Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class, which has a method calls all of the rest methods within the same class.

One way to do it is by using reflection framework, are there other ways?

[edit] Example code added:


import java.lang.reflect.InvocationTargetException;
import java.lang.reflect.Method;


public class AClass {

    private void aMethod(){

    }

    private void bMethod(){

    }

    private void cMethod(){

    }

    private void dMethod(){

    }

    //50 more methods. 

    //method call the rest
    public void callAll() throws IllegalArgumentException, IllegalAccessException, InvocationTargetException{
        Method[] methods = this.getClass().getMethods();
        for (Method m : methods) {
            if (m.getName().endsWith("Method")) {
                //do stuff..
            }
        }
    }

}

I actually don't have a problem with calling all 4 methods from callAll(), i.e. avoid using reflection. But one of my colleagues pointed out that what if there are 50 methods, are you going to call them one by one? I don't have an answer for that, that's why I am asking the question here.

Thanks, Sarah

share|improve this question
3  
Why would you want to do that? –  finnw Jan 24 '11 at 3:09
1  
Could you show some code? Because I have trouble understanding what you're trying to accomplish. –  Etienne de Martel Jan 24 '11 at 3:11
3  
@Sarah, why didn't your coworker point out that, "... why are you doing this?" - I think that's a much more interesting question. –  EmacsFodder Jan 24 '11 at 3:27
1  
@Sarah, yes, I think it's more interesting to understand why someone would want to do this, it seems like the class structure is being abused, for example, a better way to implement this list of calls is using a set of command classes, (implementing an ICommand interface, which requires an execute method, and then just pushing them through a loop.) If you have a class that has 50 methods and they are all supposed to be run by another method in the same class, it is a textbook example of breaking the single responsibility principle. –  EmacsFodder Jan 24 '11 at 3:57
1  
Although reflection will work, this is the perfect time to take a step back and redesign your class. –  biziclop Jan 24 '11 at 17:15
show 5 more comments

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm pretty sure that anything you end up doing is going to ultimately boil down to reflection anyways; eg: aspects, DI, etc. So I don't know what the gain would be - convenience maybe?

share|improve this answer
    
Hey, can you please give some info or links about aspects and DI? –  Greenhorn Jan 24 '11 at 3:24
    
Forget it, it's not relevant here (but try Wiki or Google, DI = dependency injection here). Reflection is the way how methods can be enumerated. You could analyze the class-file instead using e.g., cglib, but I don't thing it'd be any better. As everybody else, I'm asking "why do you want it"? –  maaartinus Jan 24 '11 at 3:44
    
@Greenhorn, relevant or not here you go. –  javamonkey79 Jan 24 '11 at 4:41
add comment

Actually, you'd probably want to use Class.getDeclaredMethods(). Class.getMethods() only returns public methods and none of the methods you show are public (and it also returns the public methods inherited from super classes).

That said: In the scenario you mention, reflection is a valid approach. All other (manual) approaches would be error-prone.

However, using a naming convention seems to weak to me as a guard. I'd write a custom annotation, and if that is present, I'd execute the method. Example:

@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@Target(ElementType.METHOD)
public @interface RunMe {}

And here's your modified code:

public void callAll() throws
IllegalArgumentException, IllegalAccessException, InvocationTargetException{
    Method[] methods = this.getClass().getDeclaredMethods();
    for (Method m : methods) {
        if (m.getAnnotation(RunMe.class)!=null) {
            //do stuff..
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Write the callAll() method to actually call each method explicitly without reflection.

This allows for flexibility in subclassing. It also allows you to deal with methods which have parameters. It also allows you to bypass methods which don't apply. Most importantly, it makes it really easy to change your code when requirements change and this blanket rule no longer applies.

"Calling all methods on a class" is just not a valid use-case. I've seen JUnit call all methods without arguments beginning with "test" to do test cases. That's about the closest I've come, and if your goal is to do something like this, then you are on the right track. If you were working on something like this, though, I don't think you'd be looking for alternatives to reflection.

share|improve this answer
    
Junit4 uses java.lang.reflect.Method.getAnnotation(Class<? extends Annotation>) != null to filter @Test methods, so it's also reflect. –  卢声远 Shengyuan Lu Jan 24 '11 at 4:53
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.