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Ok, I got an activity, that when it starts, it loads an image from the internet, and, trying to save memory, when the activity is left (the back button being pressed), I want the activity to dump (get rid of all the strings and images that are in it). So, I figure the best way to do this is to just kill the activity. Well, I cant seem to figure out the callback for when the backbutton is pressed, so I have been trying to use the onPause and onStop callbacks for the task, but botch ways force close my app. Im trying this

public void onPause() {
this.finish();
}
public void onStop() {
finish();
}

Ive tried multiple variations of this, but none of them seem to work. Any ideas?

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what are you exactly looking for?to finish current activity on back ?button –  chikka.anddev Jan 24 '11 at 4:52

5 Answers 5

up vote 19 down vote accepted

add this to your activity

@Override
public boolean onKeyDown(int keyCode, KeyEvent event)
{
    if ((keyCode == KeyEvent.KEYCODE_BACK))
    {
        finish();
    }
    return super.onKeyDown(keyCode, event);
}
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1  
What's the point? Pressing the back button will automatically go down the activity stack. finish() just makes sure that you can't go back. (That said, the question is admittedly vague.) –  EboMike Jan 24 '11 at 5:38
1  
of course but the activity is killed is not certain on press of back button so to kill finish is important and thats what asked in question but since releasing up memory goes its done automatically by OS –  ingsaurabh Jan 24 '11 at 5:46
1  
Absolutely not. If the activity is not in front, it can be reclaimed by the OS. Finished or not. –  EboMike Jan 24 '11 at 5:51
10  
Besides, I see this hack with KEYCODE_BACK a lot around here. What if the user presses the HOME button? What if the user holds the HOME button to pick a different app? What if the app switched because of a phone call? OR a notification? In most cases, if you're checking for KEYCODE_BACK, you're doing it wrong. –  EboMike Jan 24 '11 at 5:54
1  
Answer by EboMike below is the correct answer. Finishing the activity does NOT necessarily release memory. –  A.J. Dec 15 '14 at 22:14

Simple Override onBackPressed Method:

    @Override
    public void onBackPressed() {
            super.onBackPressed();
            this.finish();
    }
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public boolean onKeyDown(int keycode, KeyEvent event) {
    if (keycode == KeyEvent.KEYCODE_BACK) {
        moveTaskToBack(true);
    }
    return super.onKeyDown(keycode, event);
}

My app closed with above code.

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Well, if you study the structure of how the application life-cycle works,here , then you'll come to know that onPause() is called when another activity gains focus, and onStop() is called when the activity is no longer visible.

From what I have learned yet, you can call finish() only from the activity which is active and/or has the focus. If you're calling finish() from the onPause() method that means you're calling it when the activity is no longer active. thus an exception is thrown.

When you're calling finish() from onStop() then the activity is being sent to background, thus will no longer be visible, then this exception.

When you press the back button, onStop() is called.

Most probably, Android will automatically do for you what you are currently wanting to do.

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First of all, finish() doesn't destroy your process and free up the memory. It just removes the activity from the activity stack. You'd need to kill the process, which is answered in a bunch of questions (since this is being asked several times).

But the proper answer is - Don't do it. the Android OS will automatically free up memory when it needs memory. By not freeing up memory, your app will start up faster if the user gets back to it.

Please see here for a great write-up on the topic.

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6  
If the activity is using alot of resources, then why not kill it from inside of your application as opposed to wait for the GC? Thats a whole nother process that would have to run through, hence slowing the phone down. Good memory management is making every attempt to manage it within the program itself. Thats why most managed programming languages and ide's automatically put in self cleanup code into the program, and its also the reason why you are giving the life cycle, so that you may manage memory the best you can from within your applicatoin. –  Shaun Jan 26 '11 at 4:17
1  
Shaun is right, good memory management is making every attempt to manage it within the program itself. –  dns Aug 18 '13 at 11:09

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