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Is there any straightforward way to modify a binary from the commandline? Let's say I know that my binary contains 1234abcd and i want to change it to 12FFabcd or FFFFabcd or maybe even FF34FFabc0 (you get the idea) :-)

How might I achieve that without using any special purpose tools like http://stahlworks.com/dev/swiss-file-knife.html or similar.

It would be great to do it just from the commandline with only standard linux tools.

Or maybe even better instead for searching for the hex string i want to replace directly writing FF at Offset 0x10000, 12 at Offset 0x100001 and so on.

Any idea?

Thanks in advance!

P.S.: I should add the following:

It should be scriptable and run directly from the commandline. I am looking for something like "binary-which-is-included-in-the-distro --write AB --at-offset 100000 --file thebinary.bin". I am quite sure that it is possible with "dd", but I wasn't able to wrap my head around the man page.

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5 Answers 5

printf '\x31\xc0\xc3' | dd of=test_blob bs=1 seek=100 count=3 conv=notrunc 

dd arguments:

  • of | file to patch
  • bs | 1 byte at a time please
  • seek | go to position 100 (decimal)
  • conv=notrunc | don't truncate the output after the edit (which dd does by default)

One Josh looking out for another ;)

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If you don't need it to be scriptable, you could try the "hexedit" utility. It is available in many Linux distributions (if not installed by default, it can usually be found in the distro's package repository).

If your distro doesn't have it, you can build and install it from source.

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It should be scriptable and run directly from the commandline. I am looking for something like "binary-which-is-included-in-the-distro --write AB --at-offset 100000 --file thebinary.bin". I am quite sure that it is possible with "dd", but I wasn't able to wrap my head around the man page. –  Josh Jan 24 '11 at 15:40
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Here's a Bash function replaceByte, which takes the following parameters: - the name of the file, - an offset of the byte in the file to rewrite, and - the new value of the byte (a number).

#!/bin/bash

# param 1: file
# param 2: offset
# param 3: value
function replaceByte() {
    printf "$(printf '\\x%02X' $3)" | dd of="$1" bs=1 seek=$2 count=1 conv=notrunc &> /dev/null
}

# Usage:
replaceByte 'thefile' $offset 95
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xxd tool, which comes with vim (and thus is quite likely to be available) allows to hex dump a binary file and construct a new binary file from a modified hex dump.

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But that also wouldn't work from the commandline (see my comment above to Dans reply), right? –  Josh Jan 24 '11 at 15:43
    
It should work: xxd -ps ... | sed -s "s/.../.../g/" | xxd -r ... –  SK-logic Jan 24 '11 at 15:46
    
Or even xxd -r -s <offset> –  SK-logic Jan 24 '11 at 15:47
    
Thats looks promising. Could you eventually go a bit into details with the example? Like: Edit "binary.x" write "FF" at 0x10000 –  Josh Jan 24 '11 at 15:47
1  
thanks a lot! I'll try that! StackOverflow is really amazing :) –  Josh Jan 24 '11 at 15:58
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alternatives:

  • my hex tool (simplest syntax, supports inplace editing)
  • ucon64 --nbak --poke=OFF:V FILE (meant for ROM dumps, should work with any binary file, but no inplace editing)
  • printf '\x31' | dd of=FILE bs=1 seek=OFFSET count=1 conv=notrunc (complicated syntax, better wrap in a script)
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