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Was going through a Python Tutorial and came across an example to check whether a number is prime or not. I changed a few things so that the result would display a list of all possible factors of the number, if the number is not a prime, However, the code didn't work.

Code:

def isprime(number):
    print "Reticulating Splines..."
    fnum=[1,]
    notprime=0
    for p in range(2, number):
        if (number % p) == 0:
            notprime=1
            fnum.append(p)
            continue
        if notprime == 1:     
            return number, "is not a prime because of these factors", fnum  
        else:
            return True
num =int(raw_input("Enter number: "))
print isprime(num)

Output:

Enter number: 12
Reticulating Splines...
(12, 'is not a prime because of these factors', [1, 2, 3, 4])
>>> 
Enter number: 25
Reticulating Splines...
(25, 'is a prime number')

Expected Output:

Enter number: 12
Reticulating Splines...
(12, 'is not a prime because of these factors', [1, 2, 3, 4, 6])

Enter number: 25
Reticulating Splines...
(25, 'is not a prime because of these factors', [1,5])

Poor control structure is my guess, but can someone fix my code?

I understand how range() works: In this case range() is given a start and a stop value, step defaults to 1. I understand that continue, continues a loop, but can I use it with if? I think that is wrong.

UPDATE
Solved, problem with indentation the continue should have been for the for loop, ditto for the if...notprime.

def isprime(number):
    print "Reticulating Splines..."
    fnum=[1,]
    notprime=0
    for p in range(2, number):
        if (number % p) == 0:
            notprime=1
            fnum.append(p)
    if notprime == 1:     
        return number, "is not a prime because of these factors", fnum  
    else:
        return number, "is a prime number"
num =int(raw_input("Enter number: "))
print isprime(num)

Update2: (Thx to @neil)
And the continue is plain stupid

Updated Code and speed comparisons between n/2 and sqrt(n) Thanks to @neil and @emmanuel
n/2 code: v2

import time
def isprime(number):
    start=time.clock()
    print "Reticulating Splines..."
    fnum=[1,]
    notprime=0
    for p in range(2, (number/2)+1):
        if (number % p) == 0:
            notprime=1
            fnum.append(p)
    end=time.clock()
    if notprime == 1:     
        return number, "is not a prime because of these factors", fnum, "Time taken", end-start  
    else:
        return number, "is a prime number. Time Taken", end-start
print "Prime or factor calculator v2 using n/2"
print #
num =int(raw_input("Enter number: "))
print isprime(num)

sqrt(n) code: v3

import math, time
def isprime(number):
    start=time.clock()
    print "Reticulating Splines..."
    fnum = [1,]
    last = int(math.ceil(math.sqrt(number)))
    for p in range(2, last + 1):
        if (number % p) == 0:
            fnum.append(p)
            fnum.append(number / p)
    # Remove duplicates, sort list
    fnum = list(set(fnum))
    fnum.sort()
    end=time.clock()
    if len(fnum) > 1:     
        return number, "is not a prime because of these factors", fnum ,"Time taken", end-start 
    else:
        return True, "Time taken", end-start

print "Prime or factor calculator v3 using sqrt(n)"
print #

num =int(raw_input("Enter number: "))

print isprime(num)

Output(Showing only time)

Time for sqrt(n) code: v3
Prime or factor calculator v3 using sqrt(n)
Enter number: 999999
Time taken', 0.0022617399697466567

Time for n/2 code: v2
Prime or factor calculator v2 using n/2
Enter number: 999999
Time taken: 0.11294955085074321

Time for original code(n): v1
Prime or factor calculator v1
Enter number: 999999
Time taken: 0.22059172324972565

v1 and v2 could not handle numbers 999999999, 999999999999 and 999999999999999, both gave a MemoryError

However v3 handled the three numbers:
999999999 : 0.010536255306192288
999999999999 : 0.75631930873896636
999999999999999 : 24.04511104064909

The shell hangs for 9999999999999999 and gives a MemoryError for 999999999999999999

Thanks to @Lennart, I am thinking of rewriting the code in a more OOP friendly way, by using classes. But I don't seem to be doing it right.

share|improve this question
6  
Subject: "Calculate all possible factors of a prime". Suppose the prime is p, then the factors and 1 and p. –  David Heffernan Jan 24 '11 at 12:18
3  
@abel It might help, but I guess the question explains it. I just thought it was funny - finding the factors of a prime is pretty easy!! –  David Heffernan Jan 24 '11 at 12:23
3  
Clarity of code. You should not be worrying about typing speed at your stage. –  Fred Nurk Jan 24 '11 at 12:47
1  
And, by the way, I didn't mean you will later be much more concerned with typing speed either: code clarity is always more important. (Though with experience, the breadth of code that "becomes" clear is larger.) Particularly when you're learning basic concepts, typing itself should be much less important. –  Fred Nurk Jan 24 '11 at 14:12
2  
@abel If you spend more time writing code than reading code, then you are doing it wrong! –  David Heffernan Jan 24 '11 at 14:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is your indentation - if notprime==1: shouldn't be within the for loop. It should only have one level of indentation.

Also, the continue is unnecessary.

EDIT:

An improvement you can make (I was just working on primes last night for a Project Euler problem) is to only loop to n/2 - there can't be a factor greater than half the number.

share|improve this answer
    
That(n/2) is neat. –  abel Jan 24 '11 at 12:32
    
Is there a way to convert it into a lambda function? I implemented n/2 by changing ` for p in range(2, number):` to for p in range(2, (number/2)+1): –  abel Jan 24 '11 at 12:41

Your final if notprime ... and the three lines following it are indented too far and as such is executed inside the loop, instead of outside.

share|improve this answer

You return after testing only one number. Move the if tests and the returns to outside of the for loop.

Also, returning True if it is a prime, and a string if it is not is unpractical. If you then call

if isprime(7):

That will always evaluate as True. I've improved things a bit:

def factors(number):
    fnum=[]
    for p in range(2, number):
        if (number % p) == 0:
            fnum.append(p)
    return fnum

for x in range(100):
    f = factors(x)
    if f:
        print x, "is not a prime and has factors", f
    else:
        print x, "is a prime"
share|improve this answer

@neil:

"An improvement you can make ... is to only loop to n/2 - there can't be a factor greater than half the number."

By the way, the highest value you need to test is int(math.ceil(math.sqrt(n))), no need to go to n/2 if each time you get a value, you get the associated one (i.e. if a x b = n, either a or b is lower than the square root of n and the other one is greater):

def isprime(number):
    print "Reticulating Splines..."
    fnum = [1,]
    last = int(math.ceil(math.sqrt(number)))
    for p in range(2, last + 1):
        if (number % p) == 0:
            fnum.append(p)
            fnum.append(number / p)
    # Remove duplicates, sort list
    fnum = list(set(fnum))
    fnum.sort()
    if len(fnum) > 1:     
        return number, "is not a prime because of these factors", fnum  
    else:
        return True

Greater performance, even if at the end the list is not sorted (but this can be done inside the loop by adding the 2 numbers p and number / p at the good indexes).

share|improve this answer
    
posted comparison between using your method vs n/2 –  abel Jan 25 '11 at 11:20

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