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I have the following method that gets a rgb value and classifies it using a smaller palette:

private static int roundToNearestColor( int rgb, int nrColors )
    {
        int red = ( rgb >> 16 ) & 0xFF;
        int green = ( rgb >> 8 ) & 0xFF;
        int blue = ( rgb & 0xFF );
        red = red - ( red % nrColors );
        green = green - ( green % nrColors );
        blue = blue - ( blue % nrColors );
        return 0xFF000000 | ( red << 16 ) | ( green << 8 ) | ( blue );
    }

The code that annoys me is

red = red - ( red % nrColors );
green = green - ( green % nrColors );
blue = blue - ( blue % nrColors );

I am sure there is an alternate bitwise version of it that will perform faster, but as my bitwise arithmetic is a bit rusty, I have trouble finding such an expression. Any help or comments would be appreciated.

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Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/2661697/… –  payne Jan 24 '11 at 15:10
    
Provided that nrColors is a power of 2, you can simply mask out the lower bits of red. –  biziclop Jan 24 '11 at 15:10
    
Ye, but how do I find how many bits to mask. I need to find which power of 2 is nrOfColors. Wouldn't that slow the algorithm? –  baba Jan 24 '11 at 15:19
1  
To be perfectly honest... the algorithm seems to work as intended (unless you've found errors I don't see) and it is readable. Why change? Any efficiency improvement is going to be quite minimal. I wouldn't bother optimizing this. –  RD1 Jan 24 '11 at 15:40
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If nrColors is always a power of 2:

private static int roundToNearestColor( int rgb, int nrColors )
{
    if (Integer.bitCount(nrColors) != 1) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("nrColors must be a power of two");
    }
    int mask = 0xFF & (-1 << Integer.numberOfTrailingZeros(nrColors));
    int red = ( rgb >> 16 ) & mask;
    int green = ( rgb >> 8 ) & mask;
    int blue = ( rgb & mask );
    return 0xFF000000 | ( red << 16 ) | ( green << 8 ) | ( blue );
}
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