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I'm provided the following table in SQLite.

CREATE TABLE Items ( PK INTEGER PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT, ItemId VARCHAR, Sold VARCHAR);

I have two rows with the following data, the PK is unique and ItemId is the same. When an Insert statement is ran, two rows are inserted with the same ItemId.

1, 16, 22

2, 16, 19

To run an Update statement - I'm limited by the fact that I am only being passed the ItemId and I need to update two rows in ascending order. While I truly recognize this is a horrible data model, it is what I'm up against with no ability to change the table structure.

Is there a way to update each row with the updated Sold value when I have duplicate ItemId values, but the PK is unique?

At this point, I've tried the following, but I still update both rows with the second update statement's Sold value (in the case following, the value of 20).

UPDATE Items SET Sold = 23  WHERE ItemId = 16 AND ROWID = ( Select rowid From Items Order By ROWID Limit 1);
UPDATE Items SET Sold = 20  WHERE ItemId = 16 AND ROWID = ( Select rowid From Items Order By ROWID Limit 1);

Thank you.

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1  
What exactly is the business expecting to see at the end - how do they distinguish the 2 items sold relations? –  Mark Jan 24 '11 at 16:11
    
What does "ascending order" mean in this case? Ascending order of primary key? And is your problem strictly limited to two rows (which is easy) or does it have to deal with any number of rows? –  Larry Lustig Jan 24 '11 at 16:42
    
My problem is only limited to two rows each time. On the business end, they want to see two rows for the same ItemId, because the sold values just arrive as is. Therefore if the first amount sold is 23 and the second amount sold is 20, then they're inserted in ascending order, 23 then 20 - the order in which the data arrives. A third party is passing me two rows with the same ItemId each time, two 16s, two 17s, two 18s, etc. So I can have two 16s with sold values of 23, 20. I can have two 17s with sold values of 32, 48... and so on. –  Todd Jan 26 '11 at 14:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I guess the question would be, how do you know which ROWID you want to update if all you have is the ItemId? You could try something like:

update Items item1 set Sold = 23 where ItemId = 16 and not exists(select rowid from Items where item1.rowid < rowid)

update Items item1 set Sold = 20 where ItemId = 16 and not exists(select rowid from Items where item1.rowid > rowid)

Although this wouldn't be too useful if there are more than 2 rows for the given ItemId.

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The insert or replace syntax is good for that.

insert or replace into items(pk, itemid, sold)
select pk, itemid, 23 from items where itemid = 16 limit 1;

insert or replace into items(pk, itemid, sold)
select pk, itemid, 20 from items where itemid = 16 limit 1;
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