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I have

public class Letter
{
    public string Value;
    public int Id;

    public Letter(string val, int id)
    {
        this.Value = val;
        this.Id = id;
    }
}

I need a kind of duplicate dictionary (LookUp(?)) for:

private something TestCollection()
{
    List<Letter> inputList = new List<Letter> { 
        new Letter("a", 9), 
        new Letter("b", 5), 
        new Letter("c", 8), 
        new Letter("aIdentic", 9) 
    };

    // compare inputList by letter's ID(!)
    // use inputList (zero based) INDEXES as values

    // return something, like LookUp: { "a"=>(0, 3), "b"=>(1), "c"=>(2) };

}

using .NET 4

How to obtain it?

As I understand, there is 2 solutions, one from .NET 4, Lookup<Letter, int>, other, classic one Dictionary<Letter, List<int>>

thanks.

EDIT:

For output. There is 2 letters "a", identified by ID 9 on index "0" in the array(first position). "b" have index 1 (second position in the input array), "c" - index 2 (is third).

EDIT 2

John solution:

    public class Letter
    {
        public string Value;
        public int Id;

        public Letter(string val, int id)
        {
            this.Value = val;
            this.Id = id;
        }
    }

    private void btnCommand_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        List<Letter> inputList = new List<Letter> { 
            new Letter("a", 9), 
            new Letter("b", 5), 
            new Letter("c", 8), 
            new Letter("aIdentic", 9) 
        };

        var lookup = inputList.Select((value, index) =>
            new { value, index }).ToLookup(x => x.value, x => x.index);

        // outputSomething { "a"=>(0, 3), "b"=>(1), "c"=>(2) };
        foreach (var item in lookup)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0}: {1}", item.Key, item.ToString());
        }

    }

Output (I expect no more than 3 keys):

//WindowsFormsApplication2.Form1+Letter: System.Linq.Lookup`2+Grouping[WindowsFormsApplication2.Form1+Letter,System.Int32]
//WindowsFormsApplication2.Form1+Letter: System.Linq.Lookup`2+Grouping[WindowsFormsApplication2.Form1+Letter,System.Int32]
//WindowsFormsApplication2.Form1+Letter: System.Linq.Lookup`2+Grouping[WindowsFormsApplication2.Form1+Letter,System.Int32]
//WindowsFormsApplication2.Form1+Letter: System.Linq.Lookup`2+Grouping[WindowsFormsApplication2.Form1+Letter,System.Int32]

EDIT 3 Equals

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
    if (obj is Letter)
        return this.Id.Equals((obj as Letter).Id);
    else
        return base.Equals(obj);
}

public override int  GetHashCode()
{
    return this.Id;
}
share|improve this question
    
What is wrong with your last example i.e. a dictionary of dictionaries? Did you try it? It sounds like you need multiple values per key, not multiple keys per value as the question suggests. –  Tim Lloyd Jan 24 '11 at 15:50
    
@chibacity: yes. There are multiple keys in the dictionary, so to each key corresponds an array of values. –  serhio Jan 24 '11 at 15:54
    
@serhio A dictionary of lists is a good solution then. A single key can refer to a list with multiple items in. –  Tim Lloyd Jan 24 '11 at 15:55
    
@chibacity: maybe. The question is how to obtain it :) –  serhio Jan 24 '11 at 15:57
    
@serhio I'm afraid 'obtain it' is not entirely clear. What problem are you having exactly? –  Tim Lloyd Jan 24 '11 at 15:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Lookup is probably the right class to use here - and LINQ lets you build one with ToLookup. Note that Lookup was introduced in .NET 3.5, not .NET 4.

Having said that, it's not at all clear how you'd go from your input to your sample output...

EDIT: Okay, now that I understand you're after the index, you might want to use the overload of Select which includes an index first:

var lookup = inputList.Select((value, index) => new { value, index })
                      .ToLookup(x => x.value.Id, x => x.index);
share|improve this answer
    
i know that such a function exist, however don't know exactly how to apply in my case. A litte example would be cool. –  serhio Jan 24 '11 at 16:00
1  
@serhio: Ah, by index. So the value is irrelevant? That would have been useful to make clearer... will edit my answer. –  Jon Skeet Jan 24 '11 at 16:06
1  
@serhio: Ah, I've got it - I hadn't read that the 9 is the ID, not the "a". With you now. I'm used to IDs usually being expressed before values... and for "Letter" I'd expected a textual ID. Having said that, my answer is still appropriate - your sample code uses x => x.value, not x => x.value.Id like mine does. –  Jon Skeet Jan 24 '11 at 16:41
1  
@serhio: "Foo" would actually have been clearer, to be honest - it wouldn't have suggested as strong a correlation between the textual part and its ID. (I hope your real code doesn't use public fields, mind you...) –  Jon Skeet Jan 24 '11 at 16:45
1  
@serhio: Because the result isn't a Lookup<Letter, int> - it's a Lookup<int, int>. Your ID is of type int, not Letter. If you want to be able to look up by Letter, you can get rid of the ".ID" and implement IEquatable<Letter> in Letter itself (or just override Equals and GetHashCode). –  Jon Skeet Jan 24 '11 at 16:59

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