
            it != environmentBlock.end(); ++it)
        {
            putenv(it->first.c_str()); //Remove entry from the environment
            std::free(static_cast<void *>(it->second)); //Nuke the memory
        }
    }
} EnvironmentBlockFreer_ENTRY;

int main()
{
    char envVar[] = "MYVAR=Value";
    char *memory = static_cast<char*>(std::malloc(sizeof(envVar)));
    std::strcpy(memory, envVar);
    putenv(memory); //OK!
    environmentBlock.insert(std::pair<std::string, char*>(
        "MYVAR", memory)); //Remember the values for later!
}

EDIT: It does look like I need to track this myself, at least according to Valgrind:

/* This program: */

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
        char str[] = "MYVAR=Example";
        char *mem = malloc(sizeof(str));
        strcpy(mem, str);
        putenv(mem);
}

/* Produced output:

==4219== Memcheck, a memory error detector
==4219== Copyright (C) 2002-2010, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al.
==4219== Using Valgrind-3.6.0.SVN-Debian and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info
==4219== Command: ./a.out
==4219== 
==4219== 
==4219== HEAP SUMMARY:
==4219==     in use at exit: 14 bytes in 1 blocks
==4219==   total heap usage: 2 allocs, 1 frees, 194 bytes allocated
==4219== 
==4219== LEAK SUMMARY:
==4219==    definitely lost: 14 bytes in 1 blocks
==4219==    indirectly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==4219==      possibly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==4219==    still reachable: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==4219==         suppressed: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==4219== Rerun with --leak-check=full to see details of leaked memory
==4219== 
==4219== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==4219== ERROR SUMMARY: 0 errors from 0 contexts (suppressed: 13 from 8)
*/
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I wouldn't bother with malloc/free, store strings in your map and pass their c_str to putenv. As long as you don't need the absurd feature of putenv that you can modify the environment by writing to the string, that is... –  Steve Jessop Jan 24 '11 at 2:01
    
@Steve -- these were just garbage tests I threw together in 5 mins.. not real code :) Didn't want to cause problems if putenv actually called free on the memory block so I used malloc. –  Billy ONeal Jan 24 '11 at 2:02
    
In that case I'd say, "yes, but for heaven's sake do it by surrounding putenv with a nicer C++ interface that copies user-supplied strings". –  Steve Jessop Jan 24 '11 at 2:06
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2 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Don't use putenv() if you are worried about the memory leaking.

That's why POSIX provides setenv() and unsetenv() as well - those take control of the memory and manage it.


Quoting the putenv() manual page (URL above):

The putenv() function shall use the string argument to set environment variable values. The string argument should point to a string of the form "name= value". The putenv() function shall make the value of the environment variable name equal to value by altering an existing variable or creating a new one. In either case, the string pointed to by string shall become part of the environment, so altering the string shall change the environment. The space used by string is no longer used once a new string which defines name is passed to putenv().

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No, you don't need to do that manually. Memory for your environment is freed by the OS (as part of your process memory) when your process exits.

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What about when an environment variable is overwritten? –  Billy ONeal Jan 24 '11 at 2:00
    
Valgrind doesn't seem to agree with you: pastebin.com/uF2GV8pZ –  Billy ONeal Jan 24 '11 at 2:07
1  
I guess that if either you make a lot of changes to the environment, or else you're using a leak detector and want to eliminate false positives; then just leaking the memory to be cleaned up by the OS is unacceptable. In principle there's nothing special here about the environment, you could just as well say that any memory can be leaked, especially if it's an O(1) quantity of memory. –  Steve Jessop Jan 24 '11 at 2:13
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