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The general advise is that you should not call GC.Collect from your code, but what are the exceptions to this rule?

I can only think of a few very specific cases where it may make sense to force a garbage collection.

One example that springs to mind is a service, that wakes up at intervals, performs some task, and then sleeps for a long time. In this case, it may be a good idea to force a collect to prevent the soon-to-be-idle process from holding on to more memory than needed.

Are there any other cases where it is acceptable to call GC.Collect?

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17 Answers 17

up vote 73 down vote accepted

If you have good reason to believe that a significant set of objects - particularly those you suspect to be in generations 1 and 2 - are now eligible for garbage collection, and that now would be an appropriate time to collect in terms of the small performance hit.

A good example of this is if you've just closed a large form. You know that all the UI controls can now be garbage collected, and a very short pause as the form is closed probably won't be noticeable to the user.

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3  
According to MS source code calling GC.Collect(2) every 850ms is just fine. Don't believe? Then just see PresentationCore.dll, MS.Internal.MemoryPressure.ProcessAdd(). I currently have an image processing app (small images, nothing with real memory pressure) where calling GC.Collect(2) takes longer than 850ms and so the entire app gets frozen by this (app spending 99.7% of time in GC). –  springy76 Sep 18 '11 at 15:52
11  
@springy76: Being done by Microsoft in one place doesn't mean it's deemed a good thing by those giving advice from Microsoft... –  Jon Skeet Sep 18 '11 at 16:00
4  
@Downvoter: Care to comment? –  Jon Skeet Sep 29 '11 at 21:30
2  
I don't like that example. What's the poing in doing it after form close? One good example I see is for after loading game level on XBox or WindowsPhone. On those platforms GC runs after allocating 1MB or sth like that. So it's good to allocate as much as you can during loading of the level (while showing some splash screen) and then do GC.Collect to try to avoid collections during the game. –  Peri Dec 20 '11 at 21:22
3  
@Peri: The point of doing it after form close is that you've just made a bunch of objects (controls, the data you were displaying) eligible for garbage collection - so by calling GC.Collect you're basically telling the garbage collector that you know better than it for a change. Why don't you like the example? –  Jon Skeet Dec 20 '11 at 21:52

I use GC.Collect only when writing crude performance/profiler test rigs; i.e. I have two (or more) blocks of code to test - something like:

GC.Collect(GC.MaxGeneration, GCCollectionMode.Forced);
TestA(); // may allocate lots of transient objects
GC.Collect(GC.MaxGeneration, GCCollectionMode.Forced);
TestB(); // may allocate lots of transient objects
GC.Collect(GC.MaxGeneration, GCCollectionMode.Forced);
...

So that TestA() and TestB() run with as similar state as possible - i.e. TestB() doesn't yet hammered just because TestA left it very close to the tipping point.

A classic example would be a simple console exe (a Main method sort-enough to be posted here for example), that shows the difference between looped string concatenation and StringBuilder.

If I need something precise, then this would be two completely independent tests - but often this is enough if we just want to minimize (or normalize) the GC during the tests to get a rough feel for the behaviour.

During production code? I have yet to use it ;-p

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1  
And I probably add "WaitForPendingFinalizers" (or whatever it is) too in this case ;-p –  Marc Gravell Jan 25 '09 at 23:07

The best practise is to not force a garbage collection in most cases. (Every system I have worked on that had forced garbage collections, had underlining problems that if solved would have removed the need to forced the garbage collection, and speeded the system up greatly.)

There are a few cases when you know more about memory usage then the garbage collector does. This is unlikely to be true in a multi user application, or a service that is responding to more then one request at a time.

However in some batch type processing you do know more then the GC. E.g. consider an application that.

  • Is given a list of file names on the command line
  • Processes a single file then write the result out to a results file.
  • While processing the file, creates a lot of interlinked objects that can not be collected until the processing of the file have complete (e.g. a parse tree)
  • Does not keep match state between the files it has processed.

You may be able to make a case (after careful) testing that you should force a full garbage collection after you have process each file.

Another cases is a service that wakes up every few minutes to process some items, and does not keep any state while it’s asleep. Then forcing a full collection just before going to sleep may be worthwhile.

The only time I would consider forcing a collection is when I know that a lot of object had been created recently and very few objects are currently referenced.

I would rather have a garbage collection API when I could give it hints about this type of thing without having to force a GC my self.

See also "Rico Mariani's Performance Tidbits"

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One case is when you are trying to unit test code that uses WeakReference.

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Have a look at this article by Rico Mariani. He gives two rules when to call GC.Collect (rule 1 is: "Don't"):

When to call GC.Collect()

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Been there already. I'm not trying to find excuses for doing something that you shouldn't do, but I would like to know if there are any specific cases where it would be acceptable. –  Brian Rasmussen Jan 25 '09 at 20:25

In large 24/7 or 24/6 systems -- systems that react to messages, RPC requests or that poll a database or process continuously -- it is useful to have a way to identify memory leaks. For this, I tend to add a mechanism to the application to temporarily suspend any processing and then perform full garbage collection. This puts the system into a quiescent state where the memory remaining is either legitimately long lived memory (caches, configuration, &c.) or else is 'leaked' (objects that are not expected or desired to be rooted but actually are).

Having this mechanism makes it a lot easier to profile memory usage as the reports will not be clouded with noise from active processing.

To be sure you get all of the garbage, you need to perform two collections:

GC.Collect();
GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
GC.Collect();

As the first collection will cause any objects with finalizers to be finalized (but not actually garbage collect these objects). The second GC will garbage collect these finalized objects.

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I've seen the two-pass collection in a couple of places now, but after reading the passage in the MSDN documentation for GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers that says:" Wait for all finalizers to complete before continuing. Without this call to GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers, the worker loop below might execute at the same time as the finalizers. With this call, the worker loop executes only after all finalizers have been called." I'm just a touch paranoid. Do you know of a definitive source for doing two passes? –  jerhewet Jun 24 '11 at 23:45
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@jerhewet: The key to understanding why two collections are required is with understanding what happens to objects with finalizers. Unfortunately I don't have exactly what you're asking for, but have a read of this article and this question on SO. –  Paul Ruane Jun 27 '11 at 11:59

You can call GC.Collect() when you know something about the nature of the app that the garbage collector doesn't. It's tempting to think that, as the author, this is very likely. However, the truth is that the GC amounts to a pretty well-written and tested expert system, and it's rare that you'll know something about the low level code paths that it doesn't.

The best example I can think of where you might have some extra information is a app that cycles between idle periods and very busy periods. You want the best performance possible for the very busy periods and therefore want to use the idle time to do some clean up.

However, most of the time the GC is smart enough to do this anyway.

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The short answer is: never!

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3  
Not even in this situation? –  romkyns Nov 21 '11 at 13:47

In your example, I think that calling GC.Collect isn't the issue, but rather there is a design issue.

If you are going to wake up at intervals, (set times) then your program should be crafted for a single execution (perform the task once) and then terminate. Then, you set the program up as a scheduled task to run at the scheduled intervals.

This way, you don't have to concern yourself with calling GC.Collect, (which you should rarely if ever, have to do).

That being said, Rico Mariani has a great blog post on this subject, which can be found here:

http://blogs.msdn.com/ricom/archive/2004/11/29/271829.aspx

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I agree that would be a good solution as well. –  Brian Rasmussen Jan 25 '09 at 20:12

Scott Holden's blog entry on when to (and when not to) call GC.Collect is specific to the .NET Compact Framework, but the rules generally apply to all managed development.

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using(var stream = new MemoryStream())
{
   bitmap.Save(stream, ImageFormat.Png);
   techObject.Last().Image = Image.FromStream(stream);
   bitmap.Dispose();

   // Without this code, I had an OutOfMemory exception.
   GC.Collect();
   GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
   //
}
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There are some situations where it is better safe than sorry.

Here is one situation.

It is possible to author an unmanaged DLL in C# using IL rewrites (because there are situations where this is necessary).

Now suppose, for example, the DLL creates an array of bytes at the class level - because many of the exported functions need access to such. What happens when the DLL is unloaded? Is the garbage collector automatically called at that point? I don't know, but being an unmanaged DLL it is entirely possible the GC isn't called. And it would be a big problem if it wasn't called. When the DLL is unloaded so too would be the garbage collector - so who is going to be responsible for collecting any possible garbage and how would they do it? Better to employ C#'s garbage collector. Have a cleanup function (available to the DLL client) where the class level variables are set to null and the garbage collector called.

Better safe than sorry.

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One useful place to call GC.Collect() is in a unit test when you want to verify that you are not creating a memory leak (e. g. if you are doing something with WeakReferences or ConditionalWeakTable, dynamically generated code, etc).

For example, I have a few tests like:

WeakReference w = CodeThatShouldNotMemoryLeak();
Assert.IsTrue(w.IsAlive);
GC.Collect();
GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
Assert.IsFalse(w.IsAlive);

It could be argued that using WeakReferences is a problem in and of itself, but it seems that if you are creating a system that relies on such behavior then calling GC.Collect() is a good way to verify such code.

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As a memory fragmentation solution. I was getting out of memory exceptions while writing a lot of data into a memory stream (reading from a network stream). The data was written in 8K chunks. After reaching 128M there was exception even though there was a lot of memory available (but it was fragmented). Calling GC.Collect() solved the issue. I was able to handle over 1G after the fix.

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i am still pretty unsure about this. I am working since 7 years on an Application Server. Our bigger installations take use of 24 GB Ram. Its hightly Multithreaded, and ALL calls for GC.Collect() ran into really terrible performance issues.

Many third party Components used GC.Collect() when they thought it was clever to do this right now. So a simple bunch of Excel-Reports blocked the App Server for all threads several times a minute.

We had to refactor all the 3rd Party Components in order to remove the GC.Collect() calls, and all worked fine after doing this.

But i am running Servers on Win32 as well, and here i started to take heavy use of GC.Collect() after getting a OutOfMemoryException.

But i am also pretty unsure about this, because i often noticed, when i get a OOM on 32 Bit, and i retry to run the same Operation again, without calling GC.Collect(), it just worked fine.

One thing i wonder is the OOM Exception itself... If i would have written the .Net Framework, and i can't alloc a memory block, i would use GC.Collect(), defrag memory (??), try again, and if i still cant find a free memory block, then i would throw the OOM-Exception.

Or at least make this behavior as configurable option, due the drawbacks of the performance issue with GC.Collect.

Now i have lots of code like this in my app to "solve" the problem:

public static TResult ExecuteOOMAware<T1, T2, TResult>(Func<T1,T2 ,TResult> func, T1 a1, T2 a2)
{

    int oomCounter = 0;
    int maxOOMRetries = 10;
    do
    {
        try
        {
            return func(a1, a2);
        }
        catch (OutOfMemoryException)
        {
            oomCounter++;
            if (maxOOMRetries > 10)
            {
                throw;
            }
            else
            {
                Log.Info("OutOfMemory-Exception caught, Trying to fix. Counter: " + oomCounter.ToString());
                System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(oomCounter * 10));
                GC.Collect();
            }
        }
    } while (oomCounter < maxOOMRetries);

    // never gets hitted.
    return default(TResult);
}

(Note that the Thread.Sleep() behavior is a really App apecific behavior, because we are running a ORM Caching Service, and the service takes some time to release all the cached objects, if RAM exceeds some predefined values. so it waits a few seconds the first time, and has increased waiting time each occurence of OOM.)

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A Component shouldn't call GC.Collect. Since it has an application wide effect only the application should do so (if at all). –  CodesInChaos Jun 26 '13 at 7:39
    
If i would have written the .Net Framework, and i can't alloc a memory block, i would use GC.Collect(), - I think they're already doing this - I've seen indications that one of the internal GC triggers is certain failures to allocate memory. –  G. Stoynev Jul 9 '13 at 16:14

This isn't that relevant to the question, but for XSLT transforms in .NET (XSLCompiledTranform) then you might have no choice. Another candidate is the MSHTML control.

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You should try to avoid using GC.Collect() since its very expensive. Here is an example:

        public void ClearFrame(ulong timeStamp)
    {
        if (RecordSet.Count <= 0) return;
        if (Limit == false)
        {
            var seconds = (timeStamp - RecordSet[0].TimeStamp)/1000;
            if (seconds <= _preFramesTime) return;
            Limit = true;
            do
            {
                RecordSet.Remove(RecordSet[0]);
            } while (((timeStamp - RecordSet[0].TimeStamp) / 1000) > _preFramesTime);
        }
        else
        {
            RecordSet.Remove(RecordSet[0]);

        }
        GC.Collect(); // AVOID
    }

TEST RESULT: CPU USAGE 12%

When you change to this:

        public void ClearFrame(ulong timeStamp)
    {
        if (RecordSet.Count <= 0) return;
        if (Limit == false)
        {
            var seconds = (timeStamp - RecordSet[0].TimeStamp)/1000;
            if (seconds <= _preFramesTime) return;
            Limit = true;
            do
            {
                RecordSet[0].Dispose(); //  Bitmap destroyed!
                RecordSet.Remove(RecordSet[0]);
            } while (((timeStamp - RecordSet[0].TimeStamp) / 1000) > _preFramesTime);
        }
        else
        {
            RecordSet[0].Dispose(); //  Bitmap destroyed!
            RecordSet.Remove(RecordSet[0]);

        }
        //GC.Collect();
    }

TEST RESULT: CPU USAGE 2-3%

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