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For string parameters, we have to sanitize them in the action method as follows:

public ActionResult Browse(string genre)
{
        string message = HttpUtility.HtmlEncode(genre);

        return View(message);
}

Is it necessary to sanitize non-string params as follows?

    public ActionResult Details(int id)
    {
        int data = int.Parse(HttpUtility.HtmlEncode(id));
        return View(data);
    }
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4  
That doesn't look like sanitizing, you're Html encoding the params. Sanitizing would be cleaning input from a user so it doesn't nobble your database. HTML encoding is so that you don't get incorrect characters displaying. There's probably no harm in not encoding an int given that you can guarantee it is actually an int. I'm used to PHP where you never know what type the variable is. –  Endophage Jan 24 '11 at 6:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Personally, I recommend sanitizing these inputs in the view. If you're using the WebForms view engine, you can use <%: ... %> to do this, or if you're using Razor you can use the @ operator. This also makes the flow of the data through the system view-independent, so your data and models can be shared more readily.

For example, HTML-encoding data before storing it in the database makes it very difficult to create at some future date a view which outputs the data as a CSV file. If the view is responsible for doing this, then the view can choose CSV-encoding or HTML-encoding as appropriate for its own application.

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Is saving the user input without sanitizing vulnerable to SQL-injection attack? –  xport Jan 24 '11 at 7:03
3  
@xport - If you're using LinqToSql, EF, or some other similar ORM framework, they handle escaping input strings on your behalf. If you're generating INSERT statements by hand, use Parameterized SQL (bing.com/search?setmkt=en-US&q=parameterized+sql) to protect yourself against SQL injection. The particular syntax for Parameterized SQL depends on your data layer. –  Levi Jan 24 '11 at 19:07

For string parameters, we have to sanitize them in the action method as follows:

public ActionResult Browse(string genre) {

string message = HttpUtility.HtmlEncode(genre);

return View(message); 

}

You shouldn't be doing anything like this in a controller action. If you intend to store this string into a database, go ahead and store it as is. A database doesn't care much about unencoded HTML. Of course when the time comes to output this to your view you will need to ensure that it is properly encoded:

<%= Html.Encode(message) %> // WebForms ASP.NET 2.0
<%: message %> // WebForms ASP.NET 4.0
@message // Razor ASP.NET 4.0
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"saving unencoded HTML in a database" is vulnerable to sql injection? –  xport Jan 24 '11 at 7:13
1  
@xport, of course that it is not vulnerable. You just should use parametrized queries when building your SQL queries instead string concatenations but you are already using them, aren't you? –  Darin Dimitrov Jan 24 '11 at 7:17
    
I use Entity Framework. –  xport Jan 24 '11 at 7:18
1  
@xport, then you should be pretty safe. Not 100% guarantee of course because I haven't seen your code. –  Darin Dimitrov Jan 24 '11 at 7:18

If you're using MVC, there is no reason to send the data to the view with HtmlEncode for really any reason. The reason for this is because you can do it much easier in the view it's self.

<!-- WEB FORMS VIEW ENGINE -->
<!-- This is already encoded -->
<%: Model.genre %>

<!-- This is NOT encoded -->
<%= Model.genre %>



<!-- RAZOR  VIEW ENGINE -->
<!-- This is already encoded -->
@Model.genre

<!-- This is NOT encoded -->
@MvcHtmlString.Create(Model.genre)

As for sanitizing, that's a different ball of wax all together. Jeff Atwood has some code here and talks about it here. Remember, you can store whatever user input in the database, it's the output that needs sanitizing AND html encoding.

As for encoding non-string parameters. It's usually not necessary, however the difference between <%: Model.genre %> and <%= Model.genre %> is pretty insignificant in your development time.

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