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Why the order of declaration important for Java enums, I mean why does this give (compile time) errors

public enum ErrorCodes {
    public int id;
    Undefined;
}

but this one is fine:

public enum ErrorCodes {
    Undefined;
    public int id;

}.
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Because this is the syntax for enums. It could allow different orders however this may have been open to mistakes such as forgetting to place a type on a field and turning it into a enum value.

EDIT: The reason I say they could be in any order is that fields, methods, initialisers and constructors can be in any order. I believe the restriction is valid if it is to reduce mistakes. Even though fields/constructors/methods can be in any order its very common to see them in that order for readability.

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+1 - If the order wasn't tied down, enums would be harder to read, the syntax would be harder to parse, and syntax error messages would be less comprehensible. –  Stephen C Jan 24 '11 at 10:00
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It's not a very satisfying answer, but it's just how enums are defined in Java. See section 8.9 Enums in The Java Language Specification.

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Java Enum is a special kind of class. Its simple and mostly useful form does not contain custom fields:

public enum ErrorCodes {
    Undefined, Defined, Foo, Bar
}

Compiler magic creates class that looks approximately like the following:

public class ErrorCodes {
    public final static ErrorCodes Undefined = new ErrorCodes();
    public final static ErrorCodes Defined = new ErrorCodes();
    public final static ErrorCodes Foo = new ErrorCodes();
    public final static ErrorCodes Bar = new ErrorCodes();
}

This compiler magic expects the fields definition right after the enum header.

Sun were so kind to allow us to add such fields that follow the definition of eunum members: public enum ErrorCodes { Undefined, Defined, Foo, Bar; private String myField; }

This is the reason that your custom code always must be defined after the enum fields.

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It is not "compiler magic" ... it is common or garden "syntax". –  Stephen C Jan 24 '11 at 10:02
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