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I have a MySQL database with a pretty simple schema. There are parent, child and access tables.

parent stores 51 fields that are all varchar (ranging in length from 16 to 512) except for for 4 longtext fields and the primary key which is a bigint. Besides the primary key, there are indexes on 3 other fields. One so that the child table can refer to it as a foreign key.

child stores 23 fields that are mostly varchar with some text fields. A varchar(256) field is used as the foreign key to link it to parent. The actual contents of the foreign key field are all expected to be shorter than 60 characters, though.

accesss has a bigint field and a varchar field that together make up the primary key and the bigint field is the foreign key that links it to parent.

The access table is used to specify which users have access to which records from parent. There may be multiple users who should have access to any record.

There are around 2e6 rows in parent (and therefore access) and around 2e7 rows in child. EDIT: Sorry, access has 5329840 rows. i.e. there are one or more rows in access for every row in parent.

The above schema is based on an old FileMaker database that we're looking to migrate to MySQL. I am sure it is not ideal, but I don't know exactly why.

Queries are fast or pretty slow depending on the parameters. So, e.g. the following query will take a second or two if there are several records that bob has access to. The query will take several minutes (e.g. 12 minutes), though, if there are no records that user bob has access to (e.g. if there is no user called bob):

SELECT
    p."RecordID", p."SerialNumber", p."Folder", p."NoteType",
    p."FirstName", p."LastName", p."DOB", p."Body", p."From",
    p."DateTxt", a."UserName" AS Access
FROM parent AS p
INNER JOIN access AS a ON a."RecordID" = p."RecordID"
WHERE p."RecordID" > 123
AND a."UserName" = 'bob'
ORDER BY p."RecordID"
LIMIT 500;

Here's what EXPLAIN says about the query:

+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+---------------------+--------+--------------------------+
| id | select_type | table | type   | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref                 | rows   | Extra                    |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+---------------------+--------+--------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | p     | range  | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 8       | NULL                | 731752 | Using where              |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | a     | eq_ref | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 74      | db.p.RecordID,const |      1 | Using where; Using index |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+---------------------+--------+--------------------------+
2 rows in set (0.01 sec)

So, is there some way to speed up the non-matching queries? Could this be caused by using varchar/text fields for everything? Would using a varchar(256) field as a foreign key cause problems (although it's not used in the above query)? Or is the query to blame?

EDIT: I've just realised that the PRIMARY KEY ("RecordID", "UserName") on the access table is not being used for SELECT ... FROM access WHERE UserName = 'blah'. I've created an index on the UserName column and that appears to have fixed the problem. I'd still appreciate it if anyone has advice.

Current output of EXPLAIN:

+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+---------------------+--------+--------------------------+
| id | select_type | table | type   | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref                 | rows   | Extra                    |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+---------------------+--------+--------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | p     | range  | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 8       | NULL                | 605020 | Using where              |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | a     | eq_ref | PRIMARY,UNidx | PRIMARY | 74      | db.p.RecordID,const |      1 | Using where; Using index |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+---------------------+--------+--------------------------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

EDIT: @DRapp's suggestion does make a huge difference. The query is fast with or without the index on access.UserName. If I drop the index and try DRapp's query without the STRAIGHT_JOIN, then it is again slow.

DRapp's query without index on access.UserName:

mysql> explain SELECT STRAIGHT_JOIN p."RecordID", p."SerialNumber", p."Folder", p."NoteType", p."FirstName", p."LastName", p."DOB", p."Body", p."From", p."DateTxt", a."UserName" AS Access     FROM access as a, parent AS p where a."UserName" = 'bob' and a."RecordID" > 123 and a."RecordID" = p."RecordID" order by a."RecordID" limit 500;
+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+---------------+---------+--------------------------+
| id | select_type | table | type   | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref           | rows    | Extra                    |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+---------------+---------+--------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | a     | range  | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 8       | NULL          | 2382668 | Using where; Using index |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | p     | eq_ref | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 8       | bb.a.RecordID |       1 |                          |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+---------------+---------+--------------------------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

Same query with the index on access.UserName:

mysql> explain SELECT STRAIGHT_JOIN ...;
+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+---------------+---------+--------------------------+
| id | select_type | table | type   | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref           | rows    | Extra                    |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+---------------+---------+--------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | a     | ref    | PRIMARY,UNidx | UNidx   | 66      | const         | 1209780 | Using where; Using index |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | p     | eq_ref | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 8       | db.a.RecordID |       1 |                          |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+---------------+---------+--------------------------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

Same query without the index on access.UserName and without the STRAIGHT_JOIN:

mysql> explain SELECT p."RecordID", p."SerialNumber", p."Folder", p."NoteType", p."FirstName", p."LastName", p."DOB", p."Body", p."From", p."DateTxt", a."UserName" AS Access FROM access as a, parent AS p where a."UserName" = 'zzz' and a."RecordID" > 123 and a."RecordID" = p."RecordID" order by a."RecordID" limit 500;
+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+---------------------+--------+----------------------------------------------+
| id | select_type | table | type   | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref                 | rows   | Extra                                        |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+---------------------+--------+----------------------------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | p     | range  | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 8       | NULL                | 484016 | Using where; Using temporary; Using filesort |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | a     | eq_ref | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 74      | db.p.RecordID,const |      1 | Using where; Using index                     |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+---------------+---------+---------+---------------------+--------+----------------------------------------------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I've always had good luck using the "STRAIGHT_JOIN" clause in MySQL, and putting the primary table basis as first in the list of qualifiers. In this case, your "Access" table looking for Bob, THEN looking at the records Bob has access to see. If it fails at the ACCESS query, no need to look deeper. Additionally, since the join is based on same "RecordID", I've changed references to the "a." table. Since this query is based on username first, I would have a key on it too. I'd be interested in its Explain, and performance too.

SELECT STRAIGHT_JOIN
      p."RecordID",
      p."SerialNumber",
      p."Folder",
      p."NoteType",
      p."FirstName", 
      p."LastName", 
      p."DOB",
      p."Body",
      p."From",
      p."DateTxt", 
      a."UserName" AS Access 
   FROM 
      access as a,
      parent AS p 
   where 
          a."UserName" = 'bob'
      and a."RecordID" > 123
      and a."RecordID" = p."RecordID"
   order by
      a."RecordID"
   limit 
      500
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Never heard of STRAIGHT_JOIN before. Looking it up. –  Wodin Jan 24 '11 at 12:16
    
@Wodin, Yeah, it tells the optimizer, don't think for me, I know the order I put the tables and the join conditions... Use that sequence. It came in quite well for gov't data of 14+ million rows with 15+ joins to lookup tables. The optimizer tried to use a smaller table and join back to 14+ million table and choked. –  DRapp Jan 24 '11 at 12:25
    
yes thanks, I know :) I upvoted your answer. Just waiting to see if I get any other answer before marking it as answered. e.g. I'm still not sure what impact having pretty much all fields as varchar/text has and also whether using a varchar(256) field as a foreign key is a terrible thing to do. I have only left one question as unanswered before this one, but that one has zero answers and in retrospect probably doesn't belong on stackoverflow. So my acceptance is 50% at the moment because I've only asked 4 questions. It will go up to 75% as soon as I mark this question as answered –  Wodin Jan 24 '11 at 13:03

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