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for example:

void f(void *p){
  p=malloc(1);
  printf("%i\n",p);
}

void main(int argc,char *argv[]){
  void *p=malloc(1);
  printf("%i\n",p);
  f(p);
  printf("%i\n",p);
}

would produce something like this:

5513696
5513728
5513696

question: why passing by address and allocating wouldn't change pointer address? p.s. where can be something like realloc (maybe even recursive realloc by recusrive function call)

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1  
as a side node, main should always return something, thus int main () and return –  user173973 Jan 24 '11 at 14:58

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Because you're passing the allocated memory by address but you're actually passing the pointer by value.

And it's the pointer you're changing in there but, since it's passed in by value, that change isn't reflected when you leave the function.

If you want to change the pointer, you have to pass yet another pointer to it, like:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void f (void **p){
    // free (*p);         // add in to avoid memory leak
    *p = malloc (1);
    printf ("%i\n", *p);
}

int main (int argc, char *argv[]){
    void *p = malloc (1);
    printf ("%i\n", p);
    f (&p);
    printf ("%i\n", p);
    return 0;
}

This outputs:

6750728
6816336
6816336

as expected on my machine.

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When you pass a pointer to a function you are copying by value, hence you are assigning a different pointer, which until you malloced, pointed to the same place as the original.

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Whn you call p it receives a copy of a pointer ("pass by value") which is discarded upon the function return. You could pass the pointer address instead.

void f(void** p){
  *p= ... whatever you want
}
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You should do:

void f(void **p){
  *p=malloc(1);
  printf("%i\n",*p);
}

void main(int argc,char *argv[]){
  void *p=malloc(1);
  printf("%i\n",p);
  f(&p);
  printf("%i\n",p);
}
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when you pass a pointer as argument to a function a new pointer is created that points to the same location in memory.

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As other have pointed out, you're passing the pointer by value. If you want to (re)allocate a pointer in a function, pass it by reference like so:

void f(void *& p)
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1  
There are no references in C –  Bart van Ingen Schenau Jan 24 '11 at 15:09
    
There are no references in C yet! :-) ISO should look very hard into adding them, they'd save an awful lot of problems with indirection. –  paxdiablo Jan 24 '11 at 15:12

This has to do with the way C function calls and the stack work. It might sound a bit tricky when written, I'm afraid.

First, the pointer p-of-main is allocated on the stack. Then, a function call is prepared. For this, all integral values have to be copied to the stack, so the value of p-of-main is copied and the function f is executed. Now f can only see the copied value in its argument space, but this is not the same memory location as p-of-main, it's actually a new "variable": p-of-f.

To achieve what you want to do you actually have to pass a pointer-to-a-pointer (I've marked the changed lines with // !):

void f(void **p){     // !
  *p=malloc(1);       // !
  printf("%i\n",*p);  // !
}

void main(int argc,char *argv[]){
  void *p=malloc(1);  // !
  printf("%i\n",p);
  f(&p);              // !
  printf("%i\n",p);
}
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