Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to calculate the total size of all .mobi files from this link (it's a good link by the way).

In my attempt of making this as my learning experience, I have made a 'pipe' (let's call it a) that output all the sizes from that page which looks like:

189K
20M
549K
2.2M
1.9M
3.1M
2.5M
513K
260K
1.1M
2.8M
5.1M
3.7M
1.5M
5.6M
1.0M
5.6M
1.5M
4.9M
3.4M
810K

My target is to get the total size (ex: 50.50M, or 50000K) - sum of all these numbers. My question is, how to calculate that target, using pipeling (a | some_other_commands). Answers using python or any other language (preferably one liners) are welcome. Thanks a lot.

share|improve this question
    
I'm a python guy. No one with any pythonish answer? –  wakandan Jan 24 '11 at 11:05
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

For the fun a solution in shell:

a | sed -e 's/M$/ 1024 * +/'  -e 's/K$/ +/'  | dc -e '0' -f - -e 'p'
share|improve this answer
    
This is marvelous . One new command to learn. Thanks a lot. –  wakandan Jan 24 '11 at 11:00
    
+1, really nice. –  codaddict Jan 25 '11 at 9:49
add comment

Perl one-liner:

a | perl -ne 's/^([\d.]+)M$/$1*1024/e;$sum+=$_; END{print $sum."K"}'

see it

It assumes that all entries are in either Kilobytes or Megabytes as shown in OPs input.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Sigh, someone says “one-liner” and all my code-golf reflexes fire...

ruby -e 'puts $<.read.split.inject(0){ |m,e| m += e.to_f * { "M" => 1, "K" => 0.001 }[e[-1,1]]}.to_s+"M"'

or, with some shortcuts...

ruby -ne 'p @e=@e.to_f+$_.to_f*{"M"=>1,"K"=>0.001}[$_[-2,1]]'

Update: Heh, ok, hard to read. The OP asked for a "one liner". :-)

#!/usr/bin/env ruby
total = 0
while s = gets                                       # get line
  scalefactorMK = s.chomp[-1,1]                      # get the M or K
  scalefactor = { 'M'=>1,'K'=>0.001 }[scalefactorMK] # get numeric scale
  total += s.to_f * scalefactor                      # accumulate total
end
puts "%5.1fM" % [total]
share|improve this answer
    
I would say this is not for a beginner like me. Thanks. :D –  wakandan Jan 24 '11 at 11:03
    
Who says perl is difficult to read ;-) –  gabuzo Jan 24 '11 at 13:40
add comment

if you have Ruby (1.9+)

require 'net/http'
url="http://hewgill.com/~greg/stackoverflow/ebooks/"
response = Net::HTTP.get_response( URI.parse(url) )
data=response.body
total=0
data.split("\n").each do |x|
    if x=~/\.mobi/
        size = x.split(/\s+/)[-1]
        c = case size[-1]
            when 'K' then 1024
            when 'M' then 1024 * 1024
            when 'G' then 1024 * 1024 * 1024
        end
        total+=size[0..-1].to_i * c
    end
end
puts "Total size: %.2f MB" %  ( total/(1024.0 * 1024.0) )
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Kurumi. This is not exactly what I meant by "one liner" :)). Your ruby looks good though. Thanks. –  wakandan Jan 24 '11 at 11:04
add comment

awk (assume files less than 1K don't substantially add to the total):

a | awk '/K/ {sum += $1/1024} /M/ {sum += $1} END {printf("%.2fM\n", sum)}'
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.