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I am making an application that stores documents and gives each one a UID based on a SHA1 digest of a few things including the timestamp. The digest has a lot of characters, and I want to allow users to identify the documents by using the first x characters of the full digest. What's a good value for x if the number of documents is maybe around 10K - 100K?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Adapting the formulas on on wikipedia for the Birthday problem, you can approximate the probability of collision as e^(-n^2/(2^(b+1))), where n is the document count and b is the number of bits. Graphing this formula with n=100,000, it looks like you'll want b > 45 at least. I'd be more inclined to go with 64 to make it a nice and round number. That said, do have a plan to deal with collisions if they occur (maybe alter the timestamp slightly, or add a nonce?)

For that matter, if the sha1 is based on more than just the content of the document, why not simply make it a random ID? In this case collisions are less of a problem, as you can always generate a new random number and try again (the probability of a collision with a single try is the same, however).

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Small nit - Isn't the formuala e^(-n^2/(2^(b+1)))? It changes answer slightly to b >40. –  Fakrudeen Jan 26 '11 at 11:24
    
@Fakrudeen, indeed - I made an error when transcribing it into the answer. The graph was correct though..... although I just now realize stackoverflow didn't make a link for it :| –  bdonlan Jan 26 '11 at 11:27
    
I've updated the answer to have the correct formula as agreed upon in the comments. –  Justin Johnson May 23 '12 at 18:52
    
Biham/Chen offer examples of Near Collisions; and Knudsen demonstrates Truncated Differentials. Both are problems for truncated hashes; neither are instances of the birthday paradox. –  jww Dec 18 '12 at 5:25

Be careful of truncation as there is no reduction in proof that the smaller hash is secure. See Kelsey's http://csrc.nist.gov/groups/ST/hash/documents/Kelsey_Truncation.pdf. Kelsey gives to heuristic arguments stating the same ("Related Hash Outputs" and "Near Collisions"). Biham/Chen offer examples of Near Collisions; and Knudsen demonstrates Truncated Differentials.

In the end, you probably want to feed your data into an HMAC with the truncated size (the size is digested by the HMAC, too) and then use the truncated HMAC.

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There really isn't a value for this; part of what makes SHA a good general-purpose hashing algorithm is that similar data does not necessarily produce similar hashed values. Your best bet (without knowing anything else about your system) would just be to search the list of documents whose hashes start with the value supplied by the user, then either present them with a list of documents to select from or go directly to the document if there's only one.

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is that what git does with revs? –  dan Jan 24 '11 at 16:42
    
@dan It is, and it's generally a fairly good approach. –  Nick Johnson Jan 24 '11 at 23:40

It's a generalization of the birthday problem. In you case n is number of documents, and instead of constant 365 you'd have number of possibilities the cutoff gives you (so for k bits it's 2k).

Of course exact calculation is out of the question, but you might use approximation.

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Biham/Chen offer examples of Near Collisions; and Knudsen demonstrates Truncated Differentials. Both are problems for truncated hashes; neither are instances of the birthday paradox. –  jww Dec 18 '12 at 5:25

Well, here's a possibly too simplistic of an answer..

If with full sha1 you get about 1 in 2^160 chance of collision, then by truncating one character you increase the chances of collision by 16 (all possible values of the truncated character)... which is 2^4.. So, if you truncate x characters you get 1 in 2^(160 - 4*x) chances of collision.. right?

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1  
For a single document this is true, but the probability of any collision occuring for any pair of documents increases much more rapidly –  bdonlan Jan 24 '11 at 16:34
    
Biham/Chen offer examples of Near Collisions; and Knudsen demonstrates Truncated Differentials. Both are problems for truncated hashes; neither are instances of the birthday paradox. –  jww Dec 18 '12 at 5:25

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