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I'm looking for a library that will simplify working with SQL in C++. I'm aware that there are different ORM solutions (like those listed here), and I had a quick look over them, but I'm probably looking for something different (not exactly ORM), so if you could help...

I want something that won't encapsulate access to the database etc, but will act more like request builder and binder, and I run the requests myself. I expect that this would allow me to simplify SQL handling and at the same time have access to run custom queries, without necessarily staying within the object model.

For the moment the closest thing I've found is this Database Template Library, which allows to define binding like this:

   boundIOs["INT_VALUE"]    == rowbuf.exampleInt;
   boundIOs["STRING_VALUE"] == rowbuf.exampleStr;

(column INT_VALUE is bound to exampleInt field of the object) and then run queries using such bindings, which I find quite convenient and flexible enough at the same time.

I'll definitely take a closer look to this library, but probably you could also suggest some other library/framework that uses similar ideas, and is more popular/mature/supported etc, or share your experience with this DTL library? Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

OTL has a prety nice interface that doesn't have an ORM model.

It uses streams to set/get bind variables. A simple example is shown below

otl_stream i(50, // buffer size
              "select * from test_tab where f1>=:f<int>" // SELECT statement,
              db // connect object
             ); 
i<<8; // assigning :f = 8

//execute query
while(!i.eof()){ // while not end-of-data
    i>>f1>>f2;
    cout<<"f1="<<f1<<", f2="<<f2<<endl;
}

You can see more examples here

Edit, showing how binding multiple variables is trivial

otl_stream i(50, // buffer size
              "select * from test_tab where f1>=:f<int> AND f2=:g<int> and f3=:h<int> and f4=:i<int>" // SELECT statement,
              db // connect object
             ); 
i << 8 << 10 << 12 << 42;

//execute query
while(!i.eof()){ // while not end-of-data
    i>>f1>>f2;
    cout<<"f1="<<f1<<", f2="<<f2<<endl;
}

As you can see, you define your placeholders and their types once f1>=:f<int> AND f2=:g<int>. You then stream your values into the query (which is typesafe) before executing it.

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I'm afraid this will not be convenient anymore as soon as I have more than 2 bound variables in my requests... Imagine a table with 10 columns that you need to bind to variables, and the corresponding binding - the DTL way seems to be more suitable for this, or am I missing something? –  Roman L Jan 24 '11 at 16:31
    
@7vies, binding multiple variables is trivial. i << rowbuf.exampleInt << rowbuf.exampleStr; is much shorter and simpler (IMHO) than boundIOs["INT_VALUE"]==rowbuf.exampleInt; boundIOs["STRING_VALUE"]==rowbuf.exampleStr; –  Glen Jan 24 '11 at 16:46
    
just as I said, it is trivial when you have 2 or 3 of them, but when you have much more it is way less obvious. For the moment I don't see much advantages of OTL over SOCI which also uses streams... –  Roman L Jan 24 '11 at 18:10
    
also, with DTL approach you can probably reuse the same binding in different requests, while with streams you have to re-do the binding again and again. –  Roman L Jan 24 '11 at 18:18
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Finally I didn't find any library not trying to hide the database access, most of the libraries try to be too much ORM-like. So I just took the DTL bind approach and wrote some text-processing helpers to build SQL requests that I need.

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