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It is my understanding that C has makefiles and include statements so you don't have singular monster size files and that you should functionally decompose your code. Therefore, if I'm right, I should be able to make functional calls across .c files if I do my headers and makes correctly.

I'm trying to do that but unfortunately I am getting an error.

The files have the following contents:

File 1)test.c:

#include<stdio.h>
#include"suc.h" 

main()
{
    printf("Hello World\n\n");
    printf("This is the number: %d \n\n", suc(6));
}

File 2)makefile:

CC=gcc
CFLAGS=-c -Wall

test: suc.o
$(CC) -Wall -o test test.c

suc.o: suc.c
$(CC) $(CFLAGS) suc.c

File 3)suc.h

#ifndef SUC_H_GUARD

#define SUC_H_GUARD

// returns the successor of i (i+1)
int suc(int i);


#endif

File 4)suc.c

#include "suc.h"

int suc(int i)
{
return i + 1;
}

When I make (make -B) the top I get:

gcc -c -Wall suc.c
gcc -Wall -o test test.c
test.c:7: warning: return type defaults to 'int'
/tmp/cc/7w7qCJ.o: In function 'main':
test.c: (.text+0x1d): undefined reference to 'suc'
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status
make: *** [test] Error 1

However: Both produce the expected results: A) This single file program works ok!

#include<stdio.h>

main()
{
    printf("Hello World\n\n");
printf("This is the number: %d \n\n", suc(6));
}

int suc(int i)
{
return i + 1;
}

B) All the files in the original but with the following change to test.c:

#include<stdio.h>
#include"suc.h" //suc() is still defined b/c suc.h is included

main()
{
    printf("Hello World\n\n");
printf("This is the number: %d \n\n", 4); //HERE! -> no function call
}

Help, please and thank you! I don't quite understand what the error messages are trying to tell me.

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3  
Technically, "C" doesn't have makefiles, although many operating systems it runs on may have them. –  David Gelhar Jan 24 '11 at 2:55
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8 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to separately compile the source files to their object files and then link the object file to get the executable test.

So you need:

CC=gcc
CFLAGS=-c -Wall

test: test.o suc.o
<tab>$(CC) -Wall -o test test.o suc.o

test.o: test.c
<tab>$(CC) $(CFLAGS) test.c

suc.o: suc.c
<tab>$(CC) $(CFLAGS) suc.c

where <tab> is a tab.


The problem in your current makefile is here:

test: suc.o
    $(CC) -Wall -o test test.c

which says test depends on suc.o and to get test you need to do:

$(CC) -Wall -o test test.c

but look at that compile/link line, it does not include any source/object file that has the suc function defined.

You can add a suc.o as:

$(CC) -Wall -o test test.c suc.o

But it is considered bad because say you change only suc.c file then your makefile will regenerate suc.o and will also have to regenerate test, but for regenerating test you are re-compiling test.c even thought it was not changed.

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Note that with many versions of make, you only need the first 4 lines of this Makefile. In fact, the single line 'test: test.o suc.o" will probably suffice. –  William Pursell Jan 24 '11 at 11:19
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In your case, you compile two files "suc.c" and "test.c" into two different object files - "suc.o" and "test.o". However, when you link your program, you specify only one object file, which makes it impossible for linker to find a definition or "suc" function. You have to correct your make files to something like:

suc.o: suc.c
    $(CC) $(CFLAGS) suc.c

test.o: test.c
    $(CC) $(CFLAGS) test.c

test: suc.o test.o
    $(CC) -Wall -o test suc.o test.o

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
I tried this ordering as opposed to the other ones (test: suc.o test.o as last opposed to first.) and it only seems to compile suc.o. I'm guessing it only tries to compile the first one then recursively compiles the rest, is that right? –  Zigu Jan 24 '11 at 4:47
    
@Zigu: it will compile test.o whenever it doesn't exist or is older than test.c. –  reinierpost Jan 24 '11 at 16:13
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You need to tell the linker to include the compiled code in suc.o (produced in the first compilation step) because the C linker is pretty stupid; it doesn't know about the function implementation by magic. (It's even occasionally useful that it is this way!)

Doing the second step of the compilation with this should work:

gcc -Wall -o test test.c suc.o
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With your solution, if suc.c is changed you'll be re-compiling test.c as well. –  codaddict Jan 24 '11 at 3:13
    
@codaddict: Not a big problem given the speed of modern computers. It's also a minimal change to make things work. –  Donal Fellows Jan 24 '11 at 9:18
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In addition to all the answers telling you to link with "suc.o", the warning return type defaults to 'int' is telling you that you have neglected to declare a return type for your main() function.

The correct definition is something like:

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
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When building test, you're not linking suc.o in.

Compile both test.c and suc.c into object files, then link them both into the final test executable.

This makefile should work (make sure you replace the spaces with tabs in the rules):

CC=gcc
CFLAGS=-c -Wall

.PHONY: all
all: test

test: test.o suc.o
    $(CC) -Wall test.o suc.o -o test

test.o: test.c
    $(CC) $(CFLAGS) test.c

suc.o: suc.c
    $(CC) $(CFLAGS) suc.c
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gcc -c file.c 

will compile file.c to object file file.o.

gcc -o test test.c 

will compile and link test.c to executable.

But in order to create the executable, you have to link with all the object files that are needed, in your case suc.o, so you have to write either

gcc -c test.c
gcc -c sic.c
gcc -o test test.o sic.o

either

gcc -o test test.c sic.c
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You are missing -c flags. –  codaddict Jan 24 '11 at 3:12
    
@codaddict: right :) –  ruslik Jan 24 '11 at 5:02
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This dependency line fails:

test: suc.o
   $(CC) -Wall -o test test.c

because you don't link with suc.o (and, btw, test depends on suc.o AND test.o)

your lines should be:

test: test.o suc.o
   $(CC) -Wall -o test test.o suc.o

test.o : test.c
   $(CC) -c test.c
share|improve this answer
    
With your solution, if suc.c is changed you'll be re-compiling test.c as well. –  codaddict Jan 24 '11 at 3:14
    
@codaddict - fixed –  KevinDTimm Jan 24 '11 at 13:30
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There are certainly already enough answers on here. One more can't hurt. Make is (generally) pretty smart. Let it use it's knowledge of standard build rules and simplify your Makefile down to the single line:

test: test.o suc.o

Do not bother giving it simple build rules, because it can generally guess them. (I'm thinking about gnu make, but most (if not all) versions will do the same thing.)

Also, as a side note, consider renaming your executable. The name "test" is the cause of much confusion, since whenever you try to run it you will unexpectedly get either the shell built-in or /bin/test.

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doesn't it seem premature to start talking about built-in functionality in make before the OP even understands what make is/does? –  KevinDTimm Jan 26 '11 at 12:45
    
@KevinDTimm Different pedagogy, I suppose. I figure it's easier to keep the details hidden when learning, and simplifying the Makefile by relying on implicit rules does that. –  William Pursell Jan 30 '11 at 1:50
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