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I know I can delegate the subscription of my event to another event,

public event EventHandler MyEvent
{
    add { SomeClass.AnotherEvent += value; }
    remove { SomeClass.AnotherEvent -= value; }
}

In this case, if AnotherEvent is raised, then MyEvent will be raised as well.

However in my class I cannot raise MyEvent() on my own as usual, because it says: Error 3 The event 'MyEvent' can only appear on the left hand side of += or -=

I assume this is because the delegation of the subscription above.

Is it possible that I can delegate a subscription as well as invoke it on my own? The objective is so that MyEvent can be raised by two things, AnotherEvent as well as my own code.

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With which code do you try to raise "MyEvent"? –  TToni Jan 24 '11 at 9:10
    
just some code in my method, like MyEvent(this); –  Louis Rhys Jan 24 '11 at 9:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, you can - but you'll need your own delegate variable. You could either subscribe to SomeClass.AnotherEvent once and call your own delegate when that event is raised, or just keep subscribers twice:

private EventHandler myEvent;

public event EventHandler MyEvent
{
    add
    {
        myEvent += value;
        SomeClass.AnotherEvent += value;
    }
    remove
    {
        myEvent -= value;
        SomeClass.AnotherEvent -= value;
    }
}

Note that if you go for the "subscribe to SomeClass.AnotherEvent once" approach, you may want to consider only subscribing when you first see a subscription to MyEvent, and unsubscribing when myEvent becomes null after unsubscription. It can all get quite tricky in terms of disposal...

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by "subscribe to SomeClass.AnotherEvent once" you mean Pete's and Akash's answers? –  Louis Rhys Jan 24 '11 at 9:19
    
@Louis: And Akash's, yes. –  Jon Skeet Jan 24 '11 at 9:21
    
ok thanks. I thought of their solutions too and I imagined it would get tricky like you said. Your solution didn't occur to me, and I think it's much better. Thanks! –  Louis Rhys Jan 24 '11 at 9:25

You will have to wire up your other someclass's event..

// constructor or initializer..

SomeClass.AnotherEvent += (s,e)=>{
   if(MyEvent != null){
      MyEvent(s,e);
   }
};

// let this be implicit default event
public event EventHandler MyEvent;

protected void RaiseMyEvent(){
    if(MyEvent != null){
        MyEvent(this,EventArgs.Empty);
    }
}
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You need to invoke the delegate itself, not the event property. Because MyEvent doesn't have a backing field, that means you would have to invoke the backing field of SomeClass.AnotherEvent, which (usually) only SomeClass can do. As others have stated there are ways around this. See their answers.

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I don't think you can, and if you could, I don't think that it would be logical. So I would implement the event normally, and then add an event handler to your class that listens to events from the other class.

You're basically making a class that has an event that is fired when something happens internally in the class AND something happens in a dependent class. I think that the implementation should reflect this. For example:

public MyClass()
{
    this.other = new SomeClass;
    other.AnotherEvent += SomeClass_AnotherEvent;
}
public event EventHandler MyEvent;
private void SomeClass_AnotherEvent(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
     if (MyEvent != null)
         MyEvent(this, e); // I think that it would be most logical, that you do not pass the sender
}
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