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Take the following case:

I have some work in a topic branch and now I'm ready to merge back to master:

* eb3b733 3     [master] [origin/master]
| * b62cae6 2   [topic]
|/  
* 38abeae 1

I perform the merge from master, resolve the conflicts and now I have:

*   8101fe3 Merge branch 'topic'  [master]
|\  
| * b62cae6 2                     [topic]
* | eb3b733 3                     [origin/master]
|/  
* 38abeae 1

Now, the merge took me some time, so I do another fetch and notice that the remote master branch has new changes:

*   8101fe3 Merge branch 'topic'  [master]
|\  
| * b62cae6 2                     [topic]
| | * e7affba 4                   [origin/master]
| |/  
|/|   
* | eb3b733 3
|/  
* 38abeae 1

If I try 'git rebase origin/master' from master, I'm forced to resolve all conflicts again, and I also lose the merge commit:

* d4de423 2       [master]
* e7affba 4       [origin/master]
* eb3b733 3
| * b62cae6 2     [topic]
|/  
* 38abeae 1

Is there a clean way to rebase the merge commit so I end up with a history like the one I show below?

*   51984c7 Merge branch 'topic'  [master]
|\  
| * b62cae6 2                     [topic]
* | e7affba 4                     [origin/master]
* | eb3b733 3
|/  
* 38abeae 1
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9  
TL;DR: git rebase --preserve-merges origin/master –  Ilia K. Mar 1 '12 at 7:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 24 down vote accepted

There are two options here. One is to do an interactive rebase and edit the merge commit, redo the merge manually and continue the rebase. Another is to use the -p option on git rebase, which is described as follows from the manual: "Instead of ignoring merges, try to recreate them."

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6  
I tried the -p option, and it does indeed leave the commit history as I wanted, but it forces me to resolve the conflicts again, even in files which were not edited in origin/master. As of your first suggestion, which would be the precise sequence of commands? –  jipumarino Jan 24 '11 at 16:49
1  
@jipumarino: git rebase -i (tell it to edit the merge commit), when it gets to the merge commit, git reset --hard HEAD^, git merge, fix conflicts, git commit, git rebase --continue. You might also want to look at git rerere which is supposed to help with this kind of thing (but I've never used, so I can't offer any advice or help). –  siride Jan 24 '11 at 17:10
1  
Thanks. I enabled rerere and tried with rebase -p and it's working as it should. –  jipumarino Jan 24 '11 at 18:51
2  
Here's an excellent blog post describing this exact situation: Rebasing Merge Commits in Git –  kynan Apr 23 '12 at 11:30
1  
rere is not the solution, as you still have to resolve merges manually the first time across. –  Flimm Jan 7 at 11:16

It looks like what you want to do is remove your first merge. You could follow the following procedure:

git checkout master      # Let's make sure we are on master branch
git reset --hard master~ # Let's get back to master before the merge
git pull                 # or git merge remote/master
git merge topic

That would give you what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
With rerere enabled, this seems to gives the same result as the rebase -p solution given above by siride. –  jipumarino Jan 24 '11 at 18:52

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