Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this template class:

template <class Tin, class Tout>
class Foo
{
    Tin input;
    Tout output;

    static inline void __ensure_type_consistency
    {
        int16_t* p = (int16_t *)0;
        // uint16_t* p1 = p;
        Tin* check_type_in = p;
        Tout* check_type_out = p;  
    }
public:
    ...
}

I want to make sure that Tin and Tout are both typedef'd to type int16_t and not some other type. (NOTE: please read the full question before jumping to conclusions)

If I uncomment the commented line, I get an error as expected; the compiler doesn't allow pointers of different types to be assigned to each other without a cast:

"src\foo.h", line 47: error #145: a value of type "int16_t *" 
cannot be used to initialize an entity of type "uint16_t *"

But if I keep it commented out, and I instantiate:

Foo<uint16_t, int32_t> illegalFoo;

I don't get compiler errors, even though the same type of check is used (creating an incompatible pointer assignment in a static function that is never actually called, but which should cause compiler errors)

Is there a way to create a static compile-time type consistency check? Why doesn't the one I'm using work?

NOTE: Ignore for a moment the obvious solution of just getting rid of the template parameters. That would "solve" this problem, but there are some out-of-band things going on here with my debugging tools where typedefs are being used to impart important metadata: I want to ensure that Foo.input is of type Tin where Tin is either an int16_t or a typedef that resolves as an int16_t, and similarly with Foo.output and Tout. There are slight differences from the perspective of my debugging tools, where typedef'd types and their base type can be distinguished, even though within a C++ program they are identical.


edit: by the way, this is an embedded system, and I can't use Boost. It's also not C++0x.

share|improve this question
5  
Gah! Double underscore names == reserved for the compiler... –  Billy ONeal Jan 24 '11 at 16:26
1  
The error message is telling you that you are passing a uint16_t as argument to your template, not a int16_t. What is the exact consistency check that you want to perform? Do you want to allow both uint16_t and int16_t? Is that a typo (there are others in the presented code)? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 24 '11 at 16:31
1  
Why can't you use Boost on an embedded system anyway? I'm using it on a embedded medical system at the moment. –  GrahamS Jan 24 '11 at 16:33
1  
@GrahamS: This is a TI C28xxx DSP. There are embedded systems and then there are embedded systems. The more capable ones usually have megabytes of RAM and are capable of running an OS (e.g. embedded Linux or smartphones). I work w/ less capable ones which have < 32K of RAM, and sometimes have weird memory setups. As far as I know, Boost has not been ported to my system, and even if it were, I'm not sure the costs (compile speed, mainly) would be tolerable for this one check. –  Jason S Jan 24 '11 at 16:40
1  
Foo<uint16_t, int32_t> just gives substitution failure on __ensure_type_consistency(), so it isn't instantiated. On Foo<int16_t, int16_t> there's no substitution failure, so it's compiled and you then get the compiler error on "uint16_t* p1 = p;" –  Tonttu Jan 24 '11 at 16:43

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

One simple way:

template <class, class> class Foo;

template <>
class Foo<int16_t, int16_t> {
  ...
};

The other way, if your conditions are actually more complicated, is to use BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT from Boost or static_assert from C++0x. Since you wanted non-Boost options and C++0x may not work, here's something more similar to what you posted in your example:

(void)(true ? (int16_t**)0 : (Tin**)0);

and the same for Tout. That needs to be in some method that is either called or has its address taken (the idiom for doing that is at the end of the Boost.Concept_check implementation documentation). If you want something like the is_same/static_assert solution others have posted but without Boost or C++0x, try:

template <class, class> struct types_valid {static const int value = -1;};
template <> struct types_valid<int16_t, int16_t> {static const int value = 1;};

Then put static char foo[types_valid<Tin, Tout>::value]; in your class outside of any methods. I believe you won't need to actually define foo as long as you don't refer to it anywhere.

share|improve this answer
    
No, that won't work. I need the member variables to be of type Tin and Tout, not int16_t. (again, they're identical from the perspective of C++, but not from my debug tools) –  Jason S Jan 24 '11 at 16:29
    
@Jason S: Try the last thing I posted more recently (using ?:), and see if that satisfies your requirements. –  Jeremiah Willcock Jan 24 '11 at 16:31
    
That doesn't seem to work either. I wonder if the template types are causing the compiler to overlook its normal type checking. –  Jason S Jan 24 '11 at 16:36
2  
Are you putting that code in your method and then trying to call the method? If you don't call the method, the type checks inside it won't run. –  Jeremiah Willcock Jan 24 '11 at 16:38
1  
You have to have the check in some method that actually gets called (or has its address taken) for it to be instantiated. –  Jeremiah Willcock Jan 24 '11 at 16:46

You can use the is_same type trait in a static_assert. The C++0x would look like:

static_assert(std::is_same<Tin, std::int16_t>::value &&
              std::is_same<Tout, std::int16_t>::value, "o noez");

You can find both the is_same type trait and the static assert in Boost as well. Even if you are compiling for an embedded system, it is straightforward to extract just the type traits and static assert headers from Boost and neither of those libraries have any runtime overhead.

share|improve this answer

While you can't use boost or C++1x, you can make your own is_same compile-time type comparator and hack up some poor-man's compile-time assertion

// Beware, brain-compiled code ahead!
template< typename T1, typename T2>
struct is_same      { static const bool result = false; };

template< typename T > 
struct is_same<T,T> { static const bool result = true; };

template< bool Condition, typename Dummy = void >
struct static_assert {
  typedef bool result;
};

template<typename IntentionalError>
struct static_assert<false,IntentionalError> {
  typedef typename IntentionalError::does_not_exist result;
};

and use it like this:

template <class Tin, class Tout>
class Foo
{
    Tin input;
    Tout output;

    typedef typename static_assert<is_same<Tin ,int16_t>::result>::result Tin_test;
    typedef typename static_assert<is_same<Tout,int16_t>::result>::result Tout_test;
    typedef typename static_assert<is_same<Tout,Tout   >::result>::result Tout_test;
// ...
};
share|improve this answer
    
Arf, beat me to it :p @Jason: types are necessarily checked by the compiler while methods are only checked if they are used. –  Matthieu M. Jan 24 '11 at 16:45
    
Interesting. I'll try it. Thanks! –  Jason S Jan 24 '11 at 16:55
    
hmm, how is that a compile-time test? If the test fails I want to cause a compile-time error. –  Jason S Jan 24 '11 at 16:56
    
@Jason: It might not work (I haven't compiled it), but the way it was intended to work the static_assert<false,..> specialization will fail to compile if IntentionalError is (the default parameter) void, since void doesn't have a nested does_not_exist type. –  sbi Jan 24 '11 at 17:51

Your method works, but you must actually call __ensure_type_consistency ( ) somewhere for the compiler to throw the error. If the method is never called, then the compiler thinks it can ignor it.

I just tried it in VC++ 2010, and it works.


Are you using GCC? Try putting using attribute ((used)) on __ensure_type_consistency.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, thanks for the explanation. (no, I'm not using gcc. :( ) –  Jason S Jan 24 '11 at 17:06

You could use Boost Concept Checks:

BOOST_CONCEPT_ASSERT((boost::Integer<Tin>));
BOOST_CONCEPT_ASSERT((boost::Integer<Tout>));

See http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_45_0/libs/concept_check/using_concept_check.htm

share|improve this answer
    
Ah damn: just saw your edit. No Boost. Oh well. –  GrahamS Jan 24 '11 at 16:28

I've adapted several responses to this question, and this seems to do the trick nicely:

A helper class:

template <typename T1, typename T2>
struct TypeConsistency
{
private:
    static inline void checkfunction()
    {
        T1* p1 = (T1 *)0;
        T2* p2 = p1;
    }
public:
    static inline void check() { checkfunction; }
    /* The above line does nothing at runtime,
     * but takes the address of checkfunction(),
     * which causes a compile-time type check.
     */ 
};

Applying this in my foo class:

template <class Tin, class Tout> 
class Foo
{
    Tin input;
    Tout output;

public:
    Foo() { 
        TypeConsistency<int16_t, Tin>::check();
        TypeConsistency<int16_t, Tout>::check();
    }
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
I misread the question, but now that I have reread it, I think you will be better off with some type of static assert that does not require creating functions: template <class A,class B> struct is_same { static const bool value = false; }; template <class A> struct is_same<A,A> { static const bool value = true; }; typedef char assert_are_same[ is_same<T1,uint16_t>::value? 1 : -1 ]; or something in that line does not require the compiler to generate code at all. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 24 '11 at 17:40
    
Note that typedefs are only aliases but they represent a single type. That means that typedef int a; typedef int b; is_same<a,b>::value; will evaluate to true. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 24 '11 at 17:42
    
@dribeas: interesting... so the typedef char somedummyexpr[-1]; is what would cause the compile failure? –  Jason S Jan 24 '11 at 18:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.