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I doubt this is possible without extensive jail-breaking, but is it at all possible to edit the iPad's (or any iOS device's) hosts file?

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Not without jailbreaking. Once it's jailbroken, it'll be the same as any other Unix/BSD system. I assume, I haven't done it before. –  Jasarien Jan 24 '11 at 15:50
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Imagine if any app could change the association between host names and their legitimate IPs. –  Jano Aug 2 '11 at 19:20
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@jano Presumably that issue now exists with apps on the Mac App Store. It's dealt with by OSX requiring a password before you can edit the hosts file, and also presumably by Apple's app vetting procedure. –  Danyal Aytekin Sep 21 '11 at 13:43
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@Jano: Microsoft Windows allows this now, and it causes 0 problems. You just need to have Administrator permissions. And there are legitimate reasons for wanting to modify a hosts file (all related to getting to stuff without a DNS server or else dealing with VPN issues). –  Josh Nov 14 '11 at 17:21
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10 Answers 10

up vote 30 down vote accepted

No. Apps can only modify files within the documents directory, within their own sandbox. This is for security, and ease of installing/uninstalling. So you could only do this on a jailbroken device.

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Only in the sandbox, but not only within the documents directory (see iOS Application Programming Guide > Application Runtime > File System). –  Jano Aug 2 '11 at 19:17
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The previous answer is correct, but if the effect you are looking for is to redirect HTTP traffic for a domain to another IP there is a way.

Since it technically is not answering your question, I have asked and answered the question here:

How can I redirect HTTP requests made from an iPad?

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I would imagine you could do it by setting up a transparent proxy, using something like charles and re-direct traffic that way

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Yes, you can edit the iPad hosts file, but you need to be jailbroken. Once you've done that, download Cydia (app market), and get iFile. The hosts file is located within "/etc/hosts".

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The easiest way to do this is to run an iPad simulator using XCode and then add an entry in the hosts file (/etc/hosts) on the host system to point to your test site.

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Question is about device not simulator. –  Janak Nirmal Oct 26 '12 at 5:18
    
@JanakNirmal Still a helpful answer though. –  Simon Oct 8 '13 at 8:00
    
@Simon good to hear that helped you. –  Janak Nirmal Oct 8 '13 at 10:03
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If you have the freedom to choose the hostname, then you can just add your host to a dynanmic DNS service, like dyndns.org. Then you can rely on the iPad's normal resolution mechanisms to resolve the address.

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You can also make use of a proxy server on your iPhone or iPade via mobile internet (3G) by using a iPhone Mobile proxy generator:

http://iphonesettings.net/mobileproxygenerator.php

Just enter the apn of your carrier (with apn username/password if needed) and the proxy server you want to go through and tap Generate

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No, you can't change iPad's host file(without jailbreak), but can workaround.

Here is my scenario:

  • Mac OS X, with IP 192.168.2.1, running a web app
  • iPad, the device you would like to test the web app
  • Charles (for Mac), enables HTTP proxy for your iPad

I am going to test the web app running in my Mac via iPad, but I can't access directly to it.

The solution works for me:

  • Firstly, make sure that your server and iPad are in the same local network.
  • Then, set up Charles proxy, in the menu "Proxy > Proxy Settings...", fill in Port(mostly 8888) and toggle Enable transparent HTTP proxying.

enter image description here


  • Setup proxy setting in iPad.

enter image description here

Now you can visit your web app in iPad.

Of course you can use other proxy tools like Squid or Varnish in Linux, or fiddler in Wondows.

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Workarond I use for development purposes:

  1. Create your own proxy server (One option would be: Squid on Linux).
  2. Set your hosts file with your domains.
  3. Set the proxy server on the IPAD/IPHONE and you can use with your hosts.
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I know it's been a while this has been posted, but with iOS 7.1, a few things have changed.

So far, if you are developing an App, you MUST have a valid SSL certificate recognized by Apple, otherwise you will get an error message on you iDevice. No more self-signed certificates. See here a list:

http://support.apple.com/kb/ht5012

Additionally, if you are here, it means that you are trying to make you iDevice resolve a name (to your https server), on a test or development environment.

Instead of using squid, which is a great application, you could simply run a very basic DNS server like dnsmasq. It will use your hosts file as a first line of name resolution, so, you can basically fool your iDevice there, saying that www.blah.com is 192.168.10.10.

The configuration file is as simple as 3 to 4 lines, and you can even configure its internal DHCP server if you want.

Here is mine:

listen-address=192.168.10.35

domain-needed

bogus-priv

no-dhcp-interface=eth0

local=/localnet/

Of course you have to configure networking on your iDevice to use that DNS (192.168.10.35 in my case), or just start using DHCP from that server anyway, after properly configured.

Additionally, if dnsmasq cannot resolve the name internally, it uses your regular DNS server (like 8.8.8.8) to resolve it for you. VERY simple, elegant, and solved my problems with iDevice App installation in-house.

By the way, solves many name resolution problems with regular macs (OS X) as well.

Now, my rant: bloody Apple. Making a device safe should not include castrating the operating system or the developers.

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